Book Jacket

 

rank 2037
word count 36606
date submitted 08.12.2010
date updated 19.12.2011
genres: Literary Fiction, Romance, Comedy
classification: universal
incomplete

The Year of Living Philosophically

Robert Grossmith

Can philosophy improve the love life of terminally single Dave Gardner? From hedonist and stoic to existentialist and postmodernist, he tries to find out.

 

Bored with his job as a bilingual dictionary editor at a Norwich publishing house, Dave decides to spend the next twelve months living according to the prescriptions of twelve different philosophies, one each month, chosen at random from a Duffer's Guide to philosophy. His purpose is to see whether any of these philosophical systems will improve his blighted existence and aid his pursuit of the office hottie, Vanessa.
Trouble is, Vanessa's already engaged to the dodgy (and mysteriously wealthy) Dominic. Dave suspects Dom of nefarious activities -- cigarette smuggling? cannabis farming? -- and turns detective in order to expose him, with unexpected results. So overpowering is Dave's infatuation with Vanessa that he barely notices the attention he's receiving from another colleague, the eminently more suitable new secretary Jo.
Month after month, Dave's philosophical experiment backfires in spectacular fashion. His pain-control exercises during his stoic month leave him requiring urgent medical attention. His attempts to live as a rationalist, an empiricist and a logical positivist -- whatever that is -- bring further disasters. As New Year's Eve approaches, he finds himself jobless, penniless, friendless and more single than ever, with only one day left in which to turn his life around.

 
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June: the Machiavellian

Tues, Jun 1

Amanda has instituted an Editor of the Month scheme in a bid to increase efficiency and improve productivity. Actually the scheme includes ass eds to make up the numbers because there are only 5 editors or senior editors, including Vanessa, who's on holiday.

    Everyone has been given a set of targets, whether it's number of words to compile or number of pages to proofread. The task of running the scheme and collecting the figures from everyone at the end of the month will rotate among all the editors and ass eds on a monthly basis but this month it will fall to Belinda. She's not a happy bunny. A prize of £100 of gift vouchers from a store of the winner's choice will be awarded to the editor or ass ed who comes top each month, with a consolation prize of £50 for the runner-up and £25 for the third.

    It's the only thing people are talking about.

    'It's an outrage,' Jerome said. 'Doesn't she understand we're not robots? You can't take business practices from industry and expect them to work in the rarefied atmosphere of a publishing house. Lexicography's an art!'

    'How can we guarantee we'll meet our targets,' Aysha said, 'when we're dealing with freelancers who suddenly decide to go on holiday for a few weeks without telling you? It's not fair! It's mad!'

    Personally, I couldn't give a damn about winning the competition but I certainly don't want to come last. I'll have to make absolutely sure I meet my targets this month.

    I'm hoping my chosen philosophy for June may give me an edge in the competition. Duffers defines Machiavellism as 'a set of political principles proposed by Niccolo Machiavelli (1469-1527) in The Prince and other writings, according to which rulers can best advance the interests of their states and themselves through the often amoral and opportunistic manipulation of others.'

    I'm looking forward to learning how to manipulate others, it sounds like it could be a very useful skill. At least I won't have to subscribe to another set of crackpot spiritual beliefs: the entry directly below Machiavellism is Manichaeism, which seems to have been a religion related to Gnosticism. Thank you, Niccolo, for saving me from that.

 

Weds, Jun 2 

Bought a copy of The Prince at lunchtime and nearly finished it already. It's a very short book. I didn't read it from cover to cover, just sort of dipped in here and there but I quickly got the gist. I was particularly taken with the title of Ch X1X, 'One should avoid being despised or hated,' which sounds like very good advice, if a little obvious. I took a sheet of paper and made a list of bullet-point paraphrases:

·          good results can come from evil actions

·          be publicly above reproach while privately acting amorally to achieve your ends

·          overcome obstacles through force or cunning

·          better to be feared than loved

·          men are always treacherous unless forced to be honest

·          if you have to be cruel, do it quickly and get it over with so everyone can move on

·          always take sides in a fight, never be neutral, because neither victor nor vanquished will thank you for not going to their aid

·          kill those who have the means or motive to harm you

    To be honest, it doesn't sound like much of a philosophy, more like a justification for behaving like a complete bastard. But hey, let's not pre-judge things, let's suck it and see. Maybe skip the killing though.

 

Thurs, Jun 3

With Vanessa away on holiday, the office seems like a desert. Every time I pass her cubicle and see all the photos and newspaper clippings and little Post-It notes to herself plastered across the walls, it feels like walking past the house of a dead person. I keep imagining Van and Dom in the Seychelles together – what they might be doing, how often they're having sex, that sort of thing -- but it's too painful, I have to force myself to stop.

    Been thinking about my own holiday plans. Told Amanda I'd like to take 2 of my 3 weeks' annual leave at the start of next month. Not sure what I'll do yet. I'm thinking of leaving it to the philosophy to decide, to go wherever next month's philosophy takes me. For example, in Jan, Feb and April this year I'd have gone to Greece (Atomists, hedonists, Plato). In March I'd have gone to Rome (Stoic) and in April to the Middle East (Gnostic). This month would have taken me to Italy again. The good thing is that all these places are warm and sunny. I'm just hoping there aren't any philosophies that originated in Siberia.

 

Fri, Jun 4

Spent half the afternoon trying to teach one of the ass eds, a girl called Dannii with 2 i's, how to use the British National Corpus, to which all the editors have access. She's Amanda's niece and I think Amanda's grooming her for an editorial role when one becomes available. But the girl's a complete space cadet! She hasn't got a clue. I was showing her how you can call up the collocations of a particular word – the other words that typically occur in the immediate environment of that word – when she stifled a yawn and looked at her fingernails and said, 'So what exactly is a corpus then?'

    I'm reminded of one of my favourite quotations from The Prince:

There are three types of intellect: one that works things out for itself, a second that appreciates what others work out, and a third that cannot work anything out either on its own or through the example of others. The first is the best, the second is good, and the third is completely useless.

 

Sat, Jun 5

Party at Ian and Lee's place. Drunken conversation with Lee in which I tried to explain Machiavelli's political principles to him. Turned out he thought I was talking about the Italian PM, Berlusconi. Probably not a lot of difference, if truth be told.

    'Machiavelli?' Ian said, coming in on the end of the conversation. 'Doesn't he play for Chelsea?'

 

Mon, Jun 7

Big argument at work today between Jerome and Belinda, which I got caught in the middle of.

    It all started this morning. The three of us were having coffee together and Jerome said something about offering to look through some files for Belinda, who's spending so much time running  the Editor of the Month scheme that she's barely got any time left for her own editorial work.

    Then, late this afternoon, it all kicked off. I heard raised voices coming from Jerome's cubicle and went to see what all the fuss was about.

    'You said you'd do it today, Jerome,' Belinda was saying. 'That is what you said.'

    'I said no such thing, Belinda. I said I'd look at the files some time this week, I distinctly remember it.'

    'You didn't, Jerome, you said today.'

    Jerome turned to me as I entered the cubicle.

    'You were there, Dave. This morning. When we were talking about me taking on some of Belinda's files. Back me up here. Did I or did I not say I'll do it some time this week. And not necessarily today, as Belinda seems to think.'

    To be honest, I had no idea what Jerome had said, I'd been thinking about Vanessa at the time and how lonely the office felt without her. But I remembered Machiavelli's advice about never sitting on the fence, always taking sides in a fight. And it seemed to me that, for this month at least, I was better off siding with Belinda than with Jerome, seeing as how she was in charge of the Editor of the Month scheme.

    'No, you definitely said today, Jerome,' I said. 'I distinctly remember it.'

    'Thank you, Dave,' Belinda said, crossing her arms tightly across her chest in a satisfied way.

    Jerome threw up his hands in the air. 'Infamy! Infamy! They've all got it in for me!'

    I left them to it but when I saw Jerome on my way to the car park after work he snarled at me and pretended to spit on the ground.

 

Tues, Jun 8

Amanda dropped by my cubicle this afternoon to ask how Dannii was getting on with her training. I had to think quickly. If I'm honest, I thought, and tell her she's completely hopeless, it will reflect poorly on me as a teacher. In addition, Amanda may ask me to give her more training. Whereas if I lie and say she's doing really well, I'll go up in Amanda's estimation and she may even decide the training Dannii's already received is sufficient.

    'She's coming along great,' I said. 'Picked it up with no trouble.'

    Amanda looked surprised. 'Really?' She leaned in close to my ear. 'Entre nous, she hasn't got a lot up top.'

    I assumed she was referring to Dannii's brain rather than her breasts, because in point of fact she was quite well-endowed for one so young.

    'Well in that case,' Amanda went on, 'you should give her another session. Show her the phonetics database, will you?'

 

Weds, Jun 9

Made the mistake of asking Belinda how she was coping with the extra work entailed by the Editor of the Month scheme.

    Her shoulders sagged, as if bowing under a heavy weight. 'It's ridiculous. Amanda just doesn't understand how much work's involved. Jerome was going to help me out, take over some of my editorial work. Well you were there, weren't you? But he's hopeless, he's so unreliable.'

    She hesitated, then tilted her head downwards and raised her cornflower-blue eyes up to mine in a coquettish Princess Diana kind of way. 'You couldn't help me out, could you, Dave? You were so good to come to my rescue yesterday in that stupid bloody argument. Just a few hours now and then, that's all I'm asking. It'd be such a help.'

    Not sure what Machiavelli would have said in reply. Fuck off, you ungrateful bitch, perhaps. But I felt I had to say yes. So now I'm going to find it even harder to meet this month's targets. Wish I'd never got involved in that bloody stupid argument in the first place.

 

Thurs, Jun 10

Went to Belinda's cubicle this afternoon to collect the new words files I offered to help her with. She was just coming back from lunch. I waited while she logged on to her computer, pretending not to see the password she keyed in: ADNILEB, her name spelled backwards. A dastardly Machiavellian plot has begun brewing in my head in connection with the Editor of the Month scheme, but I think it's too low even for me to consider seriously.

 

Fri, Jun 11

Small presentation in honour of Ralph/Wayne's departure. Someone had the bright idea of giving him Wayne Rooney's autobiography as a leaving present. His thankyou speech was delivered through gritted teeth.

 

Sat, Jun 12

Watched England's first World Cup match in a Riverside bar with Ian and Lee – a scrappy 1-1 draw with USA. Disappointing, but we should still make quick work of minions like Algeria and Slovenia.

 

Mon, Jun 14

Squash with Max. Afterwards, in the bar, he filled me in on the background to The Prince – 'it's statecraft rather than philosophy' -- always referring to the book by its Italian title, Il Principe.

    'Machiavelli was from Florence, you know, which was a republic at the time and where I'm from too. When the republic was dissolved around 1512 Machiavelli was imprisoned for conspiracy and tortured. The torture consisted of hanging him from his wrists, which were tied behind his back. This forced the arms to bear the body's full weight and thus dislocated the shoulders.'

    'Ouch,' I said.

    Max's reference to his coming from Florence made me realize I knew almost nothing about his private life. Was he married? Did he have kids? When did he move to the UK? Did he still have family back in Italy? I put these questions to him and he answered them briefly and somewhat perfunctorily, as if they were minor matters of no great importance. I learned he has 2 grown-up kids, a boy who's a lawyer in Paris and a girl who's a teacher in Edinburgh. He's been married for nearly 30 years and his wife's name is Megan. She's Welsh and teaches sculpture at the College of Art.

    I asked him what he does all day, now he's retired, and he admitted somewhat shyly that he was writing a novel.

    'That's something I'd like to do one day,' I said. 'I'm keeping a diary. Maybe I could turn that into a novel.'

    'It's an idea,' he said.

    I inquired what his novel was about but he got very cagey and refused to say beyond describing it as 'a sort of philosophical novel,' which is no surprise, I suppose. He said he started it in April and had been working really hard on it, it was nearly half-written already. He said he aimed to finish it by the end of the year.

    'Well I hope I get the chance to read it. It sounds really interesting, even if you won't tell me what it's about.'

    'And I'd like you to read it, really. I'm curious to hear your opinion. But not till it's finished. I'll send you a copy as soon as I've written the last word, that's a promise.'

 

 

Chapters

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YvonneMarjot wrote 336 days ago

This is great! Most fun I've ever had studying philosophy, and I've only got through Determinism and Hedonism so far. I love Dave's voice - how can someone so apparently superficial do such a good job of presenting these philosophies? At first I struggled with the diary format - it didn't seem to flow well - but now my mind's got itself round the format I'm really enjoying it. I haven't spotted any obvious typos and I really have no complaint about your writing style. I'll come back to you later if I have anything useful to say, but at the moment I'm just happy to back you and keep on reading. Best wishes, Yvonne.

Carol Repton wrote 364 days ago

This is hilarious, Robert! Reading the first three chapters kept me amused all afternoon at work. No, seriously, it reads like a male Bridget Jones' Diary, in a good way. And I'm sure there's a gap in the market for that kind of book - I would buy it.
Dave comes across as a very sympathetic, sensitive soul, obsessed with words and wordplay, which appeals to me, as I'm similarly obsessed. I like the whole concept of the plot as well, of trying out a different philosophy each month - it's original and clever. And it was quite endearing how Dave put so much effort into pursuing each of his randomly picked philosophies.
I like the faux naive, ironic tone of the first-person narrator, and the way his thought processes often contradict what he is saying to the other characters. I love the setting in the publishing house with its dictionaries from the most obscure countries imaginable! And I especially like Dave's desperate infatuation with the seemingly unattainable Vanessa. The description of Vanessa in the car in chapter 1 spoke volumes about how Dave felt about her, and skilfully used a lot of "gl" words at the same time, so it was both poignant and ironic.
Dave's affair with Trouble in chapter 3 in his pursuit of Hedonism was very funny, and it was quite telling that this still didn't make him happy.
I have very little to fault with this. Just a few minor points:-
I think it would be better not to abbreviate certain words but write them out in full, e.g. "Xmas", "Sat", and to write out numerals.
chapter 1 - "With a certain trepidation..." - I think you may have meant "With some trepidation..."?
typo - "It was as I was having these..."
chapter 2 - spelling - "plastic stationery tray"
I enjoyed this, and will be back to read more...

Carol
Worst Case Scenario

Ray007 wrote 1231 days ago

Wow! There are not many books (hardly any in fact) which make me laugh out loud, but this one has on many occasions. Can't wait to read the rest. The fact that it is thought-provoking, sensitively crafted, very well-written, and manages to convey complex ideas ('philosophies') in such a natural and engaging narrative way is all the more to its credit. I generally find books either slop or onerously hard-going. For me, Robert Grossmith hits just the right spot: : A funny, intelligent, and most enjoyable read. In a word - classy.

mick hanson wrote 945 days ago

This is really good fun. It moves well and is highly entertaining, and the last paragraph where he uses determinism in a practical sense gave me a dose of the giggles. I cringed, I just couldn't help it. Excellent and backed - Wilfred

belia wrote 959 days ago

Original, knowledgable, clever, funny, irresistible... Backed and starred.

All the best, and honestly hoping to see it in print.

Evangeline (belia)

YvonneMarjot wrote 336 days ago

This is great! Most fun I've ever had studying philosophy, and I've only got through Determinism and Hedonism so far. I love Dave's voice - how can someone so apparently superficial do such a good job of presenting these philosophies? At first I struggled with the diary format - it didn't seem to flow well - but now my mind's got itself round the format I'm really enjoying it. I haven't spotted any obvious typos and I really have no complaint about your writing style. I'll come back to you later if I have anything useful to say, but at the moment I'm just happy to back you and keep on reading. Best wishes, Yvonne.

Carol Repton wrote 364 days ago

This is hilarious, Robert! Reading the first three chapters kept me amused all afternoon at work. No, seriously, it reads like a male Bridget Jones' Diary, in a good way. And I'm sure there's a gap in the market for that kind of book - I would buy it.
Dave comes across as a very sympathetic, sensitive soul, obsessed with words and wordplay, which appeals to me, as I'm similarly obsessed. I like the whole concept of the plot as well, of trying out a different philosophy each month - it's original and clever. And it was quite endearing how Dave put so much effort into pursuing each of his randomly picked philosophies.
I like the faux naive, ironic tone of the first-person narrator, and the way his thought processes often contradict what he is saying to the other characters. I love the setting in the publishing house with its dictionaries from the most obscure countries imaginable! And I especially like Dave's desperate infatuation with the seemingly unattainable Vanessa. The description of Vanessa in the car in chapter 1 spoke volumes about how Dave felt about her, and skilfully used a lot of "gl" words at the same time, so it was both poignant and ironic.
Dave's affair with Trouble in chapter 3 in his pursuit of Hedonism was very funny, and it was quite telling that this still didn't make him happy.
I have very little to fault with this. Just a few minor points:-
I think it would be better not to abbreviate certain words but write them out in full, e.g. "Xmas", "Sat", and to write out numerals.
chapter 1 - "With a certain trepidation..." - I think you may have meant "With some trepidation..."?
typo - "It was as I was having these..."
chapter 2 - spelling - "plastic stationery tray"
I enjoyed this, and will be back to read more...

Carol
Worst Case Scenario

Juliet Ann wrote 855 days ago

About to begin Platonist - really enjoying it. One minor point is it Cat or Trouble?

mick hanson wrote 945 days ago

This is really good fun. It moves well and is highly entertaining, and the last paragraph where he uses determinism in a practical sense gave me a dose of the giggles. I cringed, I just couldn't help it. Excellent and backed - Wilfred

Laura Bailey wrote 954 days ago

Hi Robert,

Thanks for the read, I enjoyed this. I like your modern take contrasted with age-old philosophy. I also like how you subtly move between tenses and I think in the first chapter you introduce Vanessa well.

My nitpick would be from the first chapter, I'm not sure that Jerome is fully believable. On the one hand he seems a tad geeky and he has hairy hands but on the other, he seems very brash and I'd imagine polished if he is able to kiss a group of girls, one of whom in particular is "not bad". I don't think that woulld take much fixing. I'd perhaps go either a bit geeky and in his drunken mindset he tries it on with the girls but they knock him back or kiss him then giggle etc. Or, go for the polished approach and remove the reference to the hairy hand and have him in a suit and smart hair etc. Something like that, anyway. Obviously this is just a suggestion but I do think it would just tie up your opening, which I think is engaging.

Hope this is useful.

Best wishes,

Laura
Beneath The Blossom Tree

CBK wrote 957 days ago

A great idea - obviously there is a danger of being seen as just copying other books with a similar premise theme - but that doesn't bother me one bit - even just reading the pitch makes me want to see the impact these different philosphies has on your everyday life - backed and 5 stars.

CBK

Robert Grossmith wrote 958 days ago

Thanks for the comments on the book, which I'll take on board. I wish you'd read more than the first day though -- the consensus is that it gets better with each chapter. Glad you like the Norwich location too. It happens to be where I live but you're right, it is under-represented in fiction (and Norfolk's always good for a few cheap laughs). Jeeves & Wooster: hadn't thought of that but, yes, I can see it. But perhaps more like Withnail & I.

iandsmith wrote 958 days ago

Congratulations on Wednesday one to watch. It’s always a good choice, and this one is no exception.

So here’s my bit: I know it’s New Years Day, but hangovers in novels? It’s great. I have no problems with hangovers, but I’ve seen three hangovers this week on authonomy. There must be new ways to say the same thing: they overdosed on something suspect from the garden centre perhaps. Maybe they stagger out on New Years Day, and are suddenly struck by that disease that turns your bones to biscuit.

Anyway, getting over the hangover as a way of emphasizing that they’re fun characters, I think Jerome goes into the drunken philosophy far too quickly, for too long, and too coherently to be convincing.

It’s set in Norwich. Fantastic. I looked it up. I maybe wrong, but Ketts Hill, Tombland. Got to be. That’s very interesting. Not London? Not Oxford? Not Cambridge? Not Devon? Excellent. Norwich is a refreshing location for a novel on authonomy.

In fact, Dave and Jerome are very interesting indeed. Despite being drunk, they don’t swear, they get away with fondling women in the street so they can’t be working class or black. They seem to be trying very hard to be straight, and Dave even says, “Maybe they thought I was Jerome’s gay best friend.” They’re likeable, nearly foppish. At one point I thought of Wooster and Jeeves, and imagined it might be Oxford (Magdelen Street) or Cambridge. But no, it’s Norfolk, and that’s good, and I’m not onto January 2nd yet. Maybe they need college scarves, wobbly bicycles. I will Watchlist, and keep an eye on developments. Very good.

belia wrote 959 days ago

Original, knowledgable, clever, funny, irresistible... Backed and starred.

All the best, and honestly hoping to see it in print.

Evangeline (belia)

xavant wrote 1005 days ago

At last I've come across a piece of fiction on this site that isn't escapist but that engages instead with the everyday in a thought-provoking, intelligent and witty narrative - and that's also impeccably written. In the three chapters I've read you've managed to portray the narrator's philosophical explorations in a readable, easily assimilable way. You've done this of course by admirably concrete applications of the different systems, rooted in laddish reality. The diary form is well chosen, too, since it creates an intimate narrative voice that draws in readers who might otherwise find the subject of a wide-ranging philosophical investigation - even in the jokey approach you've employed - a little daunting. When I say the writing is impeccable, I mean of course that it is, unusually here, technically flawless and is also a consistently well maintained fusion of the demotic and the intellectual.
I'm not sure how well this would sell, but I'd hope there's enough of an intelligent readership out there to make it commercially viable on a modest scale. Here it's unjust that it's found a place on only seven bookshelves. I'm making that eight and I'm also six-starring it. Good luck with it.
Xavant
That Certain Feeling

Steve Kata wrote 1018 days ago

Your book is very well written. Only a few typos I'm sure you'll fix in the editorial process. I like your writing style and the diary format makes the read move along quickly. I've had a lifelong interest in philosophy (and humor) myself, so I'm interested in seeing where you go with this. I've starred and watched it. I wouldn't mind at all if you checked out my 'Renouncing the Future.' You might find it fun

Best,
Steve

Chris Brown wrote 1210 days ago

Over the last few years, I've started reading many books on here, but I've only got past chapter 1 on a minimal number of occasions, It took me a while to warm to your main guy, but by mid february, I sure have and the general idea is brilliant - I want to keep reading just to see what you'll do with the next philosophical bent. And your MC gets more believable as time goes on. In ch1, you can't quite work out why he'd be interested in phillosophy and it all looks like a plot device but after that, it's all very natural and one starts to strongly empathise. If you rework ch 1 a little to make it more believable, I think I might actually pay money...

Roman N Marek wrote 1226 days ago

This is a lovely and amusing idea. It brings to mind that long line of diary-writing duffers who have gone before: Pooter, Adrian Mole, Simon Crisp and (my personal favourite) Darren Tackle. (You’re not by an chance a descendant of George or Weedon, are you?? Or does everyone ask you that?) Having said that, they are all hard acts to follow and, for me, the early chapters don’t quite make it. I wondered whether they are strong enough to hook the general reader. They’re still an interesting read, but the incidents are only sporadically amusing (containing some lovely ideas and nice lines, mind). However, come Chapter 5, with the pain-control episode and the ‘bizarre ironing accident’, and it all takes off. This part was really funny, and after that I found myself sitting back and enjoying the book more and more. Perhaps, until that point, the MC hadn’t been foolish or Pooterish enough. But here he is shown to be a right idiot – which is funny. And from that point on, I loved it. Now I’m puzzled why I didn’t like the first four chapters so much. Maybe I was just having a bad day(!). Let’s see if anyone else has the same impression, or the same bad day. I’m glad I persevered beyond Chapter 4 as the rest of it has put a smile on my face!

Ray007 wrote 1231 days ago

Wow! There are not many books (hardly any in fact) which make me laugh out loud, but this one has on many occasions. Can't wait to read the rest. The fact that it is thought-provoking, sensitively crafted, very well-written, and manages to convey complex ideas ('philosophies') in such a natural and engaging narrative way is all the more to its credit. I generally find books either slop or onerously hard-going. For me, Robert Grossmith hits just the right spot: : A funny, intelligent, and most enjoyable read. In a word - classy.

Ray007 wrote 1231 days ago

Wow! There are not many books (hardly any in fact) which make me laugh out loud, but this one has on many occasions. Can't wait to read the rest. The fact that it is thought-provoking, sensitively crafted, very well-written, and manages to convey complex ideas ('philosophies') in such a natural and engaging narrative way is all the more to its credit. I generally find books either slop or onerously hard-going. For me, Robert Grossmith hits just the right spot: : A funny, intelligent, and most enjoyable read. Classy!

Tim Andrewartha wrote 1232 days ago

I have now enjoyed reading to the end of chapter 3. It's a good introduction to different kinds of philosophy as well as being entertaining fiction. The Monday lunch time disco is most amusing. In chapter 2 it says: "Did nothing rest of the day." I thought this should be "Did nothing for the rest of the day." Tim

lindajabo wrote 1232 days ago

Love it and it keeps getting better!

SusieGulick wrote 1233 days ago

Dear Robert, I love that you tell in your pitch, that Dave is having a different philosophical life each month & your books is his keeping a diary of his experiences in it :) - what a wonderful idea. :) I didn't even know that there were that many different philosophies, even. :) "Love is a serious mental disease" made me laugh at Plato's quote. "Moon Goddess" was good :) - if I were he, I would have chanced it with his family. :) "Fortune is like a woman" was pretty bad , but I don't know if being hung by his hands at his back was a good punishment for all of his evil :( - must have really happened, so I'm glad I wasn't him :) - I laughed at the "manipulating others" goal. :( I learned so much in your book, you wouldn't believe. :) I have read, commented on, & put your book on my watchlist to read & to at least 24 hour back when space opens on my bookshelf. :) I have also gold ******-rated your book :) - could you please ****** & back my memoirs/testimony book, in return? :) Thank you from the bottom of my heart. :) Love, Susie :) p.s. every ******-ing & at least 24 hour backing moves our book up on authonomy lists :) - click on author's name, scroll down on their profile page, click on their book cover or title :) - & you are on your way :)
None of this comment is copy/pasted & is written my best from my heart. :)

piabjo wrote 1233 days ago

My rating is 5 star! Hope more will read it!
Björk

piabjo wrote 1233 days ago

Great Book!
Have read all of it when does the next chapter arrive?
PB

Robert Grossmith wrote 1233 days ago

Thanks for the compliments, Tim -- and the typo! Hope you read on.

This is brilliant. I read the first chapter and I really enjoyed it. It's a great idea, witty and well written. It's easy to feel sympathy for the MC and to follow his thoughts. The dialogue is natural too. I spotted one typo. "I thought he was gong to say." According determinism then it was already decided that I would stumble on this amusing book and happily back it. I will return to read more at some point.
Tim
VITALITY

Tim Andrewartha wrote 1233 days ago

This is brilliant. I read the first chapter and I really enjoyed it. It's a great idea, witty and well written. It's easy to feel sympathy for the MC and to follow his thoughts. The dialogue is natural too. I spotted one typo. "I thought he was gong to say." According determinism then it was already decided that I would stumble on this amusing book and happily back it. I will return to read more at some point.
Tim
VITALITY

SusieGulick wrote 1233 days ago

:) I will comment after I've read your book - read & commented on 9 hours later :)

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