Book Jacket

 

rank 164
word count 67975
date submitted 11.11.2010
date updated 08.12.2012
genres: Fiction, Thriller, Historical Ficti...
classification: universal
incomplete

Council of the Ark

Forrest Dartt

Did the Maker's plan really work?
Why aren't we in paradise now?
Without the help of these beasts,
we might not be here at all...

 

At the end of the world before our time, the Creator is provoked by men: They exterminate the Maker's giant beasts, and their actions and imaginations are continually wicked. A divine act of retribution on a global scale leaves one prophet and his family in a ship filled with animals. Their task: to rebuild the creation as God originally intended it to be. Noah must warn future generations to avoid a relapse of Eden's collapse. Meanwhile, a sinister rebellion brews on the lower decks...

Though the ark of deliverance is filled with representatives of all living creatures, the dark prince of death is not far behind. His fallen angels drive a wedge between Noah and his youngest son--using the very beasts they preserved--by sowing seeds of selfish resentment. The angel Amsel organizes and equips the ark's council of beasts. Unfettered by the taboo of interfering with free will, the creatures must discover a secret to subdue supernatural forces before the ark settles and its occupants disperse...

 
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tags

angel, animal, ark, battle, beast, betrayal, bible, bull, chick, council, early man, family, fiction, flood, god, historical, leopard, lucifer, noah, ...

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118 comments

 

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LCF Quartet wrote 483 days ago

Hi Forrest,
After checking the pitch on your back cover, and reading 3 randomly chosen chapters from your book, I walked to the cashier to buy Council of the Ark.

I liked the memoir approach which is only focused on important stuff that weaves the story. The names of your characters are unique (but for me, a little hard to remember.) I want to congratulate you for putting such a detailed and deep story together, and for your almost limitless imagination. I also respect the time and enthusiasm you carefully injected into your book project, which makes it stand out in the genre.

I'm sure that the core concept behind your book will be very interesting to discover for the curious, thirsty reader.

6/6 stars and in my Watch List for further feedback as I read on,
Best wishes,
Lucette- Ten Deep Footprints

Dianna Lanser wrote 743 days ago

Forrest,

Council of the Ark is an incredibly, creative and imaginative, and even believable rendition of the Noah story. Mingled amongst the plot are the truths of God’s word and physical glimpses into the unseen world that contends for man’s soul.

Although this story is entertaining in its depiction of how things may have been on the ark, it also serves to teach and warn against the wiles of the devil and our own selfish desires.

Council of the Ark is written in familiar, modern language making the characters and their circumstances very relatable. I know I only touched on the tip of the iceberg, having only read the first two chapters, but measuring the beginning with what lies ahead, I think it’s safe to say, this story will not disappoint in it’s delivery of a spiritual thriller. Six stars!

Dianna Lanser
Nothing But The Blood

mrsdfwt wrote 1037 days ago

I've had my eye on this book for a while, and I'm glad i finally had the opportunity to enjoy it. A fresh look at Noah's Ark, and a chance to ponder on the possibilities. It could've happened this way!
Totally enjoyable, especially the interaction between the species.
Six stars and backed with pleasure.
Maria
Dark of the Moon

mrpostman57 wrote 1246 days ago

What a great read! You are a talented new writer with a real gift for putting a story together. I especially like the way you incorporated Biblical Truths into your story line. Excellent job! You have taken an Old Testament story that is usually written about in childrens books and put a mature slant on it that makes adults keep wanting to read more. I would like to see this book published.

John

Laurence Howard wrote 132 days ago

This deserves to be climbing the charts. Full marks for inventiveness and good writing. The site should award a certain number of places up the leader board for staying power. Hope you make it.
Laurence Howard, The Cross of Goa.

Seringapatam wrote 402 days ago

Forrest, I like what I read here. I think you have a little gem here. I can see that you have given this a lot of thought well before you started to write. A great idea, well written, superb flow to the story, great character descriptions and great narrative. I love it. Well done.
Sean Connolly. British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R) please consider me for a read or watch list wont you? Many thanks. Sean

M Morgan wrote 436 days ago

You know you sometimes start reading something just because, and find it fascinating. Well here you are. A great read that makes you think, which is as good as it gets.

Kennethvision wrote 462 days ago

I read a bit of this book and concluded that you're truly talented. I have a lot to learn from your style of writing. They have no reason not to publish this book. You're a star!

Kenneth

LCF Quartet wrote 483 days ago

Hi Forrest,
After checking the pitch on your back cover, and reading 3 randomly chosen chapters from your book, I walked to the cashier to buy Council of the Ark.

I liked the memoir approach which is only focused on important stuff that weaves the story. The names of your characters are unique (but for me, a little hard to remember.) I want to congratulate you for putting such a detailed and deep story together, and for your almost limitless imagination. I also respect the time and enthusiasm you carefully injected into your book project, which makes it stand out in the genre.

I'm sure that the core concept behind your book will be very interesting to discover for the curious, thirsty reader.

6/6 stars and in my Watch List for further feedback as I read on,
Best wishes,
Lucette- Ten Deep Footprints

fody wrote 492 days ago

Alice, We are not given the names of Noah's wife or daughters-in-law in the scriptures; however, the Book of Jubilees does give the name Emzara. That book was from the second century B.C. and I don't necessarily take it to be fact. Fortunately, there are other traditional writings with various other names given, and upon studying these, I opted to form Hybrids of some of the names I found. Since mine is a fictional work, I felt quite liberated to take some license with it, and I doubt they are offended about it. I am glad to get people asking questions and forging discussions about it, as that was part of my reason for choosing this subject matter to write a story about.

Forrest. Nice name by the way. I read some of your story and was enchanted by it. The little creatures, even though some of them may be fierce, are adorable to me.
The poor little creatures that were overlooked. Reminds me of people in life that are overlooked. Maybe people with disabilities, mental issues, the little child in the playground that is last to be chosen for a game.

Death - it was coming! It would be a disaster of global proportion, and it staggered the mind trying to comprehend how the maker arrived at such a dramatic solution.......since death is a conclusion, should solution be conclusion. I haven't a clue really. You decide.

Noah's sons are Shem, Ham, and Japheth but I thought his wifes name was Emzara. I must be mistaken. I must be thinking of someone else.

This is really enjoyable. Highly starred.
Alice.

Alice Barron wrote 493 days ago

Forrest. Nice name by the way. I read some of your story and was enchanted by it. The little creatures, even though some of them may be fierce, are adorable to me.
The poor little creatures that were overlooked. Reminds me of people in life that are overlooked. Maybe people with disabilities, mental issues, the little child in the playground that is last to be chosen for a game.

Death - it was coming! It would be a disaster of global proportion, and it staggered the mind trying to comprehend how the maker arrived at such a dramatic solution.......since death is a conclusion, should solution be conclusion. I haven't a clue really. You decide.

Noah's sons are Shem, Ham, and Japheth but I thought his wifes name was Emzara. I must be mistaken. I must be thinking of someone else.

This is really enjoyable. Highly starred.
Alice.

Michael2402 wrote 499 days ago

I really like the set up of this book. I like how you've used the water as both cleansing and destructive, depending on your POV. I loved meeting satan and look forward to the chaos that he will no doubt create. His brief interaction with God was amazing and really jumped out at me, making me want to come back and read more.

I think your writing is great, very easy to read and beautifully descriptive. Efficient, but not lacking in any way.

Michael Robertson
Back to Basics

Jaclyn Aurore wrote 500 days ago

Here to read, as promised.

Prologue - enjoyed
I absolutely love the log writing... and how you didn't feel obligated to write every day of the 74, just the important ones. Though, Day 1 it mentions dreaming of rain-forests but not of water. rain-forests make me think immediately of water but that's because i'm naive and ignorant. could you not just say green forests? or does that take away from the imagery...
- big fan of Day 42... Noah and the kindness to the termites particularly
- also liked Day 74 and Nabu's disobedience... not sure about the thing of free will. so the Angel cannot prevent or correct actions, but can the Maker? I thought the whole thing about free will was that it was, you know, free... stupid thing for me to ask... i'm not biblical and i should just assume the Maker can do all and everything.

moving along and further into this book, i am thrilled that the whole thing (at least so far) is written as a log. I've just finished Day 114 and i feel so accomplished!
This is a fun story, easy to read, easy to follow, easy to sink your teeth into... it's just great really. every single 'chapter' i've read, i'm thinking, "ok, i'll just read this and put it down"... and i quickly say "ok just one more chapter"
the only thing i dislike so far, is the cover. it creeps me out. just sayin'

high stars, and thank you for inviting me to read :)

Jaclyn x
It Never Happened

Blancherose wrote 501 days ago

Forrest, This is an interesting take on the story of Noah. Talking animals is not really too far off in the Scriptures, as you well know I am sure. The weasel and the child sounds about right for any family. Sense it was before the establishment of Jewish law when the weasel would have become an unclean pet. They are adorable with their soft silky fur and cute faces, and we can now all see the trouble that is about to occur. The termite? Your books with subtle humor and amusement keeps one turning the pages. Well done!
Blessings Roslyn
"I Am" Through the Ages

Jimmy Wearne wrote 501 days ago

Dr Dolittle meets the bible - I really enjoyed the read - one suggestion - with your opening paragraph I was a little put off with the third sentence - I think the opening would be stronger if you cut it - also many editors do not like "suddenly" - still great read - highly starred

cheers

Jimmy

patio wrote 501 days ago

This a story about Noah, Amsel, the obedient animals and disobedient people who ignore warning of the coming of God. They chose high peek over the ark but they would soon regret.

I appreciate you resurrecting this biblical tale to remind us that time on earth will end. We already know sea level started to rise and soon many cities will vanish.

David Best wrote 501 days ago

Wow, this is certainly brave - and I can honestly say that I've not read anything quite like this before

It's refreshing and very well written and you have done very well with such a challenging premise

David

dbprdctns wrote 509 days ago

Very intresting concept. I wonder how you will keep it intresting with a nearly omniscient character in the mix, so far so good!

C. G. Spaulding

fody wrote 510 days ago

Peter B, Yes, as a matter of fact, I did say; how long it took for the animals to show up (obviously not gathered by Noah's family because God only told Noah to take the animals aboard seven days before he shut the door. God made that happen; how they had food for all the species aboard for a year, the deck of the ark was a garden larger than a football field; what they did with the manure, which was consumed by the quickly reproducing insects and used to enrich the waters around the ark with nitrogen to improve their fishing endeavors to feed the carnivores and the humans; and i had no problem interpreting the clean and unclean animals and how many pairs of each. The Bible is quite clear about it and it is easy to research on the internet. Of course, this is a fictional treatment of the Biblical account, with which I took some license, but it was thoroughly researched and plausibly explained for those, like yourself, who seem to have trouble stretching their mind to comprehend the undertaking of Noah's divinely inspired mission. Feel free to criticize my novel after you have read it, but your comments make it obvious that you haven't yet done so. Thanks anyway!

Neat story to embellish on. I know it was fiction, but you didn't say how long it took for them beforehand, to gather and store more than a million pounds of food for every animal on earth, which had to last for a year. Pandas only eat bamboo, koalas only eat euchalyptus, some animals eat other animals, reptiles and snakes eat animals and insects, some insects eat other insects which would require extra insects. And wouldn't manure detail have been a full time chore?

There are questions, of course, how two of every animal from Australia got to and back home from the ark, and the same with North and South America. There are a number of specialized species in isloated locations that make a global deluge questionable.

And there is nothing in the Bible that says Lucifer was ever the name of the devil. That came a thousand years or more after Isaiah's time, when the Hebrew was translated into Latin. And you got the meaning of "clean animals" (for sacrifice), spot on too! The unclean animals were one pair, the clean animals were seven pair.
Cool job, Peter B.
"The Bible I Thought I Knew"

Peter B wrote 510 days ago

Neat story to embellish on. I know it was fiction, but you didn't say how long it took for them beforehand, to gather and store more than a million pounds of food for every animal on earth, which had to last for a year. Pandas only eat bamboo, koalas only eat euchalyptus, some animals eat other animals, reptiles and snakes eat animals and insects, some insects eat other insects which would require extra insects. And wouldn't manure detail have been a full time chore?

There are questions, of course, how two of every animal from Australia got to and back home from the ark, and the same with North and South America. There are a number of specialized species in isloated locations that make a global deluge questionable.

And there is nothing in the Bible that says Lucifer was ever the name of the devil. That came a thousand years or more after Isaiah's time, when the Hebrew was translated into Latin. And you got the meaning of "clean animals" (for sacrifice), spot on too! The unclean animals were one pair, the clean animals were seven pair.
Cool job, Peter B.
"The Bible I Thought I Knew"

Abby Vandiver wrote 529 days ago

This is a very interesting concept. I like ut. The writing is good. Interested to see how it turns out.

Good job.

Abby

Abby Vandiver wrote 584 days ago

A spin on the Biblical story. I think that you did a good job, but hopefully those that don't really know the story won't get confused.

Good job.

Abby

Kenneth Edward Lim wrote 664 days ago

Forrest,
Noah's Ark meets Animal Farm, I say, and I don't think I'm too far off. You certainly pull this premise off amazingly well with your characterizations of the creatures Noah is rescuing for life after the Great Deluge. The inclusion of fallen angels bent on fomenting unrest among Noah's animals is a clever embellishment of the tale, especially with the dumb creatures becoming vocal and revealing all-too-human traits. Your narrative prose is straightforward and unencumbered, your dialogue from the heart, making for a delightful read. Thank you so much for sharing..

Kenneth Edward Lim
The North Korean

miracleangel20 wrote 721 days ago

forrest, its samantha your book is amazing keep writing. i love how you come up with amazing stories

miracleangel20 wrote 721 days ago

forrest, its samantha your book is amazing keep writing. i love how you come up with amazing stories

miracleangel20 wrote 721 days ago

forrest, its samantha your book is amazing keep writing. i love how you come up with amazing stories

Shelby Z. wrote 728 days ago

Read part of your first chapter. It opens with a mysterious thrill to it.
This is very creatively written to say the least. You took a lot of time to come up with this idea.
It is well developed with different POV.
Your pitch is well written.
Good work with your book.
Best wishes.

Shelby Z./Driving Winds

Dianna Lanser wrote 743 days ago

Forrest,

Council of the Ark is an incredibly, creative and imaginative, and even believable rendition of the Noah story. Mingled amongst the plot are the truths of God’s word and physical glimpses into the unseen world that contends for man’s soul.

Although this story is entertaining in its depiction of how things may have been on the ark, it also serves to teach and warn against the wiles of the devil and our own selfish desires.

Council of the Ark is written in familiar, modern language making the characters and their circumstances very relatable. I know I only touched on the tip of the iceberg, having only read the first two chapters, but measuring the beginning with what lies ahead, I think it’s safe to say, this story will not disappoint in it’s delivery of a spiritual thriller. Six stars!

Dianna Lanser
Nothing But The Blood

Bridget Sherman wrote 871 days ago

LOVE IT!
Blessing,
Bridget

adamsinnott wrote 884 days ago

One of the best books I have ever read. I would suggest it to anyone.

JamesRevoir wrote 914 days ago

Hello Forrest:

This is certainly a wonderfully written story, and even in novel form its language is simple yet creative enough be enjoyed even by young children. You have done a masterful job of filling in the blanks to bring the Flood account to life in a whole new way.

Well done!

Blessings.

James

dnssx3 wrote 988 days ago

Wow! Totally impressed Forrest!

Could not put the book down. Really makes you think about what really could have taken place on the ark. I appreciate the truth using the "Word" also. There are so many other people that I know that I wish could read it. I would absolutely purchase it if/when published!

Debra

Intriguing Trails wrote 1003 days ago

Council of the Ark
Fiction - Narrative - biblical

Fantastic rendition of the story of Noah and the flood. This is an excellent read. Well done.
Pitch, premise, plot, POV, characters, mechanics - all excellent! This book would be a wonderful addition to any Christian bookstore.
I appologize for the abbrievated review, but I have nothing to offer to improve this MS.

Raechel
Echo

faith rose wrote 1005 days ago

I love your refreshing twist on such a familiar, endearing Bible story. You have expertly honed the craft of creating word pirctures, putting the reader right in the story. Two of my favorites are:

"...the morning breeze...skated over the surface of the water unchecked."

"...luminous arch of color bands..."

This is a highly imaginative and charming piece, yet deeply thought-provoking and inspirational... a perfect blend!
Rating with all 6 stars and putting back on my shelf soon. I think it will stay there until you reach the top five. This piece without a doubt deserves publication!

~Faith Rose
Now to Him

mrsdfwt wrote 1037 days ago

I've had my eye on this book for a while, and I'm glad i finally had the opportunity to enjoy it. A fresh look at Noah's Ark, and a chance to ponder on the possibilities. It could've happened this way!
Totally enjoyable, especially the interaction between the species.
Six stars and backed with pleasure.
Maria
Dark of the Moon

Ariel Du Plume wrote 1097 days ago

Authentic, talented writing. Awesome epic!

Ariel
"Merkabah at the centre of the universe."

Ron Mitchell wrote 1107 days ago

Very interesting writing style. I was drawn in by the conversation of the heavenlies, and read on as the storyline progressed. I wish you all the luck in your continued writing and bringing this book to success.
-author of December Gold

Tracy1211 wrote 1119 days ago

Forrest,

I am truly impressed. You are an incredible writer! I enjoyed this book immensely! What a great way to get to the adult reader and help us remember such a simple story but with such deep meaning! Thank you! I hope to see this book published!

Tracy

76saleh wrote 1123 days ago

Awesome book!! Love the talking animals.

Naomi Dathan wrote 1125 days ago

Hi Forrestt – Thanks again for backing Whither Thou Goest. I’m so grateful! Sorry it took me so long to get to Council of the Ark.

I like the concept of this story – great idea for a metaphor

I see that you’re using several different points of view. For example, in the chapter called Distance and Contact (Section 8), the reader experiences the action through someone in the throne room, Amsel, Csak, and Saryosa. There have been many successful books over the years that have done this, but it’s currently frowned on. Try to determine who in the story has the absolute most to lose in the story without getting killed or incapacitated, and stick with that viewpoint as much as possible. Keep the number of other viewpoints to a minimum, and each scene should “belong” to a single character – the reader will experience everything through that character.

Throughout the book, your story is a very heavy on narrative, which tends to put off contemporary readers. Try to reserve narrative for setting time and place at the beginning of chapters and sections and to transition time forward. Keep it brief and then roll right into action. For example, taking a look at the chapter Vision and Blindness (section 5), look at the paragraph beginning, “Csak hummed to himself.” This paragraph tells us what is happening. Try to translate that into *showing,* with beat-by-beat action filtered through your viewpoint character’s perceptions, which is this paragraph is Nabu:

Csak had discovered a cupboard with pots and pans. He wrested a pot lid out and made a game of rolling it on end around the kitchen floor. When it lost momentum it fell with a metallic clatter. He hummed to himself as he manipulated it back onto its end and got it rolling again. Nabu felt a stab. He’d gotten so independent since he came down here. It was good for him, but . . .

Of course, you’d do it your way, but hopefully you see what I mean. I’ve skimmed through your book and this heavy narrative is a problem throughout. The good news is, you’ve done the hard part – figuring out what is going to happen. It’s relatively simple now (and fun) to go through and bring each paragraph to life.

Best of luck with this book!

SusieGulick wrote 1145 days ago

How totally wonderful you are, Forrest!! Thank you from the bottom of my heart for again backing my memoirs/testimony book, to help me be chosen in the top 5 of the editor's desk. :) May God richly bless you, is my prayer. :) Love, Susie :)

eurodan49 wrote 1165 days ago

Hi. I love historicals and strong voices but only had time to read short passages, enough to like and back it. I’ll try to come back for more and a in depth commentary. Tell me which chapter you would like me to pay close attention to?
Meantime, could you please check TO KILL A DEAD MAN?
Thanks.
Dan

Phyllis Burton wrote 1167 days ago

Hello Forrest, I have read several chapters of your wonderful story, Council of the Ark. It explained the story of Noah and The Ark in the most remarkable way. We all remember the story, but your writing brought it all into sharp focus. Your descriptive prose enables the reader to understand what would have happened in the Ark: the squabbles, the smells and above all the realisation that every creature had to endure hardships in order to survive.
I wish you every success with this work. I am shelving it with a high star rating.

Phyllis
PAPER DREAMS & A PASSING STORM

Lynne Ellison wrote 1176 days ago

Interesting take on well-known Bible story

Lynne Ellison

The Green Bronze Mirror

billysunday wrote 1197 days ago

Love the Noah reference and immediately backed Council. If you have the chance, check out 33. Great intro.

Eveleen wrote 1198 days ago

Council of the ark
The ark of Noah, but told differently, it's good
Backed
Lenny Harry
(Like a dot on the horizon)

Lara wrote 1212 days ago

I was tickled pink by this, especially when it came to the rat's responses to wine-drinking. It's one of those cross-over novels, like Animal Farm, which can entertain on several levels. High stars. Lara
GOOD FOR HIM

ClaireLouise wrote 1227 days ago

This is terrific! On my WL! Best wishes, Claire

karenrosario wrote 1228 days ago

I wondered if the name 'Amsel' means anything? I am always fascintated by names and the choices behind them. Is there a story to it, or just a name you liked?!
The bit with the termites made me smile! I really liked the little snapshots into the thoughts and perceptions of various people/animals aboard the ark. At times, however, I was itching to be more deeply moved. Perhaps more emotion or to be able to reach more deeply into the thoughts and feelings of those concerned.
I LOVED the bit about Nabu and the weasel- that's the kind of detail of emotion that I would love to see more of, particular in the earlier passages. For me, this is where the story begins to get interesting!

fody wrote 1230 days ago

Glad to see this new book building momentum. It's worthy!!!
byzestuf

E Z wrote 1230 days ago

Great Book Forrest See ya buddy EZMONEY

Frank James wrote 1232 days ago

Hi Forrest,
I'm pretty sure I read your book and commented on it under the old voting system and I'm just as impressed now as I was then. Your writing skills are really to be admired and you have left us with a brilliant read and one that is heading for the Editors desk and well deserved. I like it and as is usual with me, if I like it I give it my BACKING and it goes on my shelf now. Good luck and I'm sure you will be up there at the top quite soon.

Frank James (The Contractor)

SE Champenby wrote 1232 days ago

Good, but a bit too preachy.

greeneyes1660 wrote 1233 days ago

Forrest, Drawing from a popular Biblical story that has been widely told was brilliant. It allows for your premise and POV to be easily accepted and pondered. I love the use of the weasel beig the stow away , very clever.
The reindroduction of free will and it's consequences when not fully thought out for me knocks the storyline out of the park.
Well paced and written, extremely creative and most importantly thought-provoking...Backed with ease Patricia aka Columbia Layers of the Heart

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