Book Jacket

 

rank 5904
word count 34165
date submitted 14.07.2010
date updated 22.07.2010
genres: Fiction, Historical Fiction, Childr...
classification: universal
complete

PEASANT REBEL

Paul McGuire

A fourteenth century peasant youth is catapulted into the centre of the Peasants' Revolt, one of the most dramatic episodes of British history.

 

Set in late 14th C England, this is an all-action, fast-moving middle-grade historical tale that will also appeal to adults.

Readers will identify with Spragg, a peasant youth who takes a literal and metaphorical journey beyond his traditional boundaries that simultaneously stretches his view of the world and challenges- and then confirms - his convictions and beliefs. On the way his story unfolds at the very heart of social and economic forces that changed England for ever.

Tthe young Page of a rebel Lord, monks, villagers and vagabonds join forces to confront the most powerful forces of the middle ages with little more than their wits and simple weaponry.

Within the main plot are sub-plots of romance and political intrigue woven around what is left of the historical record. The central question remains: will the rebellion succeed for each of the main characters?

 
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adventure, best seller, canterbury, children, drama, editor's desk, fiction, fourteenth century, historical fiction, history, middle grade, peasants' ...

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Blackheath seethed with a mass of sweaty rebels carrying tools and makeshift weapons, mostly of wood, as men and boys alike jostled for position on the crowded plain. Spragg had not imagined so many people in the whole of England.

On a small rise, towards the edge of the sea of heads, he spotted Tyler’s standard fluttering in the breeze outside a makeshift tent.  It took him almost an hour to fight through the crowd.  The rebel leader stumbled from his tent reeking of alcohol.     

    “Welcome to hell, boy.  Did you find your friend?”  Without waiting for an answer, Tyler swept his arms in an arc above his head.  “Look yonder. I’d warrant there be over ten thousand of England’s finest … and worst out there,” he chuckled. “I’ve sent my lieutenant, Jack Straw, to Mile End to gather even more.”  He lurched towards Spragg, just managing to grab the flagstaff to steady himself.

    Spragg turned away in disgust.  His father liked to drink a flagon or two of beer, especially on holy days, but he never got blind drunk. 

    “Guy can’t be found,” he spat before turning away.  “But I won’t give up.” Tyler’s dismissive attitude irritated him. The throbbing of his old wolf-bite wound did nothing to lighten his mood. 

    Spragg hadn’t eaten for hours, so he went in search of food. Even the putrid stink of human waste and unwashed bodies failed to blunt his appetite  He begged a handful of bread from a burly farmer and wriggled into a tiny space next to him. 

“Come far, boy?” hailed a voice from over his shoulder. In front of Spragg stood an old man leaning on a stout staff.  His first reaction was to turn away.  Then he remembered Guy’s talk of chivalry and relented.

“Not far.  And you, brother?”

“Followed my three boys here.  The young rascals be spoiling for a fight.  They follow their friends like lovesick sheep.”  Spragg suspected that this man’s sons were not the only ones on the heath caught up in a frenzy they did not fully understand. 

Before Spragg had a chance to respond, shouts rang out and everyone around them sprang to their feet.  Tyler and about a dozen of his men were riding off in the direction of the river.  Without a horse, Spragg had no option but to shuffle forward with the crowd.  At least he was near the front.  He feared for anybody trapped in the middle.

When they reached the banks of the Thames, Spragg pushed and elbowed his way towards Tyler who was swaying unsteadily as he stood on the edge of the river.

“What’s happening?” he shouted to Tyler above the noise. 

“I sent word to the King to meet us hereabouts today or surrender the throne,” he smirked.

Spragg felt arms and hands push from behind and, turning round, realised everyone’s attention was fixed on a point upstream.  He strained forward and watched a highly-decorated vessel veer slowly around the river bend toward them. 

The royal barge was a magnificent sight.  Rich tapestries hung from the roof, brightly-coloured silks draped the sides. A ghostly hush descended on the crowd as the vessel silently glided towards them.  Spragg caught sight of the King seated on a golden throne, dressed in dazzling regal finery.  As his eyes searched the deck, Spragg’s heart leapt.  The slight figure standing just behind Richard looked like Guy.  A second glance confirmed it. 

He rejoiced to know that his friend was still alive.  But what on God’s earth was he doing here? As the barge moved close to the bank, he could see his friend was distracted and tense.  Head bowed, his eyes never left the deck of the barge. 

King Richard stood up and strode to the bow. He scanned the massed ranks almost spilling into the river.

“My loyal subjects,” he began.  “I rejoice to see so many gathered here in this place.  What brings you hence, that you would speak with me so urgently?”

Tyler stumbled forward, and placed a hand on his sword. 

“These men you see before you be your true Commons, your Majesty.  They demand justice against your  government.  We have come with a list of demands by your leave.”

Richard studied the shore and realised he had too few armed men at his disposal to defeat such a number.  He puffed out his chest and stared up at Tyler.      “And who are you to make demands on the royal person?”

Tyler mopped his brow. 

“It matters not who I be.”  Cramper moved next to the king and whispered in his ear, as he continued.  “Come ashore sire, and parley with us. We mean you no harm.”  Spragg was grudgingly impressed with this cheeky display, and this from a man hardly able to stand only minutes ago.

Cramper approached the King once more, this time more urgently.  Richard nodded before turning back to shore. 

“My advisors will not allow it.”  Murmurs spread through the crowd. Spragg was jostled and the discontented rumbling grew more urgent.  Without warning, two scythes splashed in the water, not far from the barge. 

John Ball pushed Tyler aside, and raised his fist.  “Then send us John of Gaunt and heathen Archbishop Sudbury, and we’ll leave you in God’s peace.  Aye and while you are about it, send that poll-tax thief, your treasurer Bancroft.”  

“We want action,” Spragg shouted to cheers from behind.

At that, Tyler pulled down his pants and an arc of urine splashed into the river.  Jeers and laughter rang out all around. “That’s what I think of thieving High-borns,” he spluttered, winking at Spragg.

Richard blanched and turned to face a group of dignitaries at the rear of the barge. 

More farm tools and makeshift weapons were hurled from the bank into the river, this time landing even closer.  A line of royal soldiers guarding the sides of the barge drew their arrows, waiting for the order to fire.  Tyler pulled up his trousers and raised his hand in an attempt to stop the onslaught of flying debris, but buckets, pitchforks, and all manner of objects now rained into the water.

The barge pulled away and began to head back downriver followed by mocking cries from the bank.  The mob was baying for blood.  Spragg watched the frown deepen on Tyler’s brow.     

Turning to face the peasants, Spragg bellowed.  “We’ll not be so easily pushed aside, even by a king.  Follow us to the city gates!”

Tyler called Spragg over to him.  “Hop up boy, ride with me. At least now we know where Guy is.”  Spragg perched uneasily on the rear of Tyler’s saddle, squeezed his thighs and placed his hands carefully on the shoulders of the rider.

As the horse skittered nervously through the throng, Spragg pictured the uncomfortable look on Guy’s face as he stood on the barge. He wondered what information had been forced out of him.  Telling himself guessing was useless, he told himself instead to concentrate on staying on the horse.

Four hours later, the advance party arrived on the east bank of the Thames at Tabard Inn in Southwark. They waited impatiently for some foot-weary reinforcements to catch up, before heading for the southern approach to London BridgeTyler told Spragg the bridge would be heavily guarded, and his worst fears were realised when they saw a large group bearing arms blocking the path as the river came into view.

Taking the lead, Tyler reined in his horse, at the head of the main group and stood defiant before the reception committee. 

“Good day to you, yeomen.  Don’t be fooled by my present company.  There be thousands of men not an hour away. We seek entry to the city, and be warned that before this day is through the city will be in our hands.”

To Spragg’s surprise, a man dressed in the heavy robes of a city alderman smiled. “We welcome you and your men to the city of London.  For days we have heard of your coming and bid you safe passage.” 

Behind the brightly-clad official Spragg could see several Guildsmen.  He had seen such men pass through the manor, seeking food or shelter when about their business on the road. 

Tyler’s grin spread from ear to ear as he led the first group of peasants across London Bridge.  Many began cheering and banging mallets and spades or whatever came to hand in a symphony of triumph.  For several hours, wave after wave of rebels followed. 

Travelling up the Watling Road, the leading group halted in a courtyard in the giant shadow of the city cathedral.  It was there that more men confronted Spragg and Tyler, this time less friendly.

It was the Lord Mayor William Walworth who spoke.  “By order of the King’s Regent and the burghers of London, I command this rabble to disperse.” 

Tyler laughed in his face.

“There’ll be no dispersing.  But don’t worry. My men are no rabble and I have given orders. There’ll be no trouble.”  Spragg recognised the sly look in Tyler’s eyes and thought his words false.  He remembered no orders and even if Tyler really had issued them, Spragg thought, he doubted the victorious rebels would be in any mood to obey.

 

Chapters

17

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iandsmith wrote 803 days ago

Paul, As far as I can tell, this novel should, "engage the mind of young readers". Seems like a good effort to me. The action's well written, I can picture Spragg, the Wat Tyler revolt is as relevant as it's ever been, and there aren't any grammar errors. Not much to comment on really. Well done - Ian

GriffinsMustFly wrote 1082 days ago

Nice...very nice...from the first chapter you weave an intricate tale already. Keep it up, and keep promoting, and you'll have a publishing contract sooner or later, I think :)

hockgtjoa wrote 1145 days ago

I enjoyed this very much despite an occasional lapse in agreement between who was speaking and who was spoken tow (I suggest you proof read by reading aloud to some one else or vice versa). I would also make sure to have each chapter tell enough of the story to make it a satisfying episode--think of TV episodes. Some of the chapters currently fall short. Four stars.

RonParker wrote 1239 days ago

Hi Paul,

I'm not a fan of historical fiction, but this is good and I shall certainly be returning to read more when I have the time. You have obviously spent a consierable amount of time on research.

There are, espeially in chapter 3, a few pov issues, but I'm sure you can sor these out in a re-draft.

One small continuity point, in chapter one, you give sprags age as 15, but in a later chapter he says he is four years older than 12, which would make him 16. A minor point but the kind of thing readers pick up on.

Ron

WendyB wrote 1304 days ago

Your pedantic pitch and first chapter heading don't do your work justice.
This is an appealing book for young people and adults alike.
It has an attractive, familiar period voice, and the subject is an interesting one.
Well done.

Wendy Bertsch
(Once More...From the Beginning)

TuesdaysChild wrote 1313 days ago

The writing is clear, crisp, gives the reader something to wrap their mind around. If I had more time, I'd read more, but I'm trying to catch up with dozens of requests! Good writing here. Backed.

shornexe wrote 1317 days ago

A strong opening chapter. Nice touches with the historical details that do just enough to set the scene without becoming overtly instructional. I suspect Spragg will prove to be a witty, resourceful and likeable character.
Well written stuff, backed with pleasure.
Shaun
The Six Acts

Joanna Carter wrote 1318 days ago

I found this engaging, atmospheric and well written. On my shelf.
Joanna
Fossil Farm

lj reads wrote 1319 days ago

It seems scary. You're obviously not afraid to write about anything. Descriptive. Good for you Paul!

Sly80 wrote 1322 days ago

Spragg encounters one of the 'fancy folk' but in dire circumstances. Having taken him to the healer, he's off again the next day to see the results. Instead he finds another wounded creature, and by helping the she-wolf, has perhaps earnt himself some dangerous allies. He shows even more cunning when covering for the injured page. But the friar finds them with the message, and young Guy must decide who to trust...

Lively, colourful writing of the kind that will engage any child's imagination: 'his white naked backside as flabby as a vat of baker's dough', 'scraggly hair exploding in random directions', 'seven snarling shapes ghosted into view'. This is an authentic introduction to a time and place in history which comes alive through the various characters, and in particular, Spragg, a street-wise kid in a time before 'streets' as we know them. There's a slight flourish of fantasy with his helping of the wolf, but that just adds to the thrills that children will get from this absorbing and exciting story ... backed.

Possible nits: 'pushing towards the morning light ... pushed through a tangle ... pushed these thoughts'. There's no sign or mention of Magda when the boys meet again at her hut. There are quite a few M names: Magda, Modrag, Moldwood, Mayweather; the first 2 being particularly easy to confuse.

mvw888 wrote 1325 days ago

Wonderful sense of time and place, and a plot that begins in the middle of the action, right from the start. You have a direct yet descriptive style that moves along at a pleasing pace. The discovery of the injured boy is an intriguing start, and you hint at Spragg's past in a way that leaves us wanting more, in a good way. (Although I couldn't help but think that that early wolf bite may lead to some werewolf type of plot--I think that's a result of reading so many books here on authonomy :-).) Well done. Really enjoyed this.

---Mary
The Qualtiies of Wood

paperbat wrote 1326 days ago

Good afternoon Paul.
I read half a dozen chapters of your book and found it very easy to the eye. The pcae was good, as was the characterisation of young Spagg. You obviously know and researched your medieval history, so you could paint a realistic picture for the reader to enter.
The best comment you have, however, is when you say as an introduction '' The central question remains: will the rebellion succeed for each of the main characters''. Now this is key, because as we know the actual outcome, one can not expect a surpise there. However for the individuals, we must weight and see or sohould I say read the whole book!
Excellent. BACKED.

I would really appreciate if you could reciprocate and read some of my childrens' book called Adventures of the Paperbats''.
Many thanks. Jerry [paperbat]

Daniel Manning wrote 1330 days ago

Lord Moldwood sends out an urgent coded message, but its intercepted by the regents men, leaving only one assigned to do the job still alive. A peasant boy helps the high born to safety, and together they set out to deliver the message.
Treminology such as high born and tax coin means the class system and money were unknown entities but issues such as taxation are the causes of friction between those of the noble class, and the peasantry. Lets hope the message triggers another poll tax riot. We see the peasant boy benevolent of all living things, while the high born is trained for adventure and war, so the story is as informative as it is entertaining.
Nicely written period piece that endeavours to retain authenticity, crucial if the object is to educate as well as entertain which I think the story does so successfully, so for that reason it has my backing.
Daniel Manning
No Compatibility.
Minor typos Chapter two: The path fmeandered through abandoned fields covered in weeds and corn stubble.
Chapter four: Spragg hesitated but he remained determined to act 'You'll need to k...'

CarolinaAl wrote 1335 days ago

Your brilliant, dynamic story grabbed me and kept me riveted. Credible characters. Crisp dialogue that evokes the era. Vital writing. I absolutely love this thoughtfully composed story. Backed.

nsllee wrote 1336 days ago

sorry, I meant Monty Python and the Holy Grail, of course.

Nicole

nsllee wrote 1336 days ago

Hi Paul

I enjoyed this. I don't usually go for mediaeval tales with everyone wandering around covered in mud and rough homespun like extras from Life of Brian, but you manage to pull it off and engage the reader. Spragg is a very sympathetic hero and it's great the way you introduce new introduce into each chapter - Magda, the wolves, the political element. Very nicely done. Backed.

Nicole
Chosen

John Warren-Anderson wrote 1340 days ago

Great opening chapter, full of action, suspense, and attmosphere. And it finishes with a laugh.
That reminded me of a Dave Alan joke.
"If you don't suck the poison out your friend will die."
"What did the doctor say?"
"He said you're going to die."
Backed

Lisa Scullard wrote 1343 days ago

Peasant Rebel is a really good Young Adult historical read - immediately involving, shows the author's writing experience straight away. Would appeal to fans of the 'Robin Hood' genre era.

All the best (and sorry for the wait returning the read),
Lisa (Death And The City)

homewriter wrote 1343 days ago

What a gripping start. I love historical fiction and you write it so well. Brilliant. I reall like Spragg already! Well worth returning for more! Gordon - The Harpist of Madrid, also an historical novel

homewriter wrote 1343 days ago

What a gripping start. I love historical fiction and you write it so well. Brilliant. I reall like Spragg already! Well worth returning for more! Gordon - The Harpist of Madrid, also an historical novel

theweed wrote 1344 days ago

PEASANT REBEL - 8/11/2010

The pitch does not do justice to the story. It could be much more effective by reflecting the suspense and action. The story does start out with a bang and keeps going. I like the imagery and descriptions, but the details of the plant life might be a bit overdone. The MC is a good anchor for the story, appealing to the young adult and full of pride and defiance. But, the "mud-brown eyes" are not exactly a good complement for him. Mud just doesn't inspire likability.

Dialogue is well done, just enough of the vernacular to place the story in the time frame, but no to the point of rendering it unreadable. The plot is sound and includes enough twists and complications to keeps a reader's interest. A good young adult read. Good luck with it.

Marc - Where's The Ivy

Wilma1 wrote 1350 days ago

There is something highly engaging about your book. Chapter one sets us a challenge to find out what’s in the pouch and who it is to be delivered to. Spragg’s encounter with the wolves is both magical and scary at the same time. We are left in no doubt that Spragg is special and will encounter many challenges. If my shelf were not so full I would read more than the two chapters as your book promises a gifted story

Wilma1
Knowing Liam Riley – I hope you can spare a moment to take a look

Walden Carrington wrote 1352 days ago

Paul,
Peasant Rebel is a well-researched and riveting historical with universal appeal. Backed with pleasure.

Eveleen wrote 1356 days ago

Backed
Lenny Harry
(Like a dot on the horizon)

Benjamin Dancer wrote 1358 days ago

I backed your book a few days ago based on chapter one, came back and read through chapter five. I'll to come back for more tomorrow. Great job with names and evoking a sense of place. Good luck!

Benjamin Dancer

Muggins100 wrote 1361 days ago

Thanks so much for your kind message. Much appreciated.
Paul M.

Peasant Rebel
A must read for historical fiction fans,young and old! Reminiscent of Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth". Well researched and great pace. Loved it.
Alison Butler

Butler's Girl wrote 1361 days ago

Peasant Rebel
A must read for historical fiction fans,young and old! Reminiscent of Ken Follett's "Pillars of the Earth". Well researched and great pace. Loved it.
Alison Butler

andrew skaife wrote 1363 days ago

HI. I really enjoyed this and I can see it having a wider audience than just YA. I have been a teacher of English for many years and would have appreciated writing of this quality to engage my students, too many of whom are fading away from reading altogether. This would certainly have been a welcome addition to my lesson plan resources but would also have been something the students could have taken home for themselves.

You manage to create a strong and vibrant character in Spragg that will carry the narrative easily along. I am also a father of four who actively sought to turn the kids to reading. They would have loved this.

Excellent stuff and you set your time period in stone.

BACKED.

Elizabeth Wolfe wrote 1364 days ago

You have an exceptionally beautiful cover and a good pitch. These elements make the reader want more. I enjoy this historical period. You've done an excellent writing job here.

BACKED
Elizabeth Wolfe
Would you consider backing MEMORIES OF GLORY? I thank you for taking a look.

mariecapri wrote 1365 days ago

Hi Paul. You flash out your characters really well. Spragg is really great and Magda a great contrast. You have caught the era in a contemporary way through your writing, which lows well. Backed and best of luck! Maria (Cosmic Linx)

LintonWood wrote 1366 days ago

As a fan and writer of historical fiction, it was only right and proper that I looked in. I like your contemporary style, which manages to maintain period authenticity in its words. I also like Spragg, I reckon he might just grow up into my kind of scum! One or two parts could be trimmed a little, but I reckon you can pick those up yourself. I am all for the idea of historical fiction for children.
Best wishes and good luck,
Linton

DP Walker wrote 1366 days ago

Hi Paul
A charming piece of writing with some wonderful visual imagery. This is entertaining and educational as well - quite original. I wasn't sure which age group it was aimed as some of the language might be tricky for younger children. Overall, I loved it and I'm sure my kids would too.
DP Walker
Five Dares

celticwriter wrote 1366 days ago

Hey Paul, love the genre. Nice story telling. Backed.

blessings,
jim
jack & charmian london

name falied moderation wrote 1366 days ago

Dear Paul
I did, yes comment and back this book a few days ago, however I cannot find the backing. I believe this book is worth taking the trouble to do it again, so I am. BEST OF LUCK

Denise
The Letter

Paul_aucuparius wrote 1366 days ago

Hi Paul
I'm enjoying your writing - an unusual genre.

klouholmes wrote 1367 days ago

Hi Paul, This took me right to the time and the action began swiftly. You've incorporated Spragg's background, his being no stranger to death, easily into the developing plot. Interesting characters, the messenger and Morag. It's vivid and written so that Spragg's age level would become immersed too. Easily shelved - Katherine (The Swan Bonnet)

A Knight wrote 1367 days ago

Historical fiction for children is something you don't see very often, and you really have something amazing here. There's a real sense of the era, volatile and thrilling, and I adore seeing something that has such a firm foundation of research to hold up what promises to be a thrilling plot!

Backed with pleasure
Abi xxx

Muggins100 wrote 1367 days ago

Thanks Missy
Much appreciated. I will check your work out too. Hope you do manage more than three chapters as the action picks up!
Cheers
Paul

I'm a huge fan of historical fiction and this is detailed and well researched. I don't know much about English history so I also felt like I was learning something and it was fascinating. You've done a wonderful job, this had such a nice feel to it. Great job and I'm going to try and come back to read past the 3rd chapter.

Missy

missyfleming_22 wrote 1368 days ago

I'm a huge fan of historical fiction and this is detailed and well researched. I don't know much about English history so I also felt like I was learning something and it was fascinating. You've done a wonderful job, this had such a nice feel to it. Great job and I'm going to try and come back to read past the 3rd chapter.

Missy

Muggins100 wrote 1369 days ago

Chris
Really appreciate your comments and support. I Also love history and, like you, feel Wat Tyler deserves wider recognition and if my humble offering does this in a minor way then that will be very satisfying, I am a bit busy with many things right now but hope to return and repay comments such as yours with a serious consideration of their work. Once again, many thanks.
Paul

Paul, this is a great story and one that is hardly touched on by historical writers. Wat Tyler and the Peasant's Revolt is a period of history barely touched upon by storytellers OR historians and it's easy to see why. It was a near-revolution ahead of its time and nearly put paid to feudalism. Wat Tyler is one of the great unsung heroes of British history in my view and it's good that someone has marked him out. He was three centuries ahead of Cromwell, as were John Ball and the Lollards. Tyler was Trotsky to Ball's Lenin if you like. It was only because of the objective conditions of the time that they didn't succeed - it was, after all, a peasants' revolt. The peasantry were tied to the land and its seasons and could never sustain a campaign to any great length, but they came so close to giving history a shove. Thank you.
The writing is storytelling of the highest order and, I think, is accessible to ALL ages (I'm 54 and I liked it). The plot and characters are believable and fit the time period. The dialogue is great. It's on my shelf. Hope it gets published. Chris1

Chris 1 wrote 1369 days ago

Paul, this is a great story and one that is hardly touched on by historical writers. Wat Tyler and the Peasant's Revolt is a period of history barely touched upon by storytellers OR historians and it's easy to see why. It was a near-revolution ahead of its time and nearly put paid to feudalism. Wat Tyler is one of the great unsung heroes of British history in my view and it's good that someone has marked him out. He was three centuries ahead of Cromwell, as were John Ball and the Lollards. Tyler was Trotsky to Ball's Lenin if you like. It was only because of the objective conditions of the time that they didn't succeed - it was, after all, a peasants' revolt. The peasantry were tied to the land and its seasons and could never sustain a campaign to any great length, but they came so close to giving history a shove. Thank you.
The writing is storytelling of the highest order and, I think, is accessible to ALL ages (I'm 54 and I liked it). The plot and characters are believable and fit the time period. The dialogue is great. It's on my shelf. Hope it gets published. Chris1

mvw888 wrote 1370 days ago

Expertly done. You give the broader context, then you reel us in with your characters and place the story at a personal level. Great pacing, great descriptions and dialogue. Really enjoyed this.

---Mary
The Qualities of Wood

Craig Ellis wrote 1370 days ago

Beautifully written in a period context. Excellent description of the world and the plight of the MC within it (Spragg).Good hook with the package that was flung by the soldier, and the subsequent appearance of the boy looking for it.

Just a note: "peasants'" is spelled wrong in your short pitch.

Backed.

Craig Ellis
The Sun and the Saber

cutley wrote 1370 days ago

Welcome. I hope this thread on the forum helps: http://www.authonomy.com/Forum/posts_new.aspx?threadId=58801

Charles

Niobrara Kardnova wrote 1370 days ago

I think Peasant Rebel is a book that should do well with older children and young adult readers. You've assembled a colorful set of characters (Mad Magda's my favorite so far), constructed an adventurous plot line, and added bits of mystery to each section--Why were the soldiers attacked? What was in the leather case? Where do John Ball and the Lollards fit into the political alliances that are forming?, etc. I'd never heard of the Peasant's Revolt before, so any historical tidbits you could scour out were news to me. I also liked the setting you created--the facts about folk medicine, damp soil used as insulation and the like mixed in with the elements of fable, such as the wolves and, if one could call her such, Magda the witch gave a scary but convincing mood to the piece. Backed with pleasure.
Niobrara Kardnova (The Trouble with Wives)

SammySutton wrote 1370 days ago


Clever, Interesting, Very High Energy!

It doesn't feel as if you were tired when you wrote it.
Great imagery!
Spragg is an incredible character.

Paul,
...'beads of sweat oozed from his pores'... Love That!
Great Job!
Backed!
Good Luck!
Sammy Sutton
King Solomon's '13'

Jack Hughes wrote 1370 days ago

Fantastic! I studied the Peasant Revolt on 1381 on my history degree but this is the first story I have ever come across about Wat Tyler. You have a great style and excellent pace and a highly original story. Brilliant. Backed without hesitation, best of luck my friend.

Jack Hughes
Dawn of Shadows

Craig Phoenix wrote 1370 days ago

I liked this, good style and characters.

Backed

If you get the time could you take a look at 'Soulshadow' or 'Toby'

Craig Phoenix

Burgio wrote 1371 days ago

PEASANT REBEL
This is a good story. The opening scene is dramatic: the boar . . . the soldiers . . . the injured boy . . . Spragg is a good character; he’s both likable and sympathetic. The kind of character who is interesting to follow to see how everything plays out for him. Your writing style is good for this genre. You have a lot of things that need described but you know to keep descriptions to a minimum so your story keeps moving. Makes this an enjoyable read. I’m adding this to my shelf. Burgio (Grain of Salt).

name falied moderation wrote 1371 days ago

Dear Paul
You have done a lot of work for this book with regard to research I feel sure. CONGRATS on a really good read. Well crafted with a story that is so gripping and it is impossible to put down. I have not read it all but will carry on. Both your pitches are so good and the very thing that grabbed me and would not let me go till i read on.
BACKED BY ME FOR SURE
I do hope you will review my book, comment and most of all BACK it. but either way the BEST of luck with yours
Denise
The Letter

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