Book Jacket

 

rank 300
word count 42391
date submitted 10.01.2011
date updated 20.04.2014
genres: Non-fiction, Popular Culture, Harpe...
classification: universal
complete

FINDING LAURIE

Michael Schwed

When you lose something you make an effort to find it. When the something you lost is your precious child you will search forever.

 

In 1977 my beautiful five year old daughter died suddenly. There were signs signalling the coming tragedy, signs I failed to recognize. Following her death there were other signs telling me she was not gone forever but would somehow return. This book spans the thirty three years it took for me to find her. Some might call this a book about reincarnation, but, I call it finding Laurie..

 
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103 comments

 

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wanjie684 wrote 2 days ago

Michael: So far I love the two chapters I have read. I will put your book on my bookshelf, and continue reading whenever I get time.
The glitches I have noticed will be taken care of during polishing. Example: in chapter 1, the cliché is "if I do say so myself." You can also strike it out and end at prosecutor.

In chapter 2: You don't need "his concerning" synchronistic events. Note: it was among his writings.

If you get time you can look at my book: African Woman, American Adventures

rastafolux wrote 80 days ago

will check it out later, count on my backing

Beautifully written. Compelling read. I am placing this on my bookshelf.
Please do me the honor of reading my book 'Not Really Gone' - we have very similar writing styles.

BarbShaya wrote 80 days ago

Beautifully written. Compelling read. I am placing this on my bookshelf.
Please do me the honor of reading my book 'Not Really Gone' - we have very similar writing styles.

BarbShaya wrote 80 days ago
nenno wrote 146 days ago

I thought I had commented on this but obviously something went wrong. I think this must have been a very cathartic book to right and the detail makes one's stomach turn. One know's the story from the pitch but still, there is an incredulity as one reads on. I have read about three chapters and thought I would read one, and I will still read further. The sheer honesty in your story is enough to turn every page. Well done.
The Tomorrow Thief

VikkiWood wrote 191 days ago

Great blurb... added to my watch list
Vikki Wood
'Living Death'

rastafolux wrote 250 days ago

Thanks for your support. I will take a look at your work and let you know what I think.

I find this compulsive reading and although I have only read a few chapters I intend to continue. There is definitely a market for this and I wish you the very best with it. Backed

CrazyChick wrote 251 days ago

I find this compulsive reading and although I have only read a few chapters I intend to continue. There is definitely a market for this and I wish you the very best with it. Backed

rastafolux wrote 331 days ago

Thanks for your encouraging remarks. I will give your book a look over the weekend.

This is a very interesting and heart-warming story. I have some knowledge of the work of Dr Ian Stevenson (and Dr Jim Tucker) of Virginia University with children who seem to have memories of previous lives, and can recognise this account as authentic. If it were not, there is plenty of scope for the imagination to make the "evidence" all the more striking and convincing.

There are some typos in the book, and some technical flaws - for example, using a period instead of a comma at the end of speech and before the "he said, she said" bit. These are all quite minor but I feel that the book would be much improved by their fixing. But I really enjoyed the read and wish the author well with his writing and his life.

Ralderlan wrote 331 days ago

This is a very interesting and heart-warming story. I have some knowledge of the work of Dr Ian Stevenson (and Dr Jim Tucker) of Virginia University with children who seem to have memories of previous lives, and can recognise this account as authentic. If it were not, there is plenty of scope for the imagination to make the "evidence" all the more striking and convincing.

There are some typos in the book, and some technical flaws - for example, using a period instead of a comma at the end of speech and before the "he said, she said" bit. These are all quite minor but I feel that the book would be much improved by their fixing. But I really enjoyed the read and wish the author well with his writing and his life.

Beverley-Rose wrote 340 days ago

Hi Michael I have recently uploaded my Book Peering through the Past the Museum of Hurt, would appreciate if you could have a look at it and maybe leave me your feedback much obliged. Beverley-Rose

Salley wrote 348 days ago

Michael, I just read the first two chapters of your book, and I am riveted to your story. Your writing is extremely clear and concise. I can't stop with just the first couple of chapters, so I will add your book to my watchlist and return for more!

Best regards,
Sara Alley
Ghost Town

tim templer wrote 366 days ago

Hi Michael

This is a lovely story i was glue to it from the on set. I've only manage to read the first chapter and i really liked it. The way you describe your feelings, emotions and expectations are good. You are on my WL now will come back for more.

Tim Templer

The Journey

Beverley-Rose wrote 367 days ago

When I saw the title I was immediately drawn to read your book and I like it very much from the first chapter that I read, I was in suspense for awhile and waiting to know more but I felt that you were talking at me rather than to me, personally but other than that I liked it very much.

Alice Kahrmann wrote 435 days ago

Hi Michael,

God I was really gripped by this, and touched and it really taps into that universal fear of losing a child - yet it is not self indulgent either... I'll definitely be back for more - in the interim have backed.

A

emarie wrote 454 days ago

Michael, this is such an interesting read. You tell the story so the reader is with you feeling the anxiety as you go through it. You give this story an emotionally real feeling to it. Good job with this.
--emarie
Jackson Jacob Henry Brown, III

HLauren wrote 463 days ago

I believe in signs. And now I believe even more that the veil to the other side is thinner than we imagine, that we are not lost in death, but simply relocated. We are all seeking comfort in what we do not know. Thank you for sharing such beautiful examples. God bless your family.

Best,

Hilary
Killing Karl

Seringapatam wrote 468 days ago

Michael, This is the firsts book on hear that I have not been able to walk away from. it is told in a way that held me right to the last minute and I commend you for writing it. Not only did it feel real as it was, but you told it in a way that I was right there with you. Its a superb account and I am sorry for the loss. I will be supporting this book as its a cracker and with some pushing could go far. Good luck.
Sean Connolly. British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R) Please consider me for a read or Watch List wont you? Happy New Year. Sean

Grace Lyssett wrote 468 days ago

Hello Michael. I have read through your entire book, eager to know how you found Laurie. Within minutes of reading the first chapter I was tingling with what I guess was a similar feeling that you had. Then I became carried away by the story and forgot the earlier feelings, just as you probably did as life did its thing. Your first few chapters are compelling yet there’s a kind of emptiness between the words. We know what that emptiness was.

I cried throughout chapter 4 as your precious Laurie finally died. It is beautifully written with a fast pace, running at the rate that matched my own desire to know what was happening. Then the pace slowed, the spelling and punctuation mistakes jarred my concentration.

In such a stirring true life account it seems pedantic to give feedback on writing style. And yet, as I’m aware in my own true life story, the text needs to be readable. When you have poured out your heart so bravely, it can hurt when someone challenges you on technique. However, in order to be true to you, I will tell you some of my observations. I hope that is OK with you.

Having started with such poignancy it felt to me that you slipped into ‘legal language’, writing a brief for reincarnation, listing rules for consulting mediums, defending the case for research. These paragraphs kept getting in the way of the story of finding Laurie.

I liked the conversational style, yet there are several spelling mistakes, grammatical hiccups, spacing issues, inappropriate capital letters, and punctuation mishaps, which interrupted the flow. Yet, in a way, it seems forgivable that in the moment of distress this is just how we are. As a completed manuscript it would be a good idea to correct them, or get someone else who isn’t involved emotionally to sieve through and put all those niggling little pieces right.

Regarding the chapter GOD THOUGHTS, as you said, ‘you need not read it.’ Why include it then? It doesn’t add to the storyline and is a shame that there is a part of your beautiful story that can be skipped over. Can you not make it all count? I feel drawn to honour Laurie’s life and make EVERYTHING count. She is now dear to my own heart.

As fascinated as I was and am about synchronistic events, the word ‘synchronistic’ began to get on my nerves eventually. You debated it so much. I was already convinced and waiting for the signs and would have liked a chance to make up my own mind.

However, “Goodbye Mom,” brought the tears again, and so did the ending.

I know that we all react according to our own experiences and my reactions may not tally with yours. I wanted to be honest with you Michael, to thank you for sharing your deepest feelings and touching story, and to reassure you, as a psychic myself, that Laurie is indeed part of your life. She has obviously touched many other lives too and I will recommend this book to others.

With Love,
Grace Lyssett

D. A. Quigley wrote 474 days ago

I am very impressed you were able to tell this story. Last year I almost lost my wife three times during a hospital stay: MRSA, blood clots and spinal meningitis. Looking death in the face is not something you ever forget. Telling the story is much harder even. I wish you luck in your journey.

evermoore wrote 483 days ago

Oh, Michael...I ache for all of you, and am so very sorry for your loss. You have shared the pain of that tragedy to honor the love you hold for Laurie. It took so much strength for you to manage it...and you've shared it all in a way that touches me deeply. Six stars and God bless you and yours...and absolutely you found Laurie again!
Linda

Celine Zabel wrote 489 days ago

Michael,

I have read your story. Congratulations on being able to put all of those emotions into words. Your writing is clear and inviting. I could not stop reading. High marks from me.

Best to you and your family,
Celine Zabel
Lives Shattered: One Mother's Loss at the Hands of the Legal System

ella85 wrote 493 days ago

So, I started your book last night, and I came back this afternoon to finish it because I was anxious to finish. There are many things I appreciated about it. First, the writing flowed nicely. I didn't get tripped up in your style, which was genuine and conversational. Your sincerity shone brightly throughout, and I applaud your willingness to let us into some of the darkest times of your life. Even through the darkness, you managed to make it a hopeful book. I could easily see this as a movie. I'm excited to see where this goes for you. Peace to you and your family :)
Lori

Helen Laycock wrote 498 days ago

Michael, you have gone through a trauma that every parent dreads. Once I began reading, I became lost in your book and read right through to the end in one sitting. I had meant to make notes about any slips that you might have made, but they were long-forgotten as you took me with you from the day Laurie was born until the day Lara rode on your foot. Through everything, you have managed to find the positive and I feel surprisingly uplifted by the ending. 'Write the book' you had been told. I am so glad you did! I shall be backing this and awarding a full set of shiny stars!

Helen
Glass Dreams

Lourdes wrote 499 days ago

Michael,
After nine chapters, i still want to know what else you've got to say. The death of your beautiful Laurie was heart- wrenching and i shed a few tears. I don't think there could ever be any worst pain than that of losing a child, and the way you describe all the events puts the reader there, suffering along with you.
I want to know what your later endeavours lead to, so i continue enjoying this inspirational book.
All six stars and placing Finding Laurie in line for the shelf.
Maria
The Path to Survival

Aspiring author wrote 506 days ago

Dear Michael,
First and foremost I am terribly sorry for the loss you suffered. I have just finished reading chapter 4 and am, in this moment, unable to continue, as my son's birthday is July 16th and my Grandmother, who passed away this year, leaving me somewhat of an emotional mess, was born on September 14th. "Coincidence"? But I will continue. You are telling your family's story in such an open, honest and courageous way and everything that you have related is unnervingly familiar. I need to know what happens next. When I can relate to what I am reading, I know that I am reading it for a reason. I believe that this is a book that should be out there for everyone who needs to find it and that your loss, and the fact that you are sharing it, was not for nothing.

Cathy Hardy wrote 515 days ago

Your have expressed your tragedies and fears so eloquently that is is heart wrenching and a pleasure to read. I have your book on my watch list and will put it on my shelf as soon as I am able.

Cathy

Green H wrote 519 days ago

The title sounded interesting, and your Prologue even more. Cannot wait to dig in and comment.

regards
green h

carol jefferies wrote 519 days ago

Hi Michael,

I read your first chapter and feel sorry that you experienced such anxiety and the morbid fear of death which overshadowed your life spoiling the two joys of receiving your healthy daughters into the world.

I have witnessed much death and suffering, and births too, as I have been a midwife and a nurse. Providing the person was old and frail and not in pain, the experience of death I thought as miraculous as a birth. Old people often die of pneumonia often referred to as 'the old person's friend,' as the person seems to fade away in a completely serene way. Never had the world seemed so glorious as the coming of the beautiful dawn after such a dignified death just as much any birth.

Good luck with the book,

Carol



YGPAC wrote 521 days ago

What can I say, nicely written as it reads with ease and keeps you hooked at all times. Still, a very deep touching story and I thank you for sharing it with us and allow us to take this memory trip with you which I feel and understand how hard it must have been for you to write this. Excellent work and once again thanks for this touchingstory

Lara wrote 538 days ago

I read your first five chapters and was riveted. I know this is a true story and comes totally from the heart but instinctively you have written it like a good novel with the hook at the beginning and with increasing pace. Your loving ness shows through all your fluent writing. It is a heartfelt story. I hope it was some help to you in the writing for it is a terrible tragedy for you all to live through. Lara
A RELATIVE INVASION

Christine May wrote 553 days ago

I finished your book today. Being a true believer in Christ, and having had a number of things happen to me to acknowledge the power of a spirtual God I have learned the most impotant thing is love.
You have given a great account of finding the meaning of life. Your book covers so many questions. I am sure that when you die, you will be found again.
Christine

Christine May wrote 554 days ago

Finished the second chapter, I can see now why you would have these anxiety attacks, Grandfather and your father dying so young. I like the way you introduce certain facts that tie into the story.
Christine

Christine May wrote 554 days ago

Read your first chapter, you sound so much like my son, super energetic and sensitive. Your book is well written. Glad I found it.
Christine

susieparker wrote 563 days ago

Michael,

Finding Laurie is a well written but painful story of loss and love and synchronocity. My heart goes out to you.

Backed,
Susie Parker

Odette67 wrote 566 days ago

What a devastating and uplifting story all in one. it has been written very sensitively but honestly. I am sorry for your loos, but what a wonderful piece of writing you have unfolded here.

I wish you the best of luck.

Kate off the rails

Kathie Bondar wrote 581 days ago

Telepathy is the universal means of communication. This is how the fetus in the vomb communicates with his mother, this is how god communicates. Dreams are telepathy in the sleeping state. Freud got himself sidetracked early on, that is why he never got to where I arrived at, but I do need to pay homage to him, he got me started and what a journey it has become.
My study of telepathy/dream interpretation is titled "Voices from the parallel universe". I think it will give you the answers you are seeking.
All the best
Kathie Bondar

Kirrily Whatman wrote 611 days ago

Well, I have just finished your wonderful book. What a tribute to your daughter(s), your parents, your family... your lovely wife! (I have a skeptic husband who keeps me grounded!) .

Michael, I was most definitely meant to read your book. Thank you so much for the confirmations in it for me, someone at least 30 years your junior, as I also put my beliefs and my realisations on the line in my own book about my daughter (Ellanor) and my experiences that could not be seen but usually only happened to me - who would they be believed by??

Honoured to have read this. Good health and long life to you xxxxx

Kirrily
(Into The Bliss: Having & Holding Ellanor)

Kirrily Whatman wrote 611 days ago

Michael, I sit here riveted to your book. So many parallels to my story with my daughter! I'm gobsmacked. Here lies another synchronistic moment, that I should happen across your (and Laurie's) story on Authonomy in the same week I first upload mine for review. As I read, my healthy second child sits (age 6) colouring in, blissfully unaware of what I am reading. She has the same shoe size as Laurie and the black pumps. Ah, heartache. I understand the impact of the death of a child. I understand the yearning to make sense of the only things you are given (dreams, messages, things so noticeable they can't not be taken as important!). You've done a brilliant job conveying this so far to chapter 6.

I'm up to chapter 6 and want to keep reading. What a pace you have set. The way you have woven in your practical thinking and how you try and look at the signs/messages from every which way - like a riddle - is masterful and commands the reader to continue turning the pages.

I look forward immensely to seeing how your journey unfolds and look forward to reading more. Thank you so much for... well, being here! I hope one day you have some time to dip in to my book as well ("Into The Bliss: Having & Holding Ellanor") mainly because I would be interested, from one bereaved parent to another, to see if you can hear any similarities.

There are a number of places I could alert you to changes/typo's needing to be looked at, but I will leave that to commenters who I am sure have already helped you.

Finding Laurie is on my bookshelf already. Best of luck with wherever you hope to take it.

All the best to your family.
Kirrily

Lynne Heffner Ferrante wrote 627 days ago

A very real and profound journey into the devastating world of loss and love, dealing with the awful curves that life throws our way. This is a tender and loving story that is universal in scope and full of insight. It touched me on a very visceral level.

Lynne Heffner Ferrante
An Untenable Fragrance of Violets

Cheryl_Shepherd wrote 630 days ago

I was touched deeply by your book. I have enjoyed it immensely.
Thank you for writing such a wonderful story to share with the world.

Please do come by and take a look at mine some time.

Bless you.

Cheryl.

Keith Gilbey wrote 633 days ago

Michael,

Wow! Honest and true. It takes a long time to heal - but living is what keeps those we have lost alive.
Keith
Peppermint.

mansoor murtuza wrote 641 days ago

Dear Michael Schwed
I will love to hear further unfolding of events. with best regards manesiro@gmail.com

Jane Mauret wrote 649 days ago

Hello, Michael
Stories like this are difficult to tell but I think the distance of time helps with putting it down on paper. You have of course remembered so much of what happened all those years ago. That adds to the emotion in a subtle way as the reader realises, naturally, how such events are impressed on us forever. I am wondering if the book could do with more dialogue rather than reportage which is the only point I could try and make in terms of improving the text.
Jane Mauret

rastafolux wrote 656 days ago

Thanks for your support.

I was sucked in by your pitch and I am so glad I clicked the link to read. This first chapter really captures your attention. It is raw and powerful. I look forward to reading the rest.

Danielle_Boo wrote 656 days ago

I was sucked in by your pitch and I am so glad I clicked the link to read. This first chapter really captures your attention. It is raw and powerful. I look forward to reading the rest.

Tod Schneider wrote 668 days ago

This is a very moving story, well told. Your writing style is smooth, and of course the story is quite emotional and compelling. So sorry you had to go through the loss of a child -- I can't imagine anything more devastating.
Best of luck with this.
Tod
http://authonomy.com/books/40646/the-lost-wink/

rastafolux wrote 715 days ago

Thanks for your kind thoughts they are greatly appreciated. MIke

How utterly heartbreaking. I have to say like all the others I am sorry for your loss and I imagine the pain never goes away. My friend lost her little boy at 8 years old and I will never forget the sound of her wails as she walked behind the coffin in the church. I believe in everything you said with regards to the coincidences: I have experienced this myself, and I guess some people are more intuitive than others. I am guessing that you are a deeply sensitive man, and that's why you pick up on the subtleties that others don't. This area of life has always been of great interest to me having had an experience when I thought of my granddad (who I hadn't seen for 4 years after he fell out with the family & I was a young girl, just out of college when I last saw him, so obviously was getting on with my own life, as youngsters do!) and then receiving a call about an hour later saying he'd died. Wow, your book brings me to tears. So moved.
KC

writerchick11 wrote 715 days ago

How utterly heartbreaking. I have to say like all the others I am sorry for your loss and I imagine the pain never goes away. My friend lost her little boy at 8 years old and I will never forget the sound of her wails as she walked behind the coffin in the church. I believe in everything you said with regards to the coincidences: I have experienced this myself, and I guess some people are more intuitive than others. I am guessing that you are a deeply sensitive man, and that's why you pick up on the subtleties that others don't. This area of life has always been of great interest to me having had an experience when I thought of my granddad (who I hadn't seen for 4 years after he fell out with the family & I was a young girl, just out of college when I last saw him, so obviously was getting on with my own life, as youngsters do!) and then receiving a call about an hour later saying he'd died. Wow, your book brings me to tears. So moved.
KC

rastafolux wrote 721 days ago

Thank you so much.

An extraordinary account, written in such a sensitive and sensible way, using words and expressions which few of us could hope to find.

Philip John

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