Book Jacket

 

rank 647
word count 53295
date submitted 16.05.2010
date updated 29.07.2011
genres: Science Fiction, History, Biography...
classification: universal
complete

A Short History of a Long Future - A Guide for New-man

Andrew Vecsey

Account of history and the future. Topics on physics, chemistry, nutrition, biology are treated in a simplified form using analogies and easy-to-understand language.

 

Humans destroy nature and re-invent it. They replace their bodies by robots and achieve immortality by storing their brains in a centralized safe haven called Heaven Inc.and by controlling their replaceable robot bodies remotely. They find a new world and use a collection of best genes from animals and plants to create a new life form called new-man. They teach new-man all they know, and in turn new man leads them to god.

This book is written to guide new-man much like our bible was written to guide us. Written in a poetic and simplified style full with analogies, it outlines the history of the universe and of mankind and of the physical and social sciences and philosophy. It offers rational explanations of physical laws of gravity, inertia and light as well as a rational answer to the circular question of how a creator god came to be without being created.

Lives of famous people real and imaginary like the one who tamed fire, the builder of the pyramids, Buddha, Attila, Khan, Gutenberg, Luther, Galileo, Adam Smith, Marx, Hitler, and the developers of new technologies in our future as well as the creator of new-man are described.

 
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greeneyes1660 wrote 1384 days ago

Andrew, You left no stone unturned. I think this is a masterpiece and though fiction, which often imitates life as I think this does on many levels, truly stimulates the mind. This is thought provoking and the amount of time and work you put into this is clearly eminent.

Your voice is direct, yet soothing. It is almost hypnotic in spots. I think this is one book people will be talking about for genertions to come. It reminds me of the type of book that will have an impact like Dyanectics did when it first came out. Bravo Backed Patricia aka Columbia Layers of te Heart

Battle Knyght wrote 1394 days ago

Eclectic evolution; organic, sociological technological and more. Chaos theory and fuzzy logic woven together and presented in a chaotic format that enhances the the story line. At times difficult to follow, but worth following.
Well researched and asks the questions scientists and philosophers have addressed. The pathway to answers will make you question your own existence and beliefs.
Well written. Backed.
BK

LeClerc wrote 1391 days ago

Hi Andrew,

this has got to be one of the best pieces of fiction on the site. I want more and I am looking forward to the day you upload some additions. Reality, fiction, theology; are we sure you are not a robot?
Backed.

Phil
Danny Murphy

Esrevinu wrote 1419 days ago

You have constructed an incredible original story. Your ability to slowly pull back the curtains, and build tensions-- that explodes on the page, is mesmerizing.
Loved the read
Best
Scott
The Esrevinu Chronicles/Secrets of the Elephant Rocks

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 1438 days ago

This is certainly compulsive reading, it seems to involve every conspiracy theory known to man and even some he hasn't thought of yet. Very well written with a sense of urgency and immediacy. It should do very well indeed. Paula Barrett (Cuthbert-how mean is my valley)

Giles L Nash wrote 299 days ago

I can't think of another book on here like this. Quite unique and deep. Been away from this site a while and happy to see there is stuff like this on here to come back to. I was starting to think it was all YA.

Seringapatam wrote 446 days ago

Your initial homework that you obviously carried out before you started has paid dividends is playing a massive part in this book. You have an ability to tell a story so well and make the reader not only feel part of it, but make the reader not want to come back out for a long time. I think you have a little gem with this and I loved it. Good luck for this and I score high.
Sean Connolly. British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R) Please consider me for a read or watch list wont you? Many thanks. Sean

berniemint wrote 451 days ago

An extraordinary achievement, Andrew. A real tour-de-force reviewing the known history of the planet and mankind in your own particular way seamlessly flowing into an imagined future. Although there is a 'character', Joe Ova, the writing isn’t obviously character-driven. This tended to put me off. The book is more of an account than a story and consequently rather dry. However, that’s your style and, according to it”s own terms of reference, it works. Similar, in some ways, to Last And First Men by Olaf Stapledon. On the shelf.

englishjustforyou wrote 1000 days ago

Your insight in chapter 4 about the roll drugs and music play in shaping our future is right on the mark. Now I understand why there is a prohibition to Marihuana and why it will be promoted one day by governments. I also understand now why some governments prohibit music. Thanks for your extremly enlightning and eye opening book.

andrewvecsey wrote 1148 days ago

"this is a non fiction book."
I'm not satisfied with this response. Science cannot just be made up -science fiction can.
You haven't answered any of the points, merely referred me to a video of somebody (you?) reading the text........

....Even as a kiddies book this violates the first principle of education. NO simplification should extend into untruth, as your do. Gravity is a consequence of geometry - or do you wish to revise Einstein?
Sorry. Science fiction I like, distorted simplifications of science I do not.



This book is obviously not for you. The book's main aim is not to teach but to make you think, much like a fantasy novel. And it includes many distorted simplifications. The two points of view in this book are those of the scientists in the far future who (I'm sorry to break it to you) do end up revising Einstein, and those of New-man, mankind's new creation. New-man's looks on the attraction of gravity much as we look on the attraction of love. New-man believes that the earth is a living organism, and looks on men as earth's sperm, capable of ejecting far away to fertilize new planets. New-man is very spiritual. In a way he paints a spiritual face to science. The video of me reading the text is a audio picture book version on Youtube. www.youtube.com/improvemyenglish

Pete A wrote 1149 days ago

"this is a non fiction book."
I'm not satisfied with this response. Science cannot just be made up -science fiction can.
You haven't answered any of the points, merely referred me to a video of somebody (you?) reading the text.
There are no LAWS of chaos it's just a branch of mathematics. Electrons are NOT larger than protons or neutrons - indeed they are usually modeled as fundamentals and have no spacial dimension.
There are NOT three 'types of mass...' you merely list three particles which have mass as a property.
Even as a kiddies book this violates the first principle of education. NO simplification should extend into untruth, as yours do.
Gravity is a consequence of geometry - or do you wish to revise Einstein?
Sorry. Science fiction I like, distorted simplifications of science I do not.

andrewvecsey wrote 1149 days ago

Andrew I’m confused. Is this fiction or non-fiction? Or is it a mix of the two?
“The size of the universe is finite” Is it? Who says so? How big is it?
“The law of chaos” Haven’t heard of that one. Where does it come from?
Gravity is a fundamental force? I thought it was established by some chap that it is the consequence of the geometry of space. Is that not right?
“3 types of masses in the universe” Which universe? A fictional one? Or is this just a high school simplification?
Electrons are 2000 times bigger than protons and neutrons? Are you being serious, creating a new impossible set of natural laws or what?
“All mass either keeps moving in a straight line…or stays still” What like the Earth moving around the Sun. That sort of straight line?


Thanks for reading my book. To answer your questions, this is a science-fiction in a format of a guide book much like the bible. It attempts to explain things with simplifications, analogies, and common sense concepts. With this in mind, the universe in this book is finite. The actual size is not stated. You can read more on the laws of chaos on the internet. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chaos_theory
The other physical laws like gravity, inertia, light, etc are described with simplifications and analogies to help understand them. All motion is relative. The path of the earth thru the universe is not an orbit, but a wavering straight line. This is displayed in the audio picture book version at http://www.youtube.com/improvemyenglish#p/u/13/pnMQwPpbO74

Pete A wrote 1149 days ago

Andrew I’m confused. Is this fiction or non-fiction? Or is it a mix of the two?
Things I found odd include:
“The size of the universe is finite” Is it? Who says so? How big is it?
“The law of chaos” Haven’t heard of that one. Where does it come from?
Gravity is a fundamental force? I thought it was established by some chap that it is the consequence of the geometry of space. Is that not right?
“3 types of masses in the universe” Which universe? A fictional one? Or is this just a high school simplification?
Electrons are 2000 times bigger than protons and neutrons? Are you being serious, creating a new impossible set of natural laws or what?
“All mass either keeps moving in a straight line…or stays still” What like the Earth moving around the Sun. That sort of straight line?

I just don’t understand.

andrewvecsey wrote 1158 days ago

Hey Andrew.
........
Style:
Cannot really follow the course of the action by titles and subtitles.
The format is not very enjoyable – all paragraphs are in the same format – like a technical book. .....
........



It IS a technical book. It is a manual or guidebook written for a new life form called New-man. The style I wanted to convey is to use analogies, simplifications, myth and poetry, much like in a bible.

Iguess wrote 1158 days ago

Hey Andrew.

Remarks:

Style:
Cannot really follow the course of the action by titles and subtitles.
The format is not very enjoyable – all paragraphs are in the same format – like a technical book.

Ideas:
The idea is not original – it is quite common in the literature – man evolving and becoming gods and recreating earth. It’s called singularity sometime or theory of simulation

The future evolution it is not very accurate technical – currently, the main view is that a Super Artificial Intelligence will exist in 50 to 100 years and the time scales will be much smaller. If you read Ray Kurzweil – he hopes to become immortal until the end of his life.

The book tries to apply the current patterns to the future – you think that we can assume how we will think and act in the future – which is a nice thing to have in a sf book but if your book wants to be somehow technical – you must keep in mind that our brain will be enhanced biologically, electronically or a combination of both – so we will be smarter and think different.

Over all – I dont think your book will be appreciated as people start to read about Singularity and Ray Kurzweil – this is becoming a religion almost – and from what I read it looks you don’t know about it.
Also it has a pretty bad format. In the current format I don’t think it has many chances to be published or appreciated. I hope you will understand that I cannot lie to you and tell you that your book is good – I hate to do that. If somebody asks my opinion I can’t help it but to tell him the truth.

However – the idea itself could become a nice sf book although there are a few on the same idea – but this will be the best course of action in my opinion. Of course a sf book is made by characters and evolution of action so it will have to be a masterpiece to be published.

Best wishes.

Julia Siboney wrote 1241 days ago

I'm sorry it took so long for me to read this, it's been on my watchlist for ages. I'm a sucker for good ideas and when people go poke the unknown sides of literature there are 50% chances that they come up with something of epic proportions. Your book is one of the lucky 50%, really. I like the style and I really appreciate the fact that you went beyond a lot of "don't's" in literature and reality and came up with something truly original. I wish you all the best with this book, I hope it gets out there, honestly.

RonParker wrote 1269 days ago

Hi Andrew,

An unusual and great concept. There are, however, quite a number of tense slips and such which need to be addressed before it is 'publisher ready'

I would also rethink your short pitch. as it stands, anyone reading it might think this book is non-fiction and some people might stop reading at this point which would be unfortunate.

Watch for overusing the word 'exploit'. You use it frequently, sometimes more tnan once in the same paragraph or even sentence.

In the first section, your introduction, you have the word 'experiments' which should be 'experiment' and in chapter one you have 'an achild' instead of 'a child', 'gazed' which should be 'gaze' and 'grew' which should be 'grow'

All this can be eaily be put right so I'm going to back the book on the assumption you will address these issues.

Ron

Eunice Attwood wrote 1286 days ago

This is an inspiring, insightful read, with an approach to spirituality that is a little different to the norm. You have a strong, confident voice, with an effective use of words. An intelligent read. Happy to back. Eunice - The Temple Dancer - or you may prefer The Poetic Voice of Soul.

Karen Eisenbrey wrote 1292 days ago

Andrew,

Some time ago, you backed my book Crane's Way. I am finally able to read your book, A Short History of a Long Future. This is a very ambitious and interesting project! I especially like the way you relate scientific and historical knowledge in the style of myth and lore. The analogies to individual development are also intriguing. It's sci-fi that doesn't go like typical genre sci-fi.

I read the Foreword/Introduction, Part 1 Chapter 1 and Part 3 Chapter 1, and offer the following nitpicks for your editing pleasure:

Index
Forward/Introduction should be Foreword/Introduction

Introduction and throughout:
Was it a deliberate choice to not capitalize such things as Milky Way, Jews, Christians, etc.? If so, make sure you are consistent throughout. Mostly you don't capitalize anything but people's names, but once in awhile, something slips in.

Part 1 Chapter 1

non of the gods You want "none"
adapted his god Did you mean "adopted"?
tried to united all people "unite"
Dr. Ova makes an unexplained leap when he says that followers of Jesus were called christians. This is not anything that would make sense intuitively, but maybe it's OK. It's not clear that they weren't called that until after Jesus was gone, but Dr. Ova is writing at such a remove that maybe he doesn't know or care about the details. But if he does, "Christian" means "little Christ" ; "Christ" is a Greek word meaning the same thing as the Hebrew "Messiah"; and "Christian" was originally meant as an insult. That might be too much to go into.

Part 3 Chapter 1

Most our children . . . You want "Most of our children. . ."
We were more interested about them then they were about us. "interested about" seems awkward to me. "Interested in" might be better. You want "than", not "then."
"We were able only observer and hear . . ." You want "We were able only to observe . . ."
"New man claimed to have contact some of them . . ." You want "contacted".
. . . until the harmonic, separated from the dis harmonic . . . No comma needed here.
"patters" should be "patterns"
"not to slow" should be "not too slow"
"the patterns of in heaven" Choose "of" or "in" but not both.
Two paragraphs are not italicized that seem like they should be.

Very interesting work, and I wish you all the best with it.

Karen Eisenbrey
CRANE'S WAY
TIME SQUARED

Mavrick wrote 1347 days ago

Andrew,

I have had A Short History of a Long Future on my list of promised reads since 30th June, but have now reached it.

I suspect I might be offering a different opinion to others here.

I have a problem with this as a work of fiction, although I appreciate the reason for it, and how it came about.

I'm writing this note as I read chapter 2 (Authonomy numbering) which I am finding lacks the essence of true fiction, of showing, not telling. In this phase of the book at least, you are simply listing a series of facts and, to be fair, I don't really see what else you can do. At this stage it's not really science fiction, nor is it general fiction, although I accept that subsequent chapters might be very different.

I have no quarrel in the way in which you are presenting these facts. The actual text is clear and concise, considering the sheer size of the subject, and the analogies you give are original (at least, to me) and informative.

If this was offered as non-fiction, as an educational tool or similar, I think I would support it without hesitation. But as fiction, I'm not yet convinced. And even as non-fiction, I'm not quite sure. There already a number of books out there that cover many of these topics to one degree or another, ranging from the serious (such as Stephen Hawking's A Brief History of Time) to the more down to earth (Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything). Could this compete?

That said, I shall read on and see how it develops.

In chapter 4 (and perhaps previously, although I didn't find it noticeable, if so) you use a fair amount of repetition, although some of this may be deliberate, I can't really tell, which, in itself, is not a good sign. Examples include,

[ . . . carrying out a well planned plan . . . ] well conceived plan ??
[ . . . for world dominance had at this point dominated . . . ] had at this point succeeded in ?? (And the word dominated appears twice more in this paragraph).

[ . . . her resources used to feed the polluting machines. The machines farted and polluted the environment.] You have already referred to 'the polluting machines', so there's no need to say they polluted the environment. This might be better expressed as,

[ . . . her resources used to feed machines, which farted and polluted the environment.]

[Children were enslaved as child slaves in many . . . ] could simply state,
[Children were enslaved in many . . . ] the 'as child slaves' is implied.

Too many repetitions of words such as 'exploit' or 'exploitation', and 'greed'. There are many more.

And why the constant change of font? I find this mildly irritating, though it may not bother others.

Sadly, I cannot afford the time to read on. I have selected a number of random chapters but have not, as yet, reached one in which something other than the presentation of endless facts is happening, and so my earlier concerns have not been resolved.

Never-the-less, it is an impressive tome..

Neil.

James Apologist wrote 1350 days ago

I am interested in your book and am putting it on my watchlist. I will be reading parts of it as soon as I can. In that it is related to the Bible, it perhaps bears some similarity to my own book, which, if you are a Christian, potential Christian, or a thoughtful and objective skeptic in this regard, you might enjoy. Its title is "Things Are Not as They Seem."

Jared wrote 1360 days ago

Very well written, diligent research, readable and very impressive. I'm pleased to back this.
Jared.

Mediocre Writer wrote 1370 days ago

This is a cerebal work of prose, one which makes me wonder just where it's headed. I'm guessing you're intending its scope to be wide and deep, as so you should... You clearly know your stuff, and (I imagine) have spent a fair bit of time and effort doing your research. For that alone you should be congratulated... The writing is generally good, and extremely informative. Well done. Backed.

writerwithacause wrote 1378 days ago

This looks like an interesting read. No mention of Pangea? Backed. Lisa

J.S.Watts wrote 1379 days ago

Interesting, but personally I could have done without all the preamble in Authonmy's Chapter 1 and without the bold highlights in your chapter 1. I guess this is a personal preference.

J.S.Watts
A DARKER MOON

Larry789 wrote 1379 days ago

I'm awed by the sheer size and scope of this undertaking, I know the amount of time I spend researching for my books, this book beats mine in time involved. The premise is outstanding, the predictions are scary but possible and that makes them more fearful. Good work glad I backed it.

Paul T. wrote 1379 days ago

I applaud your breadth of vision and imagination. However, I found it very difficult to read. The narrative went slowly, and failed to capture my imagination as a such a big idea should have done. The frequent use of bold type broke up what flow there was and made it more difficult to get into the story.
You do have a lot of good material, but I think you need to consider a different structure that will make it more accessible. As it stands, sorry, but I don't feel I can back this.

vincent johnson wrote 1379 days ago

I got stopped cold with the anonymous 'they' in 'they teach new man all they know.'
I had to keep rereading the SUMMARY to discover who 'they' were.
As a tech writer you should not puzzle me with a pronoun like that. Naughty, naughty.

In the 'Forward' section did you mean to say 'Foreword'?

'A butterfly flapping its wings ... ' I used a similar metaphor in a short story years ago. Yes, we know that actions have consequences of which we may be unaware. In my analogy a snow bird alights on a twig and that tiny vibration precipitates an avalanche that wipes out an entire village if evil-doers. Come on!

'who's mother tongue is not English ...' Hmm, did you mean to say 'whose'?
--------------------------------------------------
In spite of these weeds in the literary garden I plunge forward!

vincent johnson wrote 1379 days ago

I got stopped cold with the anonymous 'they' in 'they teach new man all they know.'
I had to keep rereading the SUMMARY to discover who 'they' were.
As a tech writer you should not puzzle me with a pronoun like that. Naughty, naughty.

In the 'Forward' section did you mean to say 'Foreword'?

'A butterfly flapping its wings ... ' I used a similar metaphor in a short story years ago. Yes, we know that actions have consequences of which we may be unaware. In my analogy a snow bird alights on a twig and that tiny vibration precipitates an avalanche that wipes out an entire village if evil-doers. Come on!

'who's mother tongue is not English ...' Hmm, did you mean to say 'whose'?
--------------------------------------------------
In spite of these weeds in the literary garden I plunge forward into what I think will be a marvelous journey.

vincent johnson wrote 1379 days ago

I got stopped cold with the anonymous 'they' in 'they teach new man all they know.'
I had to keep rereading the SUMMARY to discover who 'they' were.
As a tech writer you should not puzzle me with a pronoun like that. Naughty, naughty.

In the 'Forward' section did you mean to say 'Foreword'?

'A butterfly flapping its wings ... ' I used a similar metaphor in a short story years ago. Yes, we know that actions have consequences of which we may be unaware. In my analogy a snow bird alights on a twig and that tiny vibration precipitates an avalanche that wipes out an entire village if evil-doers. Come on!

'who's mother tongue is not English ...' Hmm, did you mean to say 'whose'?
--------------------------------------------------
In spite of these weeds in the literary garden I plunge forward!

vincent johnson wrote 1379 days ago

I got stopped cold with the anonymous 'they' in 'they teach new man all they know.'
I had to keep rereading the SUMMARY to discover who 'they' were.
As a tech writer you should not puzzle me with a pronoun like that. Naughty, naughty.

In the 'Forward' section did you mean to say 'Foreword'?

'A butterfly flapping its wings ... ' I used a similar metaphor in a short story years ago. Yes, we know that actions have consequences of which we may be unaware. In my analogy a snow bird alights on a twig and that tiny vibration precipitates an avalanche that wipes out an entire village if evil-doers. Come on!

'who's mother tongue is not English ...' Hmm, did you mean to say 'whose'?
--------------------------------------------------
In spite of these weeds in the literary garden I plunge forward!

theweed wrote 1380 days ago

A SHORT HISTORY - 7/14/2010

I applaud you for your diligent research into history. Summarizing such an extensive list of events would be difficult. However, some of the depravity you mention in more recent history was not unknown to previous civilizations. New technologies just enabled the greed and exploitation to prosper.

Your premise outlines a not so rosy picture of our future. The scenes you lay out are quite credible and realistic. I like the way you expose the frailties of humanity to personal advantage, wandering in the dark in search of the unknown. I think this reflects our own insecurities in that none of us really knows where he came from, and more importantly, why.

But, like so many attempts at painting the future, this book is founded on the single assumption of the existence of a grand deity. Other theories are overlooked and not considered at all. I understand that your aim was to present a viable construct of humanity's future based upon your own beliefs. I can accept that and find your story fascinating. I'm disappointed that it is confined to such a narrow view of history.

I am amused as the new order of things as the new man attempts to establish rules relating to a more contemporary morality. As I read on, I see the fallacy of this as an impossibility. As long as the human mind makes rules, another human mind will contrive a way to break them.

Ingenious insight into our present state of existence. Good luck with this.

Marc - Where's The Ivy

Bobbee wrote 1380 days ago

Interesting, different, odd. What a stupendous accomplishment.
Shelved.

Bobbee\Kali's Daughters

Laurel Lamperd wrote 1380 days ago

Well written, Andrew. You would have committed yourself to a lot of research to write this book as well as having a huge interest in your subject. I hope you have the book published. All the best with it.
I'll back it.
Laurel
www.authorsden.com/laurellamperd

Anna Pescardot wrote 1380 days ago

Very interesting and thought provoking. Compelling reading. Happy to back. Good luck.

Anna

SingingOwl wrote 1381 days ago

Thank you so much for backing "Finding Little Big Foot." I've put you on my watchlist and will read soon. The pitch has me...wondering.

acmlee wrote 1381 days ago

Hi Andrew - Just checked out the first few chapters of 'A Short History Of A Long Future' as promised.
It sure is curious but reads well! Like the non-fiction feel of the narrative and the short well constructed chapters. Love the cover art but feel that the pitch could be better - perhaps buliding on the first sentence of the 2nd paragraph. Just a thought - not a complaint! Backed.
Adrian Lee

Duncan Watt wrote 1383 days ago

Hi Andrew ...

This is a great peice of work that certainly makes one think. You have obviously studied your subject well and put a great deal of research into your book. I would certainly cut the biographical tag as this would need to be about your life, when clearly it is about your beliefs.

Two other suggestions to make, You make it appear that white men are the only 'slave keepers' when Muslims, Egyptians Rmans and indeed the ancient Greeks were all 'at it'whilst the white man was still living in caves.

Finally: the use of so much 'bold type' tends to draw the eye until I found I was skipping down the page reading the bold type only.

I apologise for my pickiness, a very good Idea. Loved the pun Dr J Ova ... 'Backed'. All the Best. Regards ... Duncan.

greeneyes1660 wrote 1384 days ago

Andrew, You left no stone unturned. I think this is a masterpiece and though fiction, which often imitates life as I think this does on many levels, truly stimulates the mind. This is thought provoking and the amount of time and work you put into this is clearly eminent.

Your voice is direct, yet soothing. It is almost hypnotic in spots. I think this is one book people will be talking about for genertions to come. It reminds me of the type of book that will have an impact like Dyanectics did when it first came out. Bravo Backed Patricia aka Columbia Layers of te Heart

Linda Lou wrote 1384 days ago

hullo Andrew. This is all a bit complex for my simple mind but it does appear as though you have well addressed all of the various religious, scientific, evolutionary, and technological ideas and given them cohesive flow. Very interesting concept.
Linda Lou Long
http://www.authonomy.com/ViewBook.aspx?bookid=11421

Balepy wrote 1384 days ago

Andrew - A short history etc is all the writers below have raved about and I add mine to this most extraordinary story. I do apologise for the delay in backing your book but my pc crashed and has only just been coaxed back to life! Keep writing - can only succceed. Balepy (Freckles the Fawn)

E A M Harris wrote 1385 days ago

This sounds like an interesting idea, but I don't see how a work can be fiction and biography. Even if you include real people that just makes it a historical novel.

I think you're wrong about the Jews 'guarding their god' - at one time theirs was a proselytizing religion.

Cheers
Elaine

holdril wrote 1387 days ago

Considering your background and the scientific pretext on which you fiction is based one should not be surprised that you chose a font san serif. You should be told that readers prefer a font wit a serif. It makes reading easier. I am sure that is why publishers chose such fonts,
With repect of the story, great and thanksfor backing my volume.

Rakhi wrote 1387 days ago

This is one of the most fascinating and compelling books I have seen on this site. I wish I had more time to digest everything as this is certainly well researched and well imagined. The logic behind these concepts is quite appealing.
Backed with pleasure.
Rakhi (Sir William...)

D.S. Williamson wrote 1388 days ago

Fascinating...

Mark Mane wrote 1388 days ago

Thank you for backing my novel. I have taken a look at yours and find it fascinating. I am very pleased to back it. I will read more of it this evening. Interesting approach.

Mark Mane Kidnapped: The President's Family and other titles.
.

Niobrara Kardnova wrote 1388 days ago

Hard for me to critique this one. It is creative, yes, and taken as fiction I should probably back it, but I couldn't get past the synopsis of all the cosmology and history up to our time. It may be written as analogy to simplify things for new-man, but it is biased, ethnocentric and flat out wrong! Of course I have issues with the original Bible as well, so don't go by me.

Niobrara Kardnova (The Trouble with Wives)

Jim Darcy wrote 1388 days ago

Fascinating concept, well thought-out and intriguing. Definitely puts the science in sci-fi.
Jim Darcy
The Firelord's Crown

andrewvecsey wrote 1389 days ago

Interesting title, but I found the material itself to be teflon; I just couldn't get my attention to stick to it.

Dear Ms Scrambled EggHead. I'm very sorry for you.Try sniffing some glue and have another read.

Ysabetwordsmith wrote 1389 days ago

Interesting title, but I found the material itself to be teflon; I just couldn't get my attention to stick to it.

mongoose wrote 1391 days ago

Intriguing. I actually love this kind of thing but confess I hate reading it on screen....well, hate reading EVERYTHING on screen but the deep thinking stuff more than most. Do really like what you're doing though and have backed this for sure and certain.

A Knight wrote 1391 days ago

I found this premise to be fascinating. Right from the start, I was enthralled by the sheer effort and, beneath that, the thought that had gone into creating this piece. Not only that, but you keep your characters real and approachable, a human link to the compelling plot that acts as an undercurrent for this book.

Backed with pleasure.
Abi xxx

Valley Woman wrote 1391 days ago

Andrew, you are gifted with compassion and a poetic talent. When I read your synopsis I was expecting a dry science fiction novel that would have soared above my head, but I find your writing exquisite. I wish you the best with this novel and I'm shelving it with pleasure.

I found one typo towards the end of chapter one, "difiant children" should read defiant children.

I will read one more chapter.

Patricia
All Saints' Day

LeClerc wrote 1391 days ago

Hi Andrew,

this has got to be one of the best pieces of fiction on the site. I want more and I am looking forward to the day you upload some additions. Reality, fiction, theology; are we sure you are not a robot?
Backed.

Phil
Danny Murphy

Antonius wrote 1391 days ago

dear Andrew,
again, please dont think this as a put down, though god knew, people take what i say about loving pulp fiction and such as a insult, but it never is. Your book recalled in me , as I try to finish up the books i have open and then take a break, tremendously and with grace in me, well and sweetly of great ancient and medieval books. I say here, perhaps insulting again, not meaning to, it had the great lovely attributes of works of the dark ages,-- I know it sounds bad, but , it did have the lovelorn rough, textural, what is the word,...? Resurgimanto quality of someone grasping for truth in the darkness, towards the light, as i said to a reverend it doesnt matter if i agree with you, its doenst matter, AS i am not working fora war profiteer and thus dont not have the luxury of Commercially supported belief systems. But, rather do you agree with you,,,do you think this or that and why....? It had a touch of the wondrous and beloved by me, hated by English teachers of course , Pliny, as it recalled in me a new kind of Natural History, it doesnt matter if its true, or if its all blarney its compellingly so and that all that matters, at least to me, if not to haper collins, who of course, like all hypocrites sand buccaneers and bribers and thought controllers and politician sci hacks, deals in "Truth', whatever that is explained to be at that time.

Best,
Tony