Book Jacket

 

rank 314
word count 111013
date submitted 30.07.2009
date updated 24.02.2014
genres: Science Fiction
classification: moderate
complete

2150 Total Integration

Michael Gray

A cryo scientist, trapped in his own invention, is found alive 130 years later and becomes humanity's leader and saviour.

 

Mika Gerey, a cryogenic scientist, is buried in his newly developed cryo chamber during a 21st century super storm. He's found by 22nd century archaeologists and revived with considerably advanced medical science.

His dream of being born in the future becomes a reality. He quickly adapts but struggles with his new friend's ambition to exploit technology in the human body as he visualises the destruction of humanity and other galactic species as the end result. He finds new love, she's beautiful and she's 22nd century!

Humans achieve deep space travel and become visible to friendly and aggressive species. Mika's psychology retains primitive instincts which he employs, along with 2150 science, to defeat attacks upon Earth. His leadership is seen as humanity's saviour and he's made world leader. His imagination takes humans out into the galaxy to become members of the Galactic Seniors Partnership.

Technical science makes humans invulnerable, which again draws the interest of the 'Gohdamma'. Meeting this species reveals they are the originators of human evolution. Their revelations shatter fundamental beliefs and they once again leave humanity in awe of their knowledge and power.

 
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tags

aliens, creator, galaxy, may challenge the imagination as it projects humanities technical evolution., no serious profanity, science, starship, techno...

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324 comments

 

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child wrote 1396 days ago

This could so easily have been dry and dusty - a sawdust read. Instead, it is pacy, intelligent and a thoroughly good read. Well written to the extent, I who doesn't understand Cryogenetics in the slightest, was intrigued. The reader is not bombarded with with scientific blah that sometimes seems to be a platform for just how brilliant the authors knowledge of his subject, this author gently feeds us what we need to move the story along and leaves out the mechanics of high-tech information that is not needful and, which I personally, find boring.
Highly recommended. I have backed your book and wish you every success with it.

Child - Atramentus Speaks

Jack Hughes wrote 1411 days ago

This is a seriously impressive novel that, by rights, should become a bestseller within a short time of its release. The technological nature of the plot is not overbearing, there is a wonderful human element at the heart and the writing is succinct and very descriptive. An exceptional story for the intelligent minded reader.

Backed without reservation.

Jack Hughes
Dawn of Shadows

D.S. Williamson wrote 1499 days ago

Great first chapter, Mr. Gray. You know how to write. What I paricularly liked about the opening paragraph is that it "feels" like voice-over in what promises to be a very good film. In other words, you "show it" even though you're "telling it".

This probably doens't make sense but I read screenplays from some of my "movie' friends out here in L.A and that's what it sounds like. On my watchlist.

tecmic wrote 154 days ago

Dear Michael,

With 2150 Total Integration you have achieved a perfect balance between the technical details of scientific developments and a gripping story with interesting characters. This is what I think good science fiction should be like.

The plot is well placed and starts with, global warming, a topic of current interest, and continues with plenty of unexpected twists and turns that keep the reader hooked.

The characters are well built and generate sympathy and admiration, especially Mika and Jodi. I particularly like the way Mika Gerey experiences and adapts to the new technologies, yet still processes the primitive human characteristics that are so essential to survival. The first person viewpoint also makes the reader feel as if he is actually experiencing this new world first hand.

The story is very well written with detailed descriptions and wonderful imagery that make your future world come to life.

High stars and wachlisted.
Best wishes and good luck getting published,

Sophekles
The Serotonin Transfer



Thanks Sophekles, I appreciate your comments, particularly because 2150TI is how I see science fiction, not predatory lizards or some other mutation with high intelligence. Sci fi fantasy full of innuendo but with no solid facts, leaves me cold! I think it demonstrates a lack of imagination.

Sophekles wrote 155 days ago

Dear Michael,

With 2150 Total Integration you have achieved a perfect balance between the technical details of scientific developments and a gripping story with interesting characters. This is what I think good science fiction should be like.

The plot is well placed and starts with, global warming, a topic of current interest, and continues with plenty of unexpected twists and turns that keep the reader hooked.

The characters are well built and generate sympathy and admiration, especially Mika and Jodi. I particularly like the way Mika Gerey experiences and adapts to the new technologies, yet still processes the primitive human characteristics that are so essential to survival. The first person viewpoint also makes the reader feel as if he is actually experiencing this new world first hand.

The story is very well written with detailed descriptions and wonderful imagery that make your future world come to life.

High stars and wachlisted.
Best wishes and good luck getting published,

Sophekles
The Serotonin Transfer

Sophekles wrote 155 days ago

Dear Michael,

With 2150 Total Integration you have achieved a perfect balance between the technical details of scientific developments and a gripping story with interesting characters. This is what I think good science fiction should be like.

The plot is well placed and starts with, global warming, a topic of current interest, and continues with plenty of unexpected twists and turns that keep the reader hooked.

The characters are well built and generate sympathy and admiration, especially Mika and Jodi. I particularly like the way Mika Gerey experiences and adapts to the new technologies, yet still processes the primitive human characteristics that are so essential to survival. The first person viewpoint also makes the reader feel as if he is actually experiencing this new world first hand.

The story is very well written with detailed descriptions and wonderful imagery that make your future world come to life.

High stars and wachlisted.
Best wishes and good luck getting published,

Sophekles
The Serotonin Transfer

Sophekles wrote 155 days ago

Dear Michael,

With 2150 Total Integration you have achieved a perfect balance between the technical details of scientific developments and a gripping story with interesting characters. This is what I think good science fiction should be like.

The plot is well placed and starts with, global warming, a topic of current interest, and continues with plenty of unexpected twists and turns that keep the reader hooked.

The characters are well built and generate sympathy and admiration, especially Mika and Jodi. I particularly like the way Mika Gerey experiences and adapts to the new technologies, yet still processes the primitive human characteristics that are so essential to survival. The first person viewpoint also makes the reader feel as if he is actually experiencing this new world first hand.

The story is very well written with detailed descriptions and wonderful imagery that make your future world come to life.

High stars and wachlisted.
Best wishes and good luck getting published,

Sophekles
The Serotonin Transfer

Jared M. Park wrote 175 days ago

Really good opening chapter. The premise of the book is great and I think you have a promising story here. High marks from me.

tecmic wrote 183 days ago

“2150 Total Integration” is a powerful hard-science-fiction story mixed of first contact elements.

First of all, I thoroughly enjoyed the world you have created and your vision of the future. It is obvious that you put a lot of thought in details, both at the technological level (everything is made from intelligent materials and controlled by AI’s, teleportation seems to be the main way of traveling, including between Earth and Moon, etc) and at the social level (how can a society evolve in a world without material barriers). I was particularly intrigued about the latter aspect and wondered what constituted the restricting factor that prevented overpopulation (you probably explain in later on, although the immediate theory that comes to my mind is socio-educational barriers).

The story opens with an element of prime importance today (global warming) and a warning about its devastating effects. In fact, it is the global warming that triggers the plot. Once the main character is uprooted from his world, he is immersed in a world of wonders (for him at least). Aside from the descriptions themselves, I personally loved the fact that the aliens have such a peculiar way of communication. Even in modern SF stories, most folks still expects other intelligent species to possess verbal communication and only few authors forward an alternative.

This is a fascinating story about future and I’ll return to read more, as time allows. On my WL and high marks.
Andreea

(Duplicity)



Hi Andreea, thank you for your comments...without giving too much away, it's technology not barriers that answer the population question in the future. What I write I believe will happen although not necessarily in the way I predict. The big problem is for us to survive ourselves, which is very much in the balance at the present time.
Mike.

Andreea Daia wrote 183 days ago

“2150 Total Integration” is a powerful hard-science-fiction story mixed of first contact elements.

First of all, I thoroughly enjoyed the world you have created and your vision of the future. It is obvious that you put a lot of thought in details, both at the technological level (everything is made from intelligent materials and controlled by AI’s, teleportation seems to be the main way of traveling, including between Earth and Moon, etc) and at the social level (how can a society evolve in a world without material barriers). I was particularly intrigued about the latter aspect and wondered what constituted the restricting factor that prevented overpopulation (you probably explain in later on, although the immediate theory that comes to my mind is socio-educational barriers).

The story opens with an element of prime importance today (global warming) and a warning about its devastating effects. In fact, it is the global warming that triggers the plot. Once the main character is uprooted from his world, he is immersed in a world of wonders (for him at least). Aside from the descriptions themselves, I personally loved the fact that the aliens have such a peculiar way of communication. Even in modern SF stories, most folks still expects other intelligent species to possess verbal communication and only few authors forward an alternative.

This is a fascinating story about future and I’ll return to read more, as time allows. On my WL and high marks.
Andreea

(Duplicity)

Seringapatam wrote 411 days ago

Michael, Not normally what I read in fact i stay away from normally, but this felt real and full. a very complete book. I liked the work you have put into this before you started writing and how you transferred that to the script. A great book, so well done. High Score.
Please consider me for a read or watch list wont you. Many thanks. Sean Connolly. British Army on the rampage. (B.A.O.R)

fictionguy8 wrote 602 days ago

Good flowing barrative with enough clever dialogue to sail through the first chapter. Occasionally wise, but told in a down to earth manner so that it keeps the reader within its own world. My only [problem is that he sounds like a high school teenage in the first two paragraphs. Although movies are now doing that to their main characters, so don't listen to me. I will go bakc and read more. But for now, I read enough to give it five stars and back the book.

Tod Schneider wrote 648 days ago

This is excellent sci fi, or I should say Sci Fi with capitals, as it does truly deliver some interesting scientific developments -- no space opera here! You deliver what sci fi fans come looking for -- ideas. Nicely done!
I only made a few critique notes on chapter one, nothing major, but here they are:
This exchange was a little confusing -- I read it as contradictory, and had to re-read it a few times to see what you meant: "Do you want to talk? I nodded. It was still easier than talking." I didn't catch that you were referring to nodding as what was easier than talking. But while we're at it, you might consider changing one of the "talks" to "chat" or something, just to avoid repetition.
I would cut "I queried" for a couple reasons. One is just that it sounds clunky to me. The other is that its what I call an unneeded attribution. If we can tell from the context who is talking, you are off the hook, and don't have to spell it out. (This is from "Told what?" I queried.)
The third note was that when he makes coffee it seems odd that he doesn't talk about smelling and tasting, or asking for cream and sugar, etc.
But all of these are minor and easy to address. Overall, really quite an entertaining and thoughtful piece -- and you are clearly the right guy to write it.
Best of luck with this!
And although it's a big step outside of your genre, if you're so inclined, please do come take a peek at the Lost Wink.
Thanks!
Tod
http://authonomy.com/books/40646/the-lost-wink/

tecmic wrote 768 days ago

TOTAL INTEGRATION
Wow. What a great idea for a story. My neighbor was talking just yesterday about doing this so when I read the pitch, I downloaded it immediately to learn more how it works. And not only discovered how it works, but a good story about it as well. Mika is a good main character; the bewilderment he feels at discovering “shapers” and brain implants rings true. The research you’ve done to describe what the future will be like shows through (although I’m guessing a lot of this comes from an active imagination rather than reading more about future technology). Either way, it’s an exciting read. Highly starred and added to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?



Hi Wanttobeawriter, it's not so much research as it is a continuous interest in all things scientific and technical. I've been preoccupied with science fiction since a boy, but not with unrealistic, comic book stuff. I'm a gadget freak, so my family calls me, but I stay in touch with what's happening in technology and science. What I write as future technologies is simply a projection of what is actually happening in research and development today.

Wanttobeawriter wrote 770 days ago


TOTAL INTEGRATION
Wow. What a great idea for a story. My neighbor was talking just yesterday about doing this so when I read the pitch, I downloaded it immediately to learn more how it works. And not only discovered how it works, but a good story about it as well. Mika is a good main character; the bewilderment he feels at discovering “shapers” and brain implants rings true. The research you’ve done to describe what the future will be like shows through (although I’m guessing a lot of this comes from an active imagination rather than reading more about future technology). Either way, it’s an exciting read. Highly starred and added to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?

Neville wrote 863 days ago

2150 Total Integration.
By Michael Gray.

This is a good,well thought out Sci-Fi story. It comes up with things you dont expect which keeps the reader guessing, at least it did for me. To think what the future has to offer over 130 yrs and more ahead, takes some imagination. You certainly have a talent for this kind of story and have written it so well. I think your efforts will be rewarded... Love the book cover!
I've given a high star rating for this.

Neville. The Secrets of the Forest - The Time Zone.

Mach100 wrote 1027 days ago

Hello Michael,
I really like your whole concept - the foul weather (personally I think the whole global warming hype is a load of horse) which was credible and the future setting is equally believable even though I think we might go the other way and lose everything like previous civilisations have done.
Couldn’t find faults in first two chapters but I will be reading and commenting more.
I hope that you will rate and comment on one or more of my books – ‘Accident’ is the one I’d like to promote the most.
Best wishes, Charles Dyer (Mach100)

mdws77 wrote 1033 days ago

I have just finished reading your entire book and I did like the way you were able to keep my attention. While I don't agree with some of your conclusions and philisophy, I did like the way you presented the subjects. There are some minor punctuation issues that made it a little hard to follow who was saying what at times, but overall this book was a very good read.

Gareth N wrote 1115 days ago

SF42 - I've read the opening chapter and will return later to read more. Initial comments are -

This chapter is brimming with a lot of excellent ideas about the changes to technology over the time Mika has been in stasis. I like the fact you've thought about the social and economic changes of new inventions. The pace of the plot slows somewhat in the second half of the first chapter as you introduce all these new technologies to us. If I'm honest I'd like to have seen them gradually integrated into the plot. That might just be me though.

I enjoyed the opening and I'm keen to find out how the story unfolds. The writing is very good but I'm having a bit of a problem believing that some of the dialogue is spoken by real people. Sometimes it sounds like it should be narrative rather than dialogue. I guess that it's a bit tricky since you've adopted a first person narrative. Anyway, it's not likely to be a problem with the story telling and it's only my point of view in any case.

I'll return later.

alex wrote 1137 days ago

I have added this to my watchlist. I think its a great premise well executed and I look forward to reading more chapters.

Billy Young wrote 1156 days ago

After reading the first chapter I have some minor issues with the story so far. If the lab complex is built into the side of a mountain then would a super storm be a real threat to it? If you were to describe the base more and have most of it above ground and only the main lab below then this would negate this problem. I also felt that you moved onto the future to quickly before you had fully introduced your main character. There is no harm in using minor characters from the twenty first century that you could refer back to in memories to give more depth to your main character later in your story. Good luck with this.

Kenneth Edward Lim wrote 1164 days ago

Michael,
"2150 Total Integration" is an intellectually stimulating piece diifficult to put down. What it does is open up a realm of possibilities the human ken is capable of and that very fact is where the attraction lies. I followed Mika's progress as a human transplanted into a future world, and he in turn. through lucid prose from a first person POV and just as informative a dialogue with Jodi, fed me information not in my normal diet. Thank you so much for this delightfully educational read.

Kenneth Edward Lim
The North Korean

stephen racket wrote 1170 days ago

This is very imaginative and well-written, as good a Sci-Fi story as I've read on Authonomy. The advances in technology are beautifully described, the damage inflicted on the planet by global warming unnervingly realistic. Added to my WL for further reading and generously starred. Good luck with this.

PD Casteel wrote 1183 days ago

Nice work. I always struggle with descriptions of technology in SciFI. You resisted the temptation to go too deeply into the description of technology. That made this a much better read than many of the works I come across. I thought the transition from the past to the new present was jarring. That was the moment my interests peeked.

writingbear wrote 1204 days ago

Michael,

I put your fine book on my shelf today! Please take a look at my two novels DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS or MY GENTLEMAN FRIEND for a possible backing. Your help will be appreciated! Good luck and happy writing.

Dwain-Thomas

David Whelan wrote 1232 days ago

Really like the story, has a great premise and the characters seem easy to relate to. The desciption for the scientific parts are also well done, I reckon this could be a published book no bother. Top quality work

David Whelan
The Silent Chronicles Book 1: Desolate

writingbear wrote 1238 days ago

Michael,

I checked out your fine SF book today. I liked it! So I backed it! If you could take a look at my two novels, DIFFERENT DIRECTIONS or MY GENTLEMAN FRIEND for a possible backing it would be very much appreciated.
Thank you, good luck and happy writing.

Dwain-Thomas

yellowdog wrote 1248 days ago

Mike,

I'll try again to finish.

`...the team wasn't large. It didn't need to be....' - either new sentence at `it' or qualifier such as `nor did it'.

`....youngest in our tem, sat at his desktop workstation he looked up from his screen and grinned.' - run on sentence - suggest new sentence at `He'.

`When are we testing it for real boss?" John easily...' - here the speaker is John, but the comment or thoughts are Mika's. Should go to new paragraph.

In the paragraph beginning `Although I was being reconciled....' You have Mika aking a question, and Jodi replying. Even though Mika prefaces Jodi's reply by saying it was surprising, there is separate dialogue so should go to new paragraph. It makes it easier for reader in any case. If you wanted Mika to relate converstation as a `report' then perhaps single quotes and you could maintain as is, but I think it would be better split up.

That's all from me today Mike. It is too hard to provide edit commentary on the site. I lost these comments twice.
If you want me to edit (to my best ability - I am no expert) the chapter you could send it to my email as a Word doc. and I will mark it up.

I agree with one of your comments re the woods. Yes, it doesn't seem to matter how many times I go over a text, someone will find something I missed. Sort of like domestic blindness.

All the best

Brian

yellowdog wrote 1248 days ago

Mike,

This is the last time I do this. I have already trascribed items I was commenting on to Word and then typed into here and then I accidently hit the chapter 6 and lost it all.

Okay. Sentence `Made no difference....' - end of sentence doesn;t gel with start. Sense not clear. Suggest `That I was pathological etc. made no difference as house empty nobody etc)

`...project was (all) time consuming...' - suggest omit

`....everyday life in (this) the research....'

rhine wrote 1248 days ago

chapter 1: excellent mechanics. My main comments are pacing/flow related.
missing apostrophe: brain[']s
opinion: I would put the sentence "Leading a cryo" at the very start because it defines the character, and first chapter more than the weather or day of the week.
I would also put a chapter break after the word survival to emphasize the magnitude of the world transition and give the reader a cesura.
Suggest you dedicate more than one paragraph to the cryo prep, as it is the primary macguffin in your story.
Perhaps even worry if X fixed that problem with Y yet that killed the poor monkey.

Scott Rhine (Foundation for the Lost)

yellowdog wrote 1249 days ago

Hi Michael,

An excellent read and extremely well written. I am truly jealous. THe character narrative is well handled as are the actions. I read through to the end of chapter 2, so it is definitely engaging. You have crafted a wonderful modern world with the advent of intelligent materials and antigrav technology. This is all presented in an easy manner by Jodi. I appreciated the deft of touch when dealing with the narrators incredulity in such a situation.

You have interspersed the exposition and the introduction of the alien visitors and the double trip to the spacecraft spell an evolving storyline for me.

You might want to restrict paragraphs to the one speaker. Several times I was confused when an action by one character followed anothers speech e.g. `He grinned.' I also noticed a couple of run oin sentences in the first chapter, but I can't go back now and tell you exactly which ones.

Well written, a great imagination at work. I'm ranking you five and as soon as I find a spot you're on my shelf.

If you get a chance please have a look at my novel - Future Crime.

All the best

Brian

Francene Stanley wrote 1257 days ago

This is really good. I love the topic and have often wondered about whether it could happen. The writing is good and the story flows well. The tension builds well.

I'd be happy to back this and star rate it well. I'd be honoured if you would return read.

Francene. Still Rock Water.

Hampstead wrote 1270 days ago

Great story, written in a conversational style which makes it even more readable. I can see this book, with a bit of good marketing on the side of the published, becoming a bestseller.

Michael Clifford

Sometime in Andalusia

www.ten-minute-stories.com

Hampstead wrote 1270 days ago

Great story, written in a conversational style which makes it even more readable. I can see this book, with a bit of good marketing on the side of the published, becoming a bestseller.

Michael Clifford

Sometime in Andalusia

www.ten-minute-stories.com

Hampstead wrote 1270 days ago

Great story, written in a conversational style which makes it even more readable. I can see this book, with a bit of good marketing on the side of the published, becoming a bestseller.

Michael Clifford

Sometime in Andalusia

www.ten-minute-stories.com

Woodville wrote 1286 days ago

Great title.

sean.bazaar wrote 1304 days ago

Excellent writein on the first chap. I'm thouroughly intrigued to see if Mika's mind can be equiped with the modern tech, if not.....He's in for some wild experiences. 5 star rating, will back in a day or two.

Leslie Rocker wrote 1308 days ago

Sci.fi. is not my field, but I am impressed with this. I have only read a couple of chapters each at the beginning and end, but it is imaginative and well written. It also seems to be backed with a degree of scientific knowledge.
I am happy to back it and invite you to read I, Said the Rook.
Leslie Rocker

Beval wrote 1321 days ago

A Brave New World indeed! I loved all the technology and the idea that mankind has made it to the stars.
"Mika wants to explore? Hell, I want to explore along with him!
Underneath all this is the feeling of mankind grown soft, nothing to fight against any more and the edge that made us hack our way to the top of the food chain has gone. Mika, product to a rougher tougher time is going to be either a shock or salvation.
Highly readable and most enjoyable "
That was what I said when I first read this. On taking a second look, I went deeper into the story, reading chapter further on to see how the plot developed and how your brought it to a conclusion.
The technology is a joy, exciting and believable and I thought you handled the alein creator theme very well, I had a feeling of Arthur C Clarke, someone I haven't read in years, but there was a feel of him here.
You also raised some very topical questions about what is being done to the planet which gives this a very "now" feel. The message is there, but its not advanced at the expense of the plot.
All in all, I think I agree with me...always nice to discover one has been right:-))...this IS enjoyable and readable.

Dave Goodenough wrote 1334 days ago

Very, very cool! In fact, outstanding! I'm putting this on my watchlist so I can back it as soon as a couple obligations are cleared. Meanwhile, I'm going to ask my friend Kristi to back your book. I'm sure she wil like it.
Dave Goodenough

ccb1 wrote 1336 days ago

Backed 2050 Total Intergation. SciFi is not a genre we read often, but glad we took time for your book. Good job. Hope you will take a look at Dark Side.
CC Brown

J.S.Watts wrote 1338 days ago

Intriguing premise and some nice writing.

I thought the opening paragraphs were too full of back story/explaination/description of who and what. To me it felt like you were cramming it all in before the earthquake. Had you thought of beginning with the earthquake or some other more dramatic event and filtering in the back story as a gradual reveal? Just a thought.

I noticed a few typos, like: "..but a lot of talent, he had a bright future..." which I'd write as: ..but a lot of talent. He had a bright future.... Also "brains ability" should be "brain's ability" and shouldn't your MC be worried about being a Twenty First Century ignoramus???

J.S.Watts
A DARKER MOON

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 1341 days ago

Fascinating idea and pitched with authenticity. I will definitely come back for more because the early leads you supply can take this story anywhere. Obviously well thought out and extremely well written. Patrick Barrett (Cuthbert-how mean is my valley)

ccb1 wrote 1343 days ago

Don't usually read SiFi, but this looks interesting. Placed 2150 on our watchlist.
CC Brown
Dark Side

Benjamin Dancer wrote 1362 days ago

I wanted to be offended. Went to ch 15. By the second paragraph, I was hooked—the overpopulation bit. Here are my notes as I read:

EarthII made me laugh.

I can geek out on the wormholes, time travel/pseudo-science

The story kicks off a million thoughts in my head. From biology/overpopulation to astrophysics. It’s really fun to read.

The relationships are interesting. But I confess I’m focusing on the scifi, piecing the science and new ecosystems together.

I got pulled into the story and forgot to document my thoughts for awhile—I guess that’s a good sign.

By the way, I’m not offended—but intrigued about the theology or aliens.

Balance parameters: what makes this interesting to me is the ethics.

Pretty cool universe you’ve conjured up, and pretty relevant to the universal problems I live with day-to-day.

rab14 wrote 1370 days ago
rab14 wrote 1370 days ago

There are some minor editting issues to address but although, I used to read a lot of Sci Fi and haven't read much lately, I still found this an intriguing concept. Cryogenetics has been used as a plot tool before ,nevertheless you give it a new twist by taking your protagonist from the climatic changes the world has to deal with in 2010 and dumping him unceremoniously in 2150 along with shapers and brain implants. A pacy well told tale. I wish you luck with it. K.J. Rabane According to Olwen

Roman N Marek wrote 1371 days ago

I like this. It needs a little polishing of the spelling and grammar, but has a fine beginning that is intriguing enough to keep one reading. Good old-fashioned SF. My only worry with the story was that Jodi is the only person Mika interacts with for quite a long time. There appears to be a reason for this, but wouldn’t this have bothered Mika? How/why has Mika been assigned to this one individual and why aren’t there others monitoring him, interested in him, meeting him, etc. Wouldn’t Mika wonder whether Jodi has any friends? In Chapter 3 he enquires about a wife but this is after 2 weeks of acquaintance. Is Jodi a total loner? Wouldn’t he at least have introduced Mika to other people? Also, perhaps more could be made of the mystery surrounding Jodi’s real job to beef up the tension a little. The encounter with the Cracians in Chapter 7 is practically skipped over. Yet I would have thought that would be as dramatic as waking up 130 years in the future. Apart from these quibbles, which I think could be fairly easily addressed, it’s a very enjoyable read and I wish you well with it.

tecmic wrote 1372 days ago

High time for a stable bookshelf ... Now that Authonomy is changing, I decided to look through the 300+ books I've read on this site for my favorite five. '2150 Total Integration' made my list. I suggest you give it a look.

Frank Calcagno
The First Human War



Frank! I wrote it, but thanks anyway.

Mike.

Frank Calcagno wrote 1372 days ago

High time for a stable bookshelf ... Now that Authonomy is changing, I decided to look through the 300+ books I've read on this site for my favorite five. '2150 Total Integration' made my list. I suggest you give it a look.

Frank Calcagno
The First Human War

JM Miller wrote 1374 days ago

I liked the way you kept the action coming, and dove right into the plot. It reminds me of the heyday of SF.

Backed

JM Miller wrote 1374 days ago

I liked the way you kept the action coming, and dove right into the plot. It reminds me of the heyday of SF.

Backed

Robert Craven wrote 1376 days ago

Hi Michael,

This has an assured touch throughout and weaves your research into the measured pace without losing the reader's interest.

backed

Rob

GET LENIN