Book Jacket

 

rank 1593
word count 18751
date submitted 16.09.2010
date updated 11.12.2010
genres: Fiction, Thriller, Science Fiction,...
classification: moderate
incomplete

Binary Boys

Joshua M. Young

The Shogun's right hand man investigates an impossible murder and stumbles across a conspiracy that threatens to undermine galactic society.

 

Centuries from now, society has found a more humane way of dealing with murderers and rapists: Rather than execution, the criminals are given implants that allow a benevolent AI, Amida-Buddha, to control their bodies and counsel their minds inside the timeless reality of Dainichi, the cosmic buddha. The system has long thought to be foolproof, and the control of Amida absolute, until a former criminal-turned-monk murders one of his fellows in cold blood on a backwater world. Ellison, the Shogunate's top agent, is a man who has exposed countless conspiracies and thwarted dozens of rebellions before they began. A natural choice for the investigation, Ellison arrives on site to find that the murder is really only incidental to far more disturbing events.

 
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tags

1940s, ai, amida, artificial intelligence, big bang, binary, boys, buddha, buddhism, buddhist, computers, dainichi, ellison, film noir, future, galaxy...

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Part One: Bodies, Chapter One

 

 

I landed on Susanou later than I would have liked. A storm rolled in as soon as we hit orbit and made the starliner crew cranky about the idea of landing a shuttle down there. Course, if we were back on Earth, or Hellenica, or just about anywhere else, there'd be a beanstalk. Here, though? There was an anchor in the middle of Alexandria, and an anchor station in orbit, and nothing connecting the two. After the lumber bust in '49, the planet didn't have the cash to finish it or the traffic to even make an orbital elevator a good idea. I clenched my teeth and waited. There wasn't really any rush, I suppose. Dead men don't move very fast.

It was well after local midnight when I hit dirt. The storm had almost completely fallen apart, leaving just a few scraps of threadbare cloud to give the sky some character. It was a nice night, now that the storm had cleared, and I had picked up three or four hours from the time difference between Alexandria and Galactic Standard, so I decided to hoof it to my hotel. I left my bags at the spaceport with a dataspace note containing delivery instructions. After a moment's thought, I uploaded a kami to the local 'space and asked it to make sure the bags didn't leave with anyone they shouldn't. Sometimes people were stupid and did stupid things like stealing from the Shogun's Hand.

I'd been expecting a bit of a walk to the hotel. A "bit" was right; it the spaceport, such as it was,  was closer to the city center than you'd think. Probably a symptom of Alexandria being smaller than it appears to be; the city had never filled out the way the planners had hoped it would. Maybe half the buildings were in use these days. The rest sat empty along the outer edges of town, kept in decent repair only by automatic maintenance systems.

    Right now,  all that meant that I was wide awake and still a little wound up from a bumpy descent. The hotel bar was still open and a drink sounded damn good right about then.

And that's how I met Hestia.

I was drinking a stout that wasn't and she was drinking something that had more fruit in it than alcohol. She wore a sea green kimono tied with a broad obi of crimson silk and embroidered along the cuffs with the markings of the geisha's union; I wore my grey three-piece suit and a tie that hung around because it didn't know where else to go.

I stared . If she noticed, she didn't show it-- she was either used to it or didn't give a damn. She had eyes only for the girly cocktail in the long stemmed glass in front of her. When it was gone, she sighed, letting out air that had been crucial to her rigidity, and slumped against the bar, head resting on her arms. Honey-gold hair spilled over her shoulders in waves like an antique force shield.

Long night?” I asked.

My client,” she said, without lifting her head, “is a dick.”

Aren't they all?”

She humored me with a laugh. Didn't have much spirit in it, though, and it wasn't much of a  laugh. More like a chuckle, or maybe a well-intentioned, “Heh.”

Small world for a geisha.”

One arm worked its way upright, and the geisha turned her head enough to stare at the embroidered silver shamisen on her cuff with a look that bordered on shock. “Small worlds have clients, too. Sometimes, they're even worth paying the starliner fares.” Fingers flexed and stretched, clearly bored with this. “You don't look so hot yourself.”

Fresh off the boat.” I fidgeted with my beer. It sloshed around in the bottom of the mug like dirty water, picking up and leaving foam in odd places.

Where from?”

Hellenica. Business trip.”

Business? On Susanou?”

Impossible, I know.” I drained my glass and frowned. A good stout just about takes a knife and fork to drink; this stuff was only slightly thicker than the air I was breathing.

The drinks here are awful,” the geisha said. The rogue arm tucked her hair behind an ear and I finally got a good look at her face. It was a nice face, even plastered against a bar. Exotic. Almond eyes  and pale, Nordic skin.

But yet you drink them.” I had smokes on me somewhere. Good ones, South Carolina tobacco rolled in Jiangxi rice paper. Hand rolled. Expensive. I pawed pockets, shook the coat laying on the stool next to me, growled an oath. “And you drink them here.”

The geisha inhaled to restore some rigidity to her frame and offered me a cigarette from somewhere inside her kimono. The front hung open a little more than it had before, and I appreciated that more than I appreciated the smoke, which had been rolled in something that should have been lining a starship hull.

Thanks.”

Alcohol,” she informed me, suddenly prim, “need not be good. It need only get me drunk.”

That's one way to look at it, I suppose.” I helped myself to a book of matches laying on the bar and lit up. It lit up okay, but tasted damned awful.

As always, a kami whispered in my ear, throwing hints about cigarettes and toxins and carcinogens into the dataspace in front of me. I waved the window away in annoyance. One day, I'd train them not to do that, and I'd do it without Alexander's words.

The barkeep dropped another drink in front of the geisha. Identical, every piece of fruit where it had been the first time around. Maybe the bar bought the glasses like that, fruit and all. Maybe he was just good at arranging fruit. I don't know, and it didn't matter-- either way, the geisha was dead set on destroying it.

I watched her for a little bit longer, but the conversation, such as it was, had fizzled and I was tired. I sent a kami off to pay my tab and another one to lay a trail to my room.

The geisha looked over her shoulder as I followed the trail out of the bar. She looked a little too hard and a little too long and at least one of my surveillance kami didn't care for that. A window spawned in the corner of my vision and the kami looped the video of her a couple times.

They were right. That look was a little too serious for a chance encounter. I spun a search out on  her and set a kami on it before crawling into bed.

 

The hotel kami was pitiless the next morning, hauling me out of bed with a noise like a tortured cat. To be fair, I had asked for the alarm-- I'm not particularly fair in the mornings, though. I dismissed the program and lay in bed for a few minutes, fighting the urge to go back to sleep. All told, I think I had snagged about three hours.

I showered, dressed, knocked back a couple stim pills and a cup of coffee.

Susanou had no clue I was here. Dataspace would be buzzing like Shibuya on a Friday night if the planetary government had caught wind of me last night. Good deal; showing up without giving your hosts a chance to tidy up makes for an easier investigation. To say nothing, of course, of watching them flail about in a panic when they realized that the Shogun's Hand was coming to look into things. Maybe I have a sadistic streak. Sue me.

Over breakfast, I tweaked my dataspace presence a little, reining in the kami that masked my identity and paid with my own name.

I had just about finished gnawing on a blackened bagel and was contemplating the runny egg on my plate when two men took a table across the room. Professional lookin' guys, well manicured and well dressed. Consummate business men, the both of them, except that neither had briefcases or any sort of work with them. Well, that and the fact that Susanou was out in the galactic boondocks with about as many business travelers as grandpa's back forty.

So, then. Local PD. Or the governor's idea of spooks. Or both, all rolled up into one neat little package. I went through the motions of lighting up in order to hide a smirk. Local boys are always the same-- cute, in the same sort of way that a six year old is cute when he thinks he's sly enough to get one over on the adults.

Except, in this case, dad not only knew what was going on, but the whole incident with little Johnny and the cookie jar was all part of the plan.

I allowed myself a few more minutes to smoke before deciding that the egg wasn't worth the risk of food poisoning. I dropped a napkin on the mess and walked out, leaving a kami hovering in the hotel dataspace to watch the cops.

A dataspace trail floated in the air in front of the hotel, laid by a kami to expedite my walk to the nearest monorail station. I stretched and yawned and set off along the line.

 

It poured on my way to the monorail station. It poured as I left the down-line monorail station. It poured as I walked to the Susanou regional government building, hat pulled low and coat pulled tight. It was a dark and stormy planet, Susanou, and I loved it for that. It had atmosphere, what with the frequent thunderstorms and untamed forests spanning entire continents, and I had a dramatic streak that reveled in it.

That's a useful thing, in my line of work. The flair for the dramatic, I mean. When it comes down to it, my job isn't quite so much to solve problems as it is to make damn sure the locals are terrified of Shogun Alexander and his bakufu. If all you do is show up and put an end to whatever scheming is going on right then, and you do it with no fanfare and no public notice, you don't really do anything that any old starship couldn't do with the proper application of an orbital lance.

On the other hand, if you send one guy in, alone, and that guy takes care of things with grace and style and stays just high enough profile to be quietly noticed, people worry. They know the bakufu's got jets enough to knock out a rebellion with one guy in a tie, and they start to worry about what the guys in fatigues and power armor are like. It's the extrapolation that keeps the brats in line, not the guns. No one wants to see what an actual battle with the Shogun is like. Probably not all that much worse than any other military action in the history of the modern galaxy, truthfully.

You'd never guess that from the way the regional government drones reacted when I stepped inside the offices, though. The receptionist gawked and security guards stiffened and dataspace went nuts with a blizzard of messages along the lines of, “Shit. Ellison's here.”

Me? I just dribbled rainwater on the carpet. Intimidating, I know. I yanked my hat off and flicked it a couple of times to get the water out of it, ran a hand through my hair and watched the place fall apart into virtual hysterics.

I am wired, you know,” I said to no one in particular.

The receptionist blushed. Dataspace fell silent and a trail emerged from all the mess. “Investigator--”

I know the way, thanks.”  It was tempting to throw my weight around out here, and keep throwing it around as I carved my way through the offices. Put people on edge. Terrorizing the receptionist and random passersby wouldn't really be worth it in the grand scheme of things, though. I settled for carving a swath of soggy destruction instead, transferring the path to the governor's office from dataspace to the real world in waterlogged carpeting.

 

The offices of Planetary Governor Offerhaus were pretty nice. Polished shelves of some dark wood I'd never seen-- native stuff, according to dataspace. Lots of books, though I got the feeling that inside the leather I'd find mostly Alexandria city council meeting minutes and collected tax reports for the past few decades.

The Governor himself had all the grace of beached whale stuffed into a silk suit and none of the charm. The only hair anywhere visible was a mustache like a wire brush growing out of his lip. It was a little jarring. Inappropriate, maybe.

He was impressively annoyed, though. He glared at me when I dropped my coat on a chair near the door and he kept glaring when I dropped myself into an arm chair in front of his desk. The ugly looks almost gave me pause when I lit up. Almost.

Investigator Ellison.”

'Ello, guv'na-- Aw, come on. I'm sure there's a sense of humor in there somewhere.”

We weren't really expecting the Shogun's Hand to come all this way.”

Well, travel's part of the business.”

Offerhaus drummed his fingers against his desk. They were strange fingers, narrow and free of fat and a little bit darker than the rest of him. I figured he'd stolen them from someone else and stuck them on the pudgy little fin he was calling a hand these days.  “You're an important man, Ellison. Why is Shogun Alexander wasting your time out here? For a murder?”

You know as well as I do,” I paused to suck down on my cigarette and skim over some bit of information offered up by one of my free-ranging kami, “that this wasn't just any old murder.”

I'm sure it was.”

Shaveling monks don't kill people, Offerhaus.”

Shavelings kill people all the time, Ellison.”

I yanked a sheet of paper off his desk to knock ash into. Somehow, he managed to look even more pissed. “Get an ashtray?” I suggested.

Silence.

Shavelings don't kill people,” I repeated. “They do before they become monks, but that's the whole point of the system, isn't it? Take the nembutsu implant and Amida-Buddha liberates you from all that squishy physicality stuff. Back here, in meatspace, there's no one home to do any killing anymore.”

Offerhaus squirmed. Maybe he was trying to roll back into the ocean.

You see why Alexander's concerned.”

He nodded.

And so you see why I'm here. If someone's messing with the system, that's trouble.”

The system is foolproof.”

Silly me. I'll call the boss up and let him know it's all A-okay. Can I borrow your ansible?”

Are you really trying to bully me, Ellison?”

It's what I do.” Innocent smile. Spread the hands, palms up. All that saintly iconography jazz.

Fingers came to a stop, except for the pointer finger. It must have missed the memo and kept drumming away without any accompaniment. “What do you want, Ellison?”

What a question.”

That last finger finally got the hint. It ground to a halt and bunched up into a fist with its fellows.

I've got a whole list, Governor. A long one. The headline is my fervent hope that, for once, you kids won't do that whole yappy little dog routine that you always do.” I took one last drag and snubbed the cigarette out on the sole of my shoe. “But I know that's not gonna happen, so I'll skip down to the part where you point me at the body and the suspect.”

It's been arranged, Investigator. The PD has assigned you a liaison.” He squared the papers on his desk and made a sound like an old engine not turning over. “Don't forget your coat. It's raining out there.”

 

They sent me two liaisons, actually-- my buddies from breakfast. Still immaculately dressed and neither of them looking the slightest bit damp. Me, after twenty minutes inside, I was still trying to figure out if there actually was a minnow swimming around in my shoe.

They fell into step with me as I left Offerhaus to stew. The door had barely slid shut when the guy on my left said, “Lt. Lambert. Susanou Planetary Police.” Lambert was a kid. He looked like he should still be off in cram school somewhere, prepping for exams, not arresting baddies-- not even  on a backwater colony world too new to have much in the way of crime.

His companion was an old guy, just as bald as the governor but a damn sight more lean. “Thornhill. Yoroshiku onegai shimasu,” he added, in formal Japanese. Didn't bother to bow or offer his hand, though.

Yoroshiku, fellows,” I replied. “So. Where are our boys?”

What's left of Harrison's in the morgue,” Thornhill said. “Hunter's at the temple.”

I wanted to stop walking and stare at him in disbelief. I didn't. Image is part of the job, after all. “You're telling me the suspect is sitting off in the woods outside Alexandria. Unsupervised.”

Lambert began ticking points off on his fingers. “A, We've got officers there. Two, Amida's in total control of him. And three, he's a binary boy, Investigator. Nirvana eyes. The whole deal. No one's home.”

I decided that I didn't like the kid. “Amida's not in control of him.”

Lambert cocked an eyebrow and made a face. The kid didn't seem to like me, either.

Knockin' off one of your own monks doesn't exactly seem very buddha-like, now does it?” I asked.

Thornhill ran a hand over his scalp. “You've got a point at that. I guess we should impound the monk.”

Nah. As long as he's still there, I'd like to see him in his native habitat.”

The receptionist went stiff when I stepped into the lobby and let loose a nervous sigh as I walked past. A kami brought it to my attention that she had slumped back against her chair as I headed to the exit. I felt bad. She was probably just some kid from some crappy university that didn't rate internship programs in real governments. 

Water still poured off the canopy outside in thick sheets, but there was a vehicle in police colors sitting underneath it this time. Calling it a car would have been flat out wrong, even if it ran along the ground on four wheels. This thing was a tank.

Well, maybe. I had the specs laid on top of it, with helpful little notes from a military-grade kami. Target here to disable steering, here to take out police sensors. “You kids park rangers?”

Lambert snorted. “Have you seen this planet, Ellison?”

Can't say that I have. Hard to see through that ocean that's falling out of the sky.”

Keep it up. The temple's a long drive. Longer walk, especially in the rain.”

It's not that I'm not used to being resented.  It's an occupational hazard, but then, so is being shot at, and I don't like that, either.

I put on my best innocent smile and asked a kami to start up the car. The engine turned over and Lambert frowned. He noticed the kami, I'm sure. You'd have to be blind or unwired to miss a program like that unfolding itself in your vehicle.

He may or may not have tried to stop it. I didn't know. Didn't care to know. He couldn't have blocked me with anything legal. He might have neutralized the kami, sure, but I had ways around that. Alexander's words were the biggest guns that you could draw in dataspace, and I just happened to have them on my hip.

The kid didn't say anything. He tugged on the door and his sour face turned flat out bitter when it locked.

Do you get it, kid?” I yanked the back door open and leaned against it. “You're not gonna win if it gets ugly.”

Lambert clamped down on his jaw. Probably trying to keep a nasty array of words in. I could have read through the morning news by the time he finally said, “Yeah. I get it.”

Good.” I nodded, just once, and let the locks pop open.

Thornhill had been standing there the entire time with his arms crossed and his face blank. He would have made a good diplomat. Maybe a poker player. “If you two are done...”

We are,” I said. “How's about we go see our monk now?”

 

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missyfleming_22 wrote 1403 days ago

Quite an exciting thriller you've got going here! I wasn't sure I would like it to be honest but you have a great writing style that made your story come to life. While I don't read many books that take place in space, you got me invested in the plot and the characters. Nicely done! You have a wonderful imagination!

Missy

CarolinaAl wrote 1404 days ago

You provide us an outstanding science fiction thriller with an intelligent, thought provoking plot and fascinating characters. Awesome world builfing. Rich imagery. Punchy narrative. Superb dramatic tension. Polished writing. A remarkable read. Backed.

Christian Piatt wrote 1406 days ago

You present an interesting concept in a time when government's role in the private sector is a hot topic.
Best of luck with your book. BACKED.
Peace,
Christian Piatt
PULLING THE GOALIE

Su Dan wrote 1406 days ago

very good writing- original style; thriller type atmosphere= on my watchlist...
read SEASONS...

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 1406 days ago

There is something immediate about your writing and the reader is soon absorbed in the tale. Well done. Paula Barrett (Cuthbert-how mean is my valley)

NMGriffis wrote 1063 days ago

Okay. I've got to say that I don't normally go for 1st person novels, but you caught me good! I love the noir feeling and how you integrated the Japanese culture into a western styled novel. That's how it appeared to me, anyhow. You've also integrated all the scifi references very well so that the matter-of-fact delivery presents, and the delivers, like we already know what you're talking about. I had no problem with figuring out what the kamis are or dataspace or anything else and that's an accomplishment. Worldbuilding on the fly is nothing to sneeze at.

There are some minor mis-words here and there that someone should catch on the next pass, but nothing that took me out of the story.

The pacing is pretty slow, but then, I'm enjoying that too. This isn't a movie or tv, it's something a reader can delve into, which is really great.

I'm really looking forward to more! Hope it's coming soon!

Riggs Bombay wrote 1364 days ago

The premise is compelling and I love the blend of Jap motifs with sci-fi. The noir voice does its job, and when it hits the net it scores big. There are moments that bounce off the rim, and unfortunately these tend ring more flat than they should on account of just how hot the good moments are. Reign in your prose a bit. Don't try to be clever quite so often--save it to savor it. I predict this baby's gonna be smokin' after a rewrite.

Josh Wagner
Deadwind Sea

Becca wrote 1391 days ago

Sci-Fi is not my cup of tea, but your characters were well drawn and your writing was clean and polished. The dialogue is taught and fast paced, and even your punctuation is in order. You bring in the essence of the story early on,a sure way to hook your target audience early on.
-Backed-

xBeccaX
The Forever Girl

Tamara G wrote 1394 days ago

A really good story that's fresh. The characters are well thought out and inventive. Backed.

Tam G

Owen Quinn wrote 1399 days ago

A cracking scifi concept that is right up my street and a fresh take on perfect tech gone bad, very believable world with solid characterisation, just shows man's arrogance will always fall to hos darker side. Nicely done

Chean wrote 1399 days ago

Fascinating read.....you have a natural talent and a style that resonates with the soul. Keep it up!

Chean wrote 1399 days ago

Fascinating read.....you have a natural talent and a style that resonates with the soul. Keep it up!

Pia wrote 1399 days ago

Joshua -

Binary Boys - Great Title. I like the film noire atmosphere. And the Shogonate's top agent, Ellison, a cool, Bogart type, makes an excellent MC in a binary world. Plus, the foolproof Amida Buddha who controlls the implanted criminals is obviously missing something. I'd enjoy reading this.

Backed, Pia (Course of Mirrors)

BadgerSensei wrote 1400 days ago

Hi, Joshua,
Binary Boys provides an interesting combination of old mixed with new. We have the old-fashioned voice of the private eye, which adds wonderful humor. There are the old habits, the old vices, and a blend of various oldies into something new. I was trying to figure out what a kami is. I think that could stand some clarification. This looks like a fun read.
Backed.
Gloria
Finnegan's Quest



Thank you!

In the context of the book, kami are computer programs that run around dataspace doing things for people. It's just sort of a catch-all term. They do searches, like google, or help run cybernetic implants, or any number of things. Hopefully, over the course of the book, it'll become clear, but I'll keep it in mind. :)

In the context of reality, they're the Shinto equivalent of gods and spirits and ghosts. Shinto's had a weird sort of relationship with Buddhism since pretty much the first moment Buddhist missionaries came to Japan, and I hope to play with that later on in the book.

gloria piper wrote 1400 days ago

Hi, Joshua,
Binary Boys provides an interesting combination of old mixed with new. We have the old-fashioned voice of the private eye, which adds wonderful humor. There are the old habits, the old vices, and a blend of various oldies into something new. I was trying to figure out what a kami is. I think that could stand some clarification. This looks like a fun read.
Backed.
Gloria
Finnegan's Quest

Justis Call wrote 1400 days ago

Hmmm.....interesting work here.......it skillfully takes the "real" of today's world and slides it into a future galaxy resplendent with rough landings, planetary police, and meeting in a bar. It will be fascinating to get more into the nitty-gritty of it all!

Backed,
Justis Call
Prestidigitations

Linda Lou wrote 1400 days ago

BINARY BOYS-Joshua M. Young
hullo Joshua. I am not all that familiar with the sci fi genre but it seems like we, humanity, will never get away from those with the inclination to kill. Already shelved and backed.
Please take a look at my book if you have not and thanks for that.
Linda Lou Long
Southern dis-Comfort
http://www.authonomy.com/ViewBook.aspx?bookid=11421

Justis Call wrote 1401 days ago

LOVE this pitch - it is more than intriguing, the idea of controlling human behavior mixed with the appearance of potential 'conspiracy' (". . .far more disturbing events. . ." holds my interest. On my WL!

Justis Call
Prestidigitations

lizjrnm wrote 1401 days ago

Talented writing with an intriguing storyline makes this easy to back!

Liz
The Cheech Room
A Fine Pickle

Tom Balderston wrote 1401 days ago

Akin to implanting pre-cogs in the mind-of-man. A Buddist Minority Report. Has potential. Will read more.
Tom Balderston
The Wonder of Terra

Alex Ryan wrote 1402 days ago

From what I've read this has the bones of something really good. The structure, narrative and premise all get ticks from me, for what that's worth. I hope it continues to do well for you. Good luck with it. Cheers

Barry Wenlock wrote 1403 days ago

Hi Josh,
Excellent work. I loved 'the stout that wasn't', '...a tie that hung around because...' 'and i appreciated that more than the (very fancy) smoke' etc etc.
Hugely entertaining, great use of language, consistent and gritty voice with more than a taste of dry wit.
Backed with pleasure.
Best wishes,
Barry
LITTLE KRISNA AND THE BIHAR BOYS

Elizabeth Wolfe wrote 1403 days ago

Dear Joshua,
This is destined to be a classic a la 1984 by George Orwell or The Giver by Lois Lowry. What an interesting topic, mind control. Well done!

BACKED
Elizabeth Wolfe (MEMORIES OF GLORY)

Geordy Grayson Reid wrote 1403 days ago

Love the Buddha. Well done. Please check out TRANSIT THERAPY. Thanks.

missyfleming_22 wrote 1403 days ago

Quite an exciting thriller you've got going here! I wasn't sure I would like it to be honest but you have a great writing style that made your story come to life. While I don't read many books that take place in space, you got me invested in the plot and the characters. Nicely done! You have a wonderful imagination!

Missy

zan wrote 1404 days ago

Binary Boys

Joshua M. Young

The main appeal to me when I read your pitches was the idea of a cosmic Buddha. Your alternative world is an exciting, intriguing one. That criminal-turned-monk murdering one of his fellows is predictable - you have a nice juicy plot. I love a good conspiracy story and this one has all the right ingredients to thrill and feed the imagination, as well as the emotions and intellect. The writing is also well handled and eases the reader effortlessly into the thick of things. "The system is foolproof." I hate when people say this. That's what they said about the Titanic; no doubt, that's what HC originally thought when they developed Authonomy. You have an impressive piece of writing here. Move over Dan Brown - and I'm not joking!

CarolinaAl wrote 1404 days ago

You provide us an outstanding science fiction thriller with an intelligent, thought provoking plot and fascinating characters. Awesome world builfing. Rich imagery. Punchy narrative. Superb dramatic tension. Polished writing. A remarkable read. Backed.

Gary Wedlund wrote 1405 days ago

Excellent work. I like the attitude of this piece. Keep up the excellent work. I wanna know lots more about the geisha. I backed this good stuff right away.

Gary Wedlund

BadgerSensei wrote 1405 days ago

Sci Fi is not my ‘take’ but I liked the human interest twist here, ie. The idea of controlling the minds of the evil. It’s a cracking premise, and fairly original. I’ve read quite a few books in this genre on the site, and I don’t think I’ve come across anything similar....So kudos for that.
Be frugal with the use of ‘that’
Right now, all (that )meant (that) I was wide awake.......Right now, that meant I was wide awake.
Except (that ) neither had briefcases.......except neither had briefcases.
In the same sort of way (that) a six year old is cute.....In the same sort of way a six year old is cute.
I spotted others but you may not agree. We all have a different writing voice.
Shelved with best wishes.
Wilma1
Knowing Liam Riley – I hope you enjoy reading it



Thank you for point "that" out to me, I'll keep it in mind :)

Wilma1 wrote 1406 days ago

Sci Fi is not my ‘take’ but I liked the human interest twist here, ie. The idea of controlling the minds of the evil. It’s a cracking premise, and fairly original. I’ve read quite a few books in this genre on the site, and I don’t think I’ve come across anything similar....So kudos for that.
Be frugal with the use of ‘that’
Right now, all (that )meant (that) I was wide awake.......Right now, that meant I was wide awake.
Except (that ) neither had briefcases.......except neither had briefcases.
In the same sort of way (that) a six year old is cute.....In the same sort of way a six year old is cute.
I spotted others but you may not agree. We all have a different writing voice.
Shelved with best wishes.
Wilma1
Knowing Liam Riley – I hope you enjoy reading it

Stark Silvercoin wrote 1406 days ago

I loved Binary Boys. The imagery and the matter of fact way that author Joshua M. Young talks about the space-based empire is great. I like how he calls a space elevator a beanstalk right at the beginning. I was pulled right into the excellent writing and snappy dialog. I kept thinking about Blade Runner while I was reading. It’s really that good. Only seven chapters are posted as of this review and backing, but I sincerely hope that Young will put more up soon.

name falied moderation wrote 1406 days ago

Dear Joshua
This is so weird....I wrote you a comment and cannot find it but I saw it there....anyways
I have not read it all but will carry on. I loved your short pitch it grabbed me and your long pitch truly enticed me to read on. Original storyline so far and very well crafted. I am not an expert in grammar nor punctuation etc, but I love the flow and I am really getting a true appreciation of Science fiction. this is especially with regard to writers such as yourself. I am aspiring to write, you have honed a natural talent CONGRATS

Please take a moment to look, COMMENT which is

important to me, and BACK my book. if not that is OK

also

The VERY best of luck to you

BACKED BY ME FOR SURE
Denise
The Letter

Christian Piatt wrote 1406 days ago

You present an interesting concept in a time when government's role in the private sector is a hot topic.
Best of luck with your book. BACKED.
Peace,
Christian Piatt
PULLING THE GOALIE

Rusty Bernard wrote 1406 days ago

Hi Joshua,

I have backed your book because I was hooked by the pitch, loved the introduction and read on. How much more I read depends on time and commitment.

Enjoy everything and good luck.

Rusty Bernard
The Mental Pause

Bocri wrote 1406 days ago

The pitch for Binary Boys not only hooked, but lined and sinkered me. The blend of sci-fi, fantasy, detective in a thriller, while not a thoroughbred, is certainly an intriguing mix. The cynical, world weary 'voice' of the narrator is pitched just right and the 'technical' detail sounds feasible. The plot is original and develops without deviation or padding. Nice! BACKED. Robert Davidson. The Tuzla Run

Andrew Burans wrote 1406 days ago

You have written a very interesting and unique storyline, which I do like, and created a most memorable main character in Ellison. I also really like your use of the first person narrative voice. The dialogue is realistic and well written and the pace of your story flows well. All of this along with your descriptive writing makes your science fiction thriller a pleasure to read. Backed.

Andrew Burans
The Reluctant Warrior: The Beginning

Su Dan wrote 1406 days ago

very good writing- original style; thriller type atmosphere= on my watchlist...
read SEASONS...

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 1406 days ago

There is something immediate about your writing and the reader is soon absorbed in the tale. Well done. Paula Barrett (Cuthbert-how mean is my valley)

scorselo wrote 1407 days ago

An interesting twist from the usual Sci-Fi, nice title, criminal mind controled by benvolent buddha. the writing pulls us into and through this tale. Nice use of innovative futuristic slang.

Backed

Scorselo

Despinas1 wrote 1407 days ago

Great work Joshua,
Backed with pleasure
Helen
The Last Dream

fh wrote 1407 days ago

BINARY BOYS
Oh I enjoyed this! This is somewhat different from the majority of Sci fi.You have a mix of intelligent culture and technology.
I particularly enjoyed reading about your main characters. They interact together well with some very believable dialogue. This is a well crafted and put together book and a nicely executed piece of writing.
I am happy to back this as I think it will do well in the right market and targeted at the right audience.
When you have a moment I would be really pleased if you could take a look at my own book; The Assassins Village. Very good luck on here.
Faith
THE ASSASSINS’ VILLAGE

celticwriter wrote 1407 days ago

Hi Joshua, nice, consistent flow. Interesting stuff. Backed.

sincerely,
jim
jack & charmian london

Jack Hughes wrote 1407 days ago

This is an outstandingly inventive story, blending culture and mysticism with technology. Like The Matrix, this is hugely original, superbly written and with dynamic individual characters. Science fiction at its finest.

Backed with pleasure, best of luck Joshua.

Jack Hughes
Dawn of Shadows

Fred Le Grand wrote 1407 days ago

Superb!
Fluent writing (a few wee typo's at the start) but captivating narrative prose and descriptive prose which is vivid and brief enough to keep interest.
The pace is excellent and the MC's voice shines clear from the start.
Very good writing - can't judge the plot because only read the first chapter, but I can tell you this is one of the better books on this site (and I've been here for 18 months!).
Backed with pleasure.

SusieGulick wrote 1407 days ago

Dear Joshua, I love your intriguing suspensebul story. :) The geisha & Ellison & 2 yipping dogs in chapter 7 made me laugh. :) What an amazing creative mind you have for this story. :) I love Termnator movie & tv series & it reminds me of the chip in the head. :) Yours is like a continuation of that. :) Greatest write, ever! :) Your pitch was excellent because it prepared me for my read & your crisp paragraphs & dialogue sped my reading right along. :) I've backed your book :) - could you please take a moment to back my memoir book? :) Thanks so very much. :) Love, Susie :)

This is information from authonomy (so beware of any other untrue information you may receive that is spam & not quotes of authonomy):
"When you back a book, it only improves the ranking of that book, not yours. However, the author whose book you are backing may decide to back your book also, in which case yes, your ranking would be improved"
"Every time you place a book on your bookshelf, your recommendation pushes the book up the rankings. And while that book sits on your bookshelf, your reputation as a talent spotter increases depending on how well that book performs."

KW wrote 1407 days ago

This is a fascinating idea for a SF thriller. I love the idea of putting implants into the minds of dangerous criminals so that they can be controlled by Dainichi Nyorai. Of course, this is eventually manipulated and all hell breaks lose. The mixing of cultures in your future world is intriguing: a Nordic-skinned geisha named Hestia who is getting drunk in a hotel bar near a starport called Alexandria. Simply, I love it. It has a hybrid feel like a fantasy manga mixed with a detective novel. Your balance of dialogue and description is about right. The idea of protective kami is very interesting as well and the line: "Dataspace would be buzzing like Shibuya on a Friday night . . ." Shogun Alexander, indeed! "Shavelings don't kill people . . . They do before they become monks . . . the nembutsu implant and Amida-Buddha liberates you from all that squishy physicality stuff." I guess something has gone wrong with the system.

I'm enjoying this and will come back to read more. Backed for now.

SusieGulick wrote 1407 days ago

:) comment to follow - read & comment on 1 hour later :)

R.A. Battles wrote 1407 days ago

Love the title and the pitches, but your voice sold me. Backed!

Rodney B.

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