Book Jacket

 

rank 521
word count 95348
date submitted 20.10.2010
date updated 14.05.2013
genres: Fiction, Popular Culture
classification: universal
complete

One Night in Tunisia

Clive Radford

Set against the Blair-Brown years, Poseidon’s crew has an unexpected encounter with an asylum seeker in Tunis, which profoundly affects all their futures.

 

On sojourn, Glyn Sumner and his comrades voyage around the Med on Poseidon, a fast schooner. They find solace away from the ever imposing regulations and sterility of Blighty, and experience transcendence and seminal life in North African ports.

Tunis brings bewildering confrontations for the crew with Saleh, an Ethiopian asylum seeker, suspected of involvement with Muslim terrorists, and Colonel Nassar, Chief of Police. It sharpens Glyn’s focus regarding what’s happening back in Blighty.

Off Sicily, Poseidon witnesses an asylum seeker sea rescue by the coast guard. Poseidon’s crew wonders if Saleh is on board, or whether he is shaking hands with Neptune. They also ponder if they are also crossing over to the dark side, with Priest’s dystopia vision just around the corner.

Chapters

1 Unexpected Encounter
2 The Die is Cast
3 Realisation
4 Ship's Company
5 A Martyr in the Making
6 Embarkation
7 Sages and Seers
8 Searching for Passage
9 Escapism
10 Spying on Poseidon's Crew
11 Into the Tunis Night
12 The Police Station
13 Majid's Cruiser
14 Back on Poseidon
15 Final Brush with Neptune
16 Appendix 1 Poseidon

 
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tags

confessional, controversy, escapism, metaphysical

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134 comments

 

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Geowonderland wrote 251 days ago

Clive,
I don't know what your background is or if you did an extensive research, but there is a lot of knowledge showing through your work. It's well written and interesting from the very beginning. That long name of Saleh was pretty impressive.
Good luck,
Aneta

O Cahan wrote 360 days ago

very well researched and delivered., a compelling read!

Seringapatam wrote 367 days ago

Clive, there are a number of reasons I wanted to read this. One of them being my mum goes every year to this gorgeous place but there are other reasons which we wont good book with a nice flow to it. I like the descriptions you feed us with so much that I felt I was actually there at one point. So well done with this book and I think if you get on here and sell it to the reader this could go far.
Sean Connolly. British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R) Please consider me for a read or watch list wont you?? Many thanks. Sean .

Andrea Taylor wrote 456 days ago

This is beautifully written and described. Two points; you must decide if its a non-fiction book, or keep some objective distance. Making political comments is fine if it comes from the MC and is part of the story, but it is always wise to be understated and let the reader make their own judgments from the story. Some things are obvious and dont need to be pointed out.
Secondly, although I love the opening descriptions, which are excellent, a 'hook' is always necessary to get a reader into a story. Descriptions, no matter how well executed, dont really work. Change those two things and you are on to a winner!
Andrea
The de Amerley Affair

Cathy Hardy wrote 457 days ago

Very clever story, which I have enjoyed. Very exciting sea adventure with a contemporary feel and some strong politics :) Very vivid descriptions and strong characters. 6 stars

savannah wrote 458 days ago

Absolutely beautiful writing. Setting is so vivid I can smell the salt air, hear the traders in the market and see all the vivid colours vying for attention. You paint the picture that makes the reader want to continue to know more about the place and very intresting characters but while we are trying to get to know them - things start getting heavily political.There is a lot of information that we are trying to digest and at the same time - stay in the story.

Again very evocative writing and you have a great way of bringing the characters to life.

lil flower girl wrote 460 days ago

first book... not sure if i'm doing this right...

evermoore wrote 483 days ago

Clive...Your talent with the written word is simply amazing. This is a timely body of work...the weight of the facts in it blending perfectly with the fantasy. I was drawn in by the visuals your words painted, seeing everyone involved in the tale...as well as place. You seem to write so effortlessly, and yet I know you had to research to have so many things so factually based.

High stars and a Happy New Year to you and yours....Linda

Lenny Banks wrote 492 days ago

Hi Clive, I took a look at chapter 4, thanks for reviewing my work. This is a very interesting piece of work, it is clear a lot of work has gone into researching it or it is based on real experiences. It reads like a story, but is laced with real life experiences like the sailing of a boat and on to historical factual information about the sights around the places they visit. You have an addictive book here, I not only want to read more I want to go there and experience these experiences for myself. Good Work and Good Luck.

Kindest Regards and Best Wishes
Lenny Banks -
Tide and Time: At The Rock
Take Care: On The Rock

Stark Silvercoin wrote 584 days ago

One Night in Tunisia is an adventure story with a modern, political twist. The book starts out quite interestingly with the crew of the Poseidon, a schooner loaded with British men sailing around Africa, encountering an asylum seeker who approaches them at a hotel where they are relaxing after a hard day.

The encounter ends with the mysterious Saleh running away from police, but that affects the rest of the story in tone if nothing else.

At its core, author Clive Radford has penned quite an adventure. Who wouldn’t love to sail around the world, to find oneself in distant lands? One wonders if the author took a similar adventure and is relating those experiences to the reader. It makes me want to set sail. Descriptions of the various ports of call are all well-described and quite alluring. But the book also makes a political statement. The views of the author are not too veiled. Some people with a similar viewpoint will love this, though it does risk turning some readers off. Still, as a way to express a political view, there are worse ways than showing it off behind a great tale of adventure.

John Breeden II
Old Number Seven

Isoje David wrote 591 days ago

You capture with the paragraph of chapter one. you writing sounds well. i think this book will be better as non-fiction story. thanks/

three stars

Adam Thurstman wrote 611 days ago

This is a great read, Clive has a skilled and economical use of words, and this reads like a classic thriller from the outset. It is very enjoyable especially the airy Mediterranean feel it has mixed with mystery.

Adam De-Thurstman
Is Israel Real?

FrancesK wrote 666 days ago

chapter 1: You capture the scene visually - it's inviting us into its chaos and noise. Try not to give us too much info about each character before they act or speak - let the action tell the story, their reactions will tell us more about the kind of people they are than your phrases, which hold up the intriguing action.
Ed 'deceases'? ceases?
By the end of the first chapter, I had lost the lively sense of being in Tunis. Your long political discussion weakens what could be an exciting beginning to your story. Too many chunks of info are being thrown at us, which could be woven into your narrative more subtly, and if timed right, could pack more of a punch. As it is, we now feel we know too much
Chapter 2: I'm beginning to wonder if this book would be better as non fiction. It clearly seems based on facts, or your experience, and your ideas are being put so strongly and forcefully the bare bones of the story are hardly in evidence until the last para of this chapter. The information is difficult to take in, it is so condensed. Yet this topic is highly relevant and newsworthy. You need to decide if you are writing a political essay or a work of crafted fiction. Either way, I wish you the very best of luck with this important subject matter..

Maevesleibhin wrote 725 days ago

Clive,
I only read the first chapter.
I must really recommend that you do not start like this. It is largely a vehement discussion. Although it expresses a particular political view (and squashes the other) it comes across as very preachy in the first chapter. It will drive many readers away. You can do this later, when the reader is hooked. But if you do it now, you are setting yourself up for failure. Instead, I recommend that you focus on ambiance and hook. You have good characters, intreaguing, well described ambiance, and a compelling hook. Plus you write well. The police looking for the man, whose involvement with an extremist group is suspected, is fine. It is the dialogue that really makes it hard to swallow. Again, if you bring this in 20 or 50 pages later, then the reader will be more lenient. But I suggest you hook good and hard first.
That, at least, is my opinion.
Best of luck with it,
Maeve

Software wrote 732 days ago

Hi Clive,. Thanks for uploading this. It’s an interesting idea, with well developed characters, and the writing shines out. After so much is thrown into chapter one and the contentious character Saleh, chapter two could only be an anti-climax. However, it certainly isn’t.

Good luck with this - Ian



Hello Ian,

Many thanks for your review.

Regards,

Clive

whoster wrote 733 days ago

Clive,

There's a lot to be said for the first chapter, and you paint what appears to be an authentic picture of Tunisia. Some nice descriptive touches, especially in the opening few paragraphs. One thing that made the read a little tough were the excessive use of commas, which for me broke the flow and rhythm. A couple of examples are "My seven comrades(,)glance at the cloudless night sky" and "we follow his eyes(,) as he glances back at the terrace steps."

From my perspective, I found the staccato feel of the read a little disconcerting, which in turn made it hard for me follow the story. I think if you ironed out some of these commas (and a few semi-colons), you'd help the read to flow a lot more.

I'm sorry if this sounds a little critical - I'm hardly an expert, but from my point of view, I'd like to see the writing flow a little more.

Best wishes,
Pete

iandsmith wrote 733 days ago

Hi Clive,. Thanks for uploading this. It’s an interesting idea, with well developed characters, and the writing shines out. After so much is thrown into chapter one and the contentious character Saleh, chapter two could only be an anti-climax. However, it certainly isn’t.

Good luck with this - Ian

katemb wrote 762 days ago

This is an interesting premise and subject matter. I liked the opening set up of the group being approached by Saleh and trying to work out his angle. You set up an atmospheric description of Tunis.

Some thoughts.
The pitch is a bit repetitive for me, saying 'set against the Blair/Brown years' twice, seems unnecessary. I want to be drawn in more by the drama.
The opening description has great tone and word choices but for me the grammar was a little testing. There are lots of commas and I didn't think they were all necessary.
Also, your narrator is inclined to tell us about, rather than show us, his friends: 'Steve, open as ever, never prone to pre-judgement...' is an example.
For me, this might be more effective if there were less of the Poseidon team being introduced at once. Perhaps Saleh could meet with just one or two so the reader doesn't have so many names and personalities to try and grasp all at once. Just a thought.

Best,
Kate
The Licenser

Nathan O'Hagan wrote 767 days ago

two chapters read. This is not the typpe of thing i would normally read. Initially, this had the fee of a big, globe-trotting thriller, in the Fleming/Ludlum idium. The setting and contect is an interesting one that will draw in fans of the genre. The cvharacters are well drawn, and it quickly had the feel of one of those franchise type novels, the beginning of a series rather than just a stand alone novel. However, i felt the first paragraph was a bit over-long, and perhaps could have got into the meat of the stoy a little quicker. Also, i felt you over punctuate at times, adding commas in the middle of sentences where they felt superfluous to me.
The mention of the Blair/brown years is intriguing and it would be interesting to see how you worrk these themes into the story. Highly starred.

jlsimpson wrote 778 days ago

You have chosen a delicate topic as the baseline for your story. Good for you.
You talk about Africa as though you know it personally, and the ship's crew as though they are old friends. You are obviously well versed in the political situations discussed in the book, and the ease with which you put the information into dialogue form proves that this is subject matter you know inside and out.
There are two voices here.
The first voice is narrative. You are telling the reader what is happening the whole time as though you are relating a memory that happened a while ago. This can work in flashbacks, but I've never read an entire novel written in the past tense unless it was in flashback form.
The second voice is of the characters in dialogue which feels much more natural.
I never say this, but I think it will make a huge difference in the first chapter...go back and take out most of your commas and semi colons. It will keep actions from being separated from the subjects.
For instance you wouldn't say
"The African, jumped into the water, splashing the small children, with his cannonball"
because the comma between African and jumped puts an unnatural break between the subject and the adjective. Let him complete his action. Nor would you put a comma between the words children and with.
"The African jumped into the water, splashing the small children with his cannonball"
This comes from me, the worlds run-on sentence queen and lover of commas. Shorter descriptive sentences are more effective when reading than seeing six commas in the wrong place.

Otherwise, very interesting. Initially in the story you are taking on a topic that is bound to offend the kind of people who don't want to think about the reality of our world's current situation, or acknowledge potentially combative differences in cultures and religions, but you back yourself up with history rather than emotion.
I'd like to hear more about the Poseidon and her crew and why she's in Africa early on in the story. I love the way you describe the city and it's lazy warm feelings and exotic scents.
You have a good way with words and I look forward to reading more.

Software wrote 791 days ago

I read up through chapter two and so far I think you have a great story. Your dialogue is natural, and you have some fantastic imagery woven in just the right places. You have a smooth flowing style that makes it an easy read. This is a well written book and I’m surprised it’s not sitting on more shelves. Thanks for the read. I will give this one high stars for sure.



Hello CGHarris,

Many thanks for your kind words and positive assessment. It is alwasy gratifying to hear that someone has found pleasure in my work.

All the best,

Clive

CGHarris wrote 791 days ago

I read up through chapter two and so far I think you have a great story. Your dialogue is natural, and you have some fantastic imagery woven in just the right places. You have a smooth flowing style that makes it an easy read. This is a well written book and I’m surprised it’s not sitting on more shelves. Thanks for the read. I will give this one high stars for sure.

ClaireLyman wrote 801 days ago

Anything that starts "set against the Blair/Brown years" is going ot draw me right in, though I wouldn't naturally be drawn to a North African themed novel usually.
You do a good job of setting the scene in those first few paragraphs, but I wonder if action should come sooner. A lot of readers skim this stuff to get to the story so I think it's better to keep description to a minimum at the start. In fact, you could start with the appearance of the man -draw us right into their world rather than introducing us to it gradually, pick up details of names etc on the fly.
You have a few punctuation issues and some stray apostrophes but nothing that can't be easily fixed.
Would be interested to see the link between Blair/Brown and the story... That could be a really interesting point to explore.

AuroraNemesis wrote 805 days ago

A great read, with a strong and interesting story.
I think the story is the most important part of the book.
This shows you are a natural storyteller.
Your language is good and the story flows.
Enjoyed what I read and will recommend to others.
Well done

AndrewStevens wrote 813 days ago

Read and rated.

Software wrote 823 days ago

fascinating piece, original and interesting setting, and cultures...you write it well with a brilliant combination of narrative and dialogue...
on my watchlist...
read SEASONS...



Dear Su,

Many thanks for backing and commenting on One Night in Tunisia. Glad the read gave you some pleasure.

All the best,

Clive

Su Dan wrote 823 days ago

fascinating piece, original and interesting setting, and cultures...you write it well with a brilliant combination of narrative and dialogue...
on my watchlist...
read SEASONS...

twinbabyboys wrote 947 days ago

"The days commerce" should be the day's commerce, shouldn't it?

Dr Ajay Kansal wrote 964 days ago

Hi
Your story is well researched; its a great premise as well. Its characters and storyline is portrayed well. I like your sentence:
"Religion is fine if it's set in context and used to add richness to life without consuming everything around it." You may change everything to anything.

David Garland wrote 973 days ago

I've read the first chapter which is a mix of clever and mediocre. Too many pseudo phrases, such as, "Vino veritas, orange juice veritas"-- what is that supposed to mean?. Little or no capitalisation at the commencement of dialogue. "Brownie black eyes" is strange terminology. Repetitive phrases, such as "Lips trying to find moisture" This is what I mean by a mix of clever and mediocre.

The story is interesting but laboured. It needs some serious editing if the first chapter is representative of the whole. David

Software wrote 988 days ago

My favorite aspect of this was the setting. It's one of the most unique I've read, even outside of authonomy, and I was fascinated by the various cultural references. It added a nice element of intrigue.

Your writing style is outstanding. It flows smoothly with active sentences that drag your reader along. You have almost a conversationalist style that works well here. You're definitely talented.

I love how the tension gradually increased the longer Saleh stands before them. Sentence by sentence, the rising conflict took hold of my interest. And when it culminated in the end, I was officially hooked.

Along with the setting, I find the premise intriguing. In my opinion, this is a very creative story.

Suggestions: There were a few instances of telling in your opening that I felt would have been stronger had you shown this information instead. Watch out for "was" and "were" as these tend to be the most obvious signs of telling. You have a tendency to overwrite at times. For example, I'd cut "seeking moisture" from "he licked his lips..." It's unnecessary. The characters are a bit difficult to keep straight early on. I'd consider providing a bit more characterization or cutting those who aren't entirely necessary.

Typos: Should be: "day's commerce." Make sure you capitalize the first letter in dialogue. The use of the semi-colon in "He was in his early..." is incorrect. An independent clause should follow a semi-colon. Should be: "granite-like" since it's two words serving as one adjective. Same with "broad-mindedness." Also "non-Muslims." Should be: Jeff leaned forward. "We are not interested..." since his action has nothing to do with his speech. Should be "leaning over Saleh." There were a few other minor mistakes, but noting that kept me from enjoying the story. A careful edit will resolve most of your issues.

This is an excellent start. The writing is solid and the premise is one of the most unique I've come across on authonomy. Well done!



Dear Joshua,

Many thanks for your positive assessment of One Night in Tunisia. It is very gratifying when a reader truly finds something that excites and hooks. I really appreciate your enthusiasm.

Kind regards,

Clive

Joshua Jacobs wrote 989 days ago

My favorite aspect of this was the setting. It's one of the most unique I've read, even outside of authonomy, and I was fascinated by the various cultural references. It added a nice element of intrigue.

Your writing style is outstanding. It flows smoothly with active sentences that drag your reader along. You have almost a conversationalist style that works well here. You're definitely talented.

I love how the tension gradually increased the longer Saleh stands before them. Sentence by sentence, the rising conflict took hold of my interest. And when it culminated in the end, I was officially hooked.

Along with the setting, I find the premise intriguing. In my opinion, this is a very creative story.

Suggestions: There were a few instances of telling in your opening that I felt would have been stronger had you shown this information instead. Watch out for "was" and "were" as these tend to be the most obvious signs of telling. You have a tendency to overwrite at times. For example, I'd cut "seeking moisture" from "he licked his lips..." It's unnecessary. The characters are a bit difficult to keep straight early on. I'd consider providing a bit more characterization or cutting those who aren't entirely necessary.

Typos: Should be: "day's commerce." Make sure you capitalize the first letter in dialogue. The use of the semi-colon in "He was in his early..." is incorrect. An independent clause should follow a semi-colon. Should be: "granite-like" since it's two words serving as one adjective. Same with "broad-mindedness." Also "non-Muslims." Should be: Jeff leaned forward. "We are not interested..." since his action has nothing to do with his speech. Should be "leaning over Saleh." There were a few other minor mistakes, but noting that kept me from enjoying the story. A careful edit will resolve most of your issues.

This is an excellent start. The writing is solid and the premise is one of the most unique I've come across on authonomy. Well done!

mrsdfwt wrote 996 days ago

Clive,
Good writing and great characters. I find it hard to comment on this sort of story, but i've got to give you credit for the obvious research you did to accomplish One Night in Tunisia. I do like the idea of Key West and agree that the lifestyle there is relaxed and happy, and at least for part of the year, the idyllic place to live. :).
My favourite phrase:
"Religion is fine if it's set in context and used to add richness to life without consuming everything around it." Love it!
High rated and placed in line for the desk.
Maria
Dark of the Moon

Dwayne Kavanagh wrote 1005 days ago

Hey Clive, as requested, I read the first chapter (that's all I have time for right now, but I will come back to it).

I liked that you immediately drop us down in the midsts of action and keep us there all through the first chapter. I liked that you ended the chapter with good tension and a suspense hook. The names standout and are refreshing and I really like Saleh as a character. You know what you're doing when it comes to narrating a story...I really enjoyed what I've read so far.

Cheers,
Dwayne

mvw888 wrote 1112 days ago

From the pitch, this strikes me as a commercial premise. I agree with other reviewers that you do a great job with setting the scene, which I think is an important element to having a story with international intrique. I also think that your pacing is good in terms of narrative and dialogue and your dialogue is well done. I had a hard time overlooking the many punctuation errors and at times, grammatical problems. I know some don't like to discuss that "stuff," but to me...a book cannot be taken seriously unless these elements are in order. My advice to you would be to pull back and undertake a serious edit. Employ a line editor if need be and get it in tip top shape, because you do have the makings of a good story and many talents on display here.

---Mary

Software wrote 1113 days ago

This tackles some very controversial topics head-on; this requires courage. Saleh's grievances and the westerner's rebuttals did not sit 100% easily with me, but this was a fine way to draw the reader into your tale. It's a little too talky to begin with, but we are quickly into the action at the end, as dumbfounded as your western characters. Where this will go, and the philosophical journey your characters will make as they confront Saleh's life - for good or illl - fascinates me.

P



Hello Pat,

Glad you found the first chapter fascinating. Please read on to find out what happens next to both Poseidon's crew and Saleh.

Best regards,

Clive

Pat Black wrote 1113 days ago

This tackles some very controversial topics head-on; this requires courage. Saleh's grievances and the westerner's rebuttals did not sit 100% easily with me, but this was a fine way to draw the reader into your tale. It's a little too talky to begin with, but we are quickly into the action at the end, as dumbfounded as your western characters. Where this will go, and the philosophical journey your characters will make as they confront Saleh's life - for good or illl - fascinates me.

P

George Sinclair wrote 1134 days ago

Hi Clive

Here are my comments.

General comments : -
1. An interesting story.
2. I like you’re your ability as a wordsmith, and your use of similes.
3. There is too much use of the verb “to be”. “I was, we were, etc.” should be minimised, as they introduce passive text. (Do a search and you’ll see what I mean.)
4. You need to physically describe the main characters initially, then feed in more description of them as the story progresses.
5. There are some commas missing.
6. When there is text prior to dialogue, the start of the dialogue should be capitalised.
7. It sounds like the real story starts at chapter 3. I would seriously consider deleting chapters 1 and 2, and feeding some of their details in later. (See point 8 in Ch 1 below also.)

Some detailed critical comments : -
Ch 1
1. Instead of using “…was feeling relaxed…” try using “…felt relaxed…”
2. There is too much initial description of the Muslim in his twenties. Suggest feeding some of it in later.
3. The paragraph starting “When Carolyn and I…” and the next 4 paragraphs are a major distraction from the story. The first chapter should only be about the main story. Although a much shortened version of this (a couple of sentences) might be OK.
4. Further on, we are getting too much of a history lesson on the Crusades, and there is not enough dialogue. I suggest that you reduce the history and intersperse it with dialogue. That way you are then “showing” and not “telling”. Perhaps more of the history, if it is really needed, can be fed in later.
5. Your point about the Muslims being defeated in all 5 Crusades is not correct. The 3rd and 5th crusades in particular, as they were won by the Muslims.
6. Further on, you tell us too much about immigration problems – cut most of it, and feed in later if necessary.
7. Even further on you tell us about life in the Western world – cut most of it, and feed in later if necessary.
8. There is far too much “telling”. You really need to concentrate on the story, particularly in the first few chapters. I believe that if you cut out most of the telling and intersperse it with dialogue, the story will stand out. Just now the story is hidden in the depths of “telling” us lots of other things that are only indirectly connected to the story.
Ch 2
1. This is “telling” us another history lesson – don’t see any story.

Hope this helps.
Best regards
George

SusieGulick wrote 1135 days ago

I got so excited, Clive, when I saw that you had backed my "Bible Verse Songs." :) Thanks so very much. :) Love, Susie :)

A. Zoomer wrote 1137 days ago

One Night in Tunisia
This is a great read. The characters have heart and soul, the story sings and the writing flows.
Check this book out.
A Zoomer

Software wrote 1145 days ago

Me again. Just one last comment. The book title. Now I have to admit that I have not read the entire book so perhaps I am incorrect. Surely the story occuirs in more than just one night.



I refer you to the previous comment in response.

Software wrote 1145 days ago

Firstly let me say that I do not do technical critigues. Number one, I do not feel qualified; and 2 I'm not too bothered about teh grammar being 100% correct. Having said taht I can't make my mind up about this story. Someone else has said that by trimming it it copuld make a good short story. That could be true. But I also think that by putting in more background, more description, more intrique, more tension, whatever, it could be a good full length novel. For example a bit more information about teh eight men would be useful. why are they in the area. How does Saleh know of them. Did he see them in a cafe perhaps. Has he been following them, maybe.
Conversely there are sections where there is too much detail, the story slows down. I think a balance needs to be struck. It has all of the ingredients of a good story. It just needs a bit of work, I think. These comments are just my opinion, and you should just ignore them if necessary.



Hello Tom/John,

There is only so much an opening chapter can contain without bursting out into the entire novel. Answers to the questions you have raised are in the following chapters. It's all there. Everything is revealed including where Saleh picked up the Poseidon crew. Ask Colonel Nassar, he know's.

All the best,

Clive

Tom Kendall wrote 1145 days ago

Me again. Just one last comment. The book title. Now I have to admit that I have not read the entire book so perhaps I am incorrect. Surely the story occuirs in more than just one night.

Tom Kendall wrote 1145 days ago

Firstly let me say that I do not do technical critigues. Number one, I do not feel qualified; and 2 I'm not too bothered about teh grammar being 100% correct. Having said taht I can't make my mind up about this story. Someone else has said that by trimming it it copuld make a good short story. That could be true. But I also think that by putting in more background, more description, more intrique, more tension, whatever, it could be a good full length novel. For example a bit more information about teh eight men would be useful. why are they in the area. How does Saleh know of them. Did he see them in a cafe perhaps. Has he been following them, maybe.
Conversely there are sections where there is too much detail, the story slows down. I think a balance needs to be struck. It has all of the ingredients of a good story. It just needs a bit of work, I think. These comments are just my opinion, and you should just ignore them if necessary.

Software wrote 1147 days ago

Hi, What a great story, and what a good time to be telling it! Refugees, North Africa!! You couldn't be more relevant! I wish all the best with it.
Star rated
Ruthx



Hello Ruth,

Many thanks for your kind remarks. Glad you enjoyed what you read. Yes you are quite right regarding its relevance to what is happening currently in North Africa. I bit the bullet and made some unsolicited approaches to literary agents with the below email. Got some bites!

Best regards,

Clive

Current North African crisis foretold in new novel - will sell like hot cakes!
From:
Clive Radford
Add to Contacts
To:

One Night in Tunisia 28th Feb 2011(Word 97-2003 doc) V.1.doc (525KB)

FAO: < >


Dear < >,

Re: One Night in Tunisia

Forgive this unsolicited approach but in view of events happening in North Africa right now, this novel will sell like hot cakes.

It foretells events which we are now seeing 'live' on our TV screens.

< > could steal a march on competitors and have a book out on the market which will be scooped up by people curious to understand the North African crisis in the context of a novel.

Over twenty novels were resultant from 9/11. All were successful. Most went on to be best sellers. The current North African affair is building up into a similar watershed event. Publishers must be wetting their appetites in anticipation.

I don't usually get this forward but I beg, beseech and implore you to take a look at this work. It's a golden opportunity, just too good to miss.

I look forward to your reply.

Yours sincerely,

Clive Radford

Synopsis

Eight Englishmen on sojourn, voyage around the Med on Poseidon, a fast schooner. Set against the impact of the Blair/Brown years, the crew find solace and experience seminal life in North African ports.

Tunis brings an unexpected encounter with Saleh, an Ethiopian asylum seeker and Colonel Nassar, Chief of Police. It sharpens the focus of what’s happening back in Blighty.

Off Sicily, Poseidon witnesses an asylum seeker sea rescue by the coast guard. Some have drowned. Poseidon’s crew wonder if Saleh is on board or whether he is shaking hands with Neptune. They also ponder if they are also crossing over to the dark side with Priest’s dystopia vision just around the corner.

cv

I first began writing poetry and short stories at school, then university but mainly through subsequent life experience. My poetry has been published in poetry magazines and more recently in six book compilations by United Press. My ambition is have a volume of poetry, short stories and novels published.

One Night in Tunisia will appeal to those fascinated by intrigue but I want to get its broader message out into a wider audience. This ambition will only be achieved through the support of an agent looking for a work which has unique selling points and sets itself apart. One Night in Tunisia satisfies both these key differentiators giving me a distinctive voice.





Ruth Hannah wrote 1147 days ago

Hi, What a great story, and what a good time to be telling it! Refugees, North Africa!! You couldn't be more relevant! I wish all the best with it.
Star rated
Ruthx

fh wrote 1147 days ago

ONE NIGHT IN TUNISIA
I remember commenting on this book when it was under a different title, I wonder if you've changed the content much as well?
Your pitch is intriguing and the start in chapter 1 gets off well with much to think about. The tension begins to build as Saleh explains more about what he is after. Your pacing is pretty good so far.
Chapter 1
A few grammar mistakes -, 'ok' Should be a capital before the mark and OK should be in caps.
age - should be aged
I would have liked to see more use of commas. Some of your sentences are quite long. Try reading them out loud - you need a breath sometimes!
'Well'. I think this should be a question 'Well?'
Numbers written 23 - should be twenty three years old. Spell numbers before one hundred. More examples of this later on in the MS

These grammar mistakes are all simple ones to overcome - I too make lots of mistakes, and it is a devil sometimes finding them when you've been over the text dozens of times. I think you need to spend some more time in doing this.
One thing bothered me; you reminiscences. I often felt that I wanted to get on with the story proper eg the family from New York who sold up and went to live in Key West - interesting but not valid at this point.
I also felt that your political parts were a bit like a lecture.

This has improved since I last commented on your work however. Again I love the exotic setting and the story theme and plot is well thought out. I have given you a good handful of stars and good luck with it.
Faith
THE CROSSING


fh wrote 1147 days ago

ONE NIGHT IN TUNISIA
I remember commenting on this book when it was under a different title, I wonder if you've changed the content much as well?
Your pitch is intriguing and the start in chapter 1 gets off well with much to think about. The tension begins to build as Saleh explains more about what he is after. Your pacing is pretty good so far.
Chapter 1
A few grammar mistakes -, 'ok' Should be a capital before the mark and OK should be in caps.
age - should be aged
I would have liked to see more use of commas. Some of your sentences are quite long. Try reading them out loud - you need a breath sometimes!
'Well'. I think this should be a question 'Well?'
Numbers written 23 - should be twenty three years old. Spell numbers before one hundred. More examples of this later on in the MS

These grammar mistakes are all simple ones to overcome - I too make lots of mistakes, and it is a devil sometimes finding them when you've been over the text dozens of times. I think you need to spend some more time in doing this.
One thing bothered me; you reminiscences. I often felt that I wanted to get on with the story proper eg the family from New York who sold up and went to live in Key West - interesting but not valid at this point.
I also felt that your political parts were a bit like a lecture.

This has improved since I last commented on your work however. Again I love the exotic setting and the story theme and plot is well thought out. I have given you a good handful of stars and good luck with it.
Faith
THE CROSSING


Software wrote 1152 days ago

I read your first chapter.

General comments: Thought-provoking start. Good descriptions. Good tension. Good pacing.

Specific comments on chapter one:
1) Steve who was nearest to him looked around us and answered, 'Yes'. Period goes inside the closing quote mark.
2) 'I want to ask you if ......... When using ellipses ( ... ), only use three dots. Using more than three dots pulls the reader out of your story while they try to determine what you mean with nine dots. You don't want that. There are more cases of using too many dots for ellipses.
3) 'You were saying', said Jeff. Punctuation goes inside the closing quote mark. There are more cases of dialogue punctuation being outside the quote marks.
4) He showed us a thick roll of Tunisian dinar, 'You have a boat, yes?' Period after 'dinar.' The sentence is ordinary narrative and should be punctuated like any narrative sentence. There are more cases of narrative sentences being punctuated with a comma when a period is appropriate.
5) 'Sir, is this man bothering you? Put a closing quote mark at the end of this dialogue.
6) 'Yes, what would you like' asked David. Comma after 'like.'
7) 'When he was 23 years old ... ' Spell out numbers 1-99. There are more cases where you should be spelling out numbers.
8) Capitalize 'internet.'
9) ' ... for a new life in Key West was the smarted decision he had ever made.' 'Smarted' should be 'smartest.'
10) 'WHY?' No need to write in all caps. Writing in all caps is unusual and pulls the reader out of your story while they try to figure out what you mean with all caps. You don't want that. Use italics to emphasize words.
11) ' ... his head tilted down naval gazing.' 'Naval' should be 'navel.'
12) ' ... and yet your intension is to claim you are a persecuted asylum seeker.' said Jeff. Comma after 'seeker.'

I hope this critique will help you polish your all important first chapter. These are just my opinions. Use what works for you and discard the rest.

I'm trying to get "Savannah Fire" ready for a run at the editor's desk in April or May. Would you please read a chapter or two and let me know how I might improve it?

Have a fine day.

Al




Many thanks Al for your fine scrutiny. Much appreciated.

Best regards,

Clive

CarolinaAl wrote 1155 days ago

I read your first chapter.

General comments: Thought-provoking start. Good descriptions. Good tension. Good pacing.

Specific comments on chapter one:
1) Steve who was nearest to him looked around us and answered, 'Yes'. Period goes inside the closing quote mark.
2) 'I want to ask you if ......... When using ellipses ( ... ), only use three dots. Using more than three dots pulls the reader out of your story while they try to determine what you mean with nine dots. You don't want that. There are more cases of using too many dots for ellipses.
3) 'You were saying', said Jeff. Punctuation goes inside the closing quote mark. There are more cases of dialogue punctuation being outside the quote marks.
4) He showed us a thick roll of Tunisian dinar, 'You have a boat, yes?' Period after 'dinar.' The sentence is ordinary narrative and should be punctuated like any narrative sentence. There are more cases of narrative sentences being punctuated with a comma when a period is appropriate.
5) 'Sir, is this man bothering you? Put a closing quote mark at the end of this dialogue.
6) 'Yes, what would you like' asked David. Comma after 'like.'
7) 'When he was 23 years old ... ' Spell out numbers 1-99. There are more cases where you should be spelling out numbers.
8) Capitalize 'internet.'
9) ' ... for a new life in Key West was the smarted decision he had ever made.' 'Smarted' should be 'smartest.'
10) 'WHY?' No need to write in all caps. Writing in all caps is unusual and pulls the reader out of your story while they try to figure out what you mean with all caps. You don't want that. Use italics to emphasize words.
11) ' ... his head tilted down naval gazing.' 'Naval' should be 'navel.'
12) ' ... and yet your intension is to claim you are a persecuted asylum seeker.' said Jeff. Comma after 'seeker.'

I hope this critique will help you polish your all important first chapter. These are just my opinions. Use what works for you and discard the rest.

I'm trying to get "Savannah Fire" ready for a run at the editor's desk in April or May. Would you please read a chapter or two and let me know how I might improve it?

Have a fine day.

Al

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