Book Jacket

 

rank  Editors Pick
word count 22916
date submitted 20.02.2011
date updated 30.11.2012
genres: Fiction, Science Fiction, Popular S...
classification: moderate
incomplete

Schrödinger's Caterpillar

Zane Stumpo

Help! My book’s been hijacked by a deranged narrator! He’s turned an exploration of parallel universes into a total farce. Now I look completely ridiculous.

 

Graham Paint is a downsizing consultant, and sick of it. One morning he misses his bus when he stops to put a strange caterpillar in a matchbox. As the bus passes he’s shocked to spot himself inside. Like Schrödinger’s Cat in the famous quantum thought experiment, the caterpillar's spawned parallel possibilities.  This comic novel explores Graham’s search for a better life among the various overlapping alternatives.

Another clone, Grim Dupeint, is a loathsome international arms dealer. Graham infiltrates Grim’s corporation, then embezzles cash for charity. When a furious Grim realises, Graham must act fast. And right now he's acting like fish food.

Graham launches upon a new lifestyle (and sex life) as he dons the designer suits of power. But sinister figures soon see through Graham’s clothing.

Now Graham’s under attack from the corporation, the police, his ex-wife’s private detective, and an infuriatingly pompous water-colourist who Graham might have been if he’d gone to art college rather than business school. To survive (and steal the artist’s wonderful woman) Graham needs to find hidden resources. 

By definition Dopplegraham’s equally resourceful. 

Bugger...

Schrödinger's Caterpillar - a stupid book for brainy people!

 
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tags

alter ego, alternative reality, alternative universe, bonkers, bonking, cat, caterpillar, comedy, comic, consultant, daft, destiny, disguise, doppelga...

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HarperCollins Wrote

Review of Schrodinger’s Caterpillar

Broad Summary:
This whimsical, humorous tale explores quantum physics through protagonist Graham Paint, and a caterpillar he finds that is capable of spawning new universes. The story follows Graham and the various other selves that he spawns (Dopplegrahams). There are also dopplecaterpillars. All sorts of adventures ensue, from temporarily moving into the life of his rich, psychopathic counterpart Grim, to being seduced by the wife of one of the selves which exist in different universes. Graham remains an ordinary guy, a bumbling idiot, throughout.

This is a sprawling novel, which proceeds without clear sense of direction. It combines elements of ‘The Office’ (humorous colleagues, unlikely companies, and the monotony of the workplace); with magical realism which borders on sci-fi (Douglas Adams would seem an obvious comparison).

In terms of market placement, there is perhaps scope for it beside Jasper Fforde, although it is a one-off, rather than a series. It certainly fits in ‘adult light humour’.

Weaknesses
There are too many jokes in this novel. The art of comedy is as much about knowing how to pace things as it is about being funny. Every page of this novel has several witty asides on it. Whilst these are often funny, there are far too many, and they interfere with the pace of the novel to the extent that it is difficult to sustain interest in the overarching narrative.

The narrative is extremely bitty. Paragraphs and chapters vary wildly in length and, whilst this is for deliberate effect, the result is that it is difficult to maintain both narrative cohesion and the reader’s interest. Larger sections of unbroken text would be helpful.

Additionally, humour is used in place of the following: character development, emotional engagement, pacing and plot. When writing a humorous novel, you cannot entirely discard novel convention. Both Jasper Fforde and Douglas Adams create novels which function well in terms of coherent plot, fascinating character, compelling pace and description, and the jokes are a wonderful addition, but they are not the overwhelming feature. To effectively innovate, it helps to retain the pertinent aspects of tradition.

Another difficulty is the unsympathetic characters, whilst Pate, the quantum physics geek, is rather sweet, the rest of the cast, and particularly Graham, are fairly unsympathetic. Graham is a loser, who works in a job he doesn’t like, has a girlfriend he doesn’t like, and has very little imagination. This is fine, but he does not alter throughout the novel - he watches his doppelganger get arrested with very little emotion, sleeps with the wife of another Graham, and whilst his dopplegangers do profile how awful he is in other lives (Grim is a good example), Graham is not nice enough to be an everyman who wins out.

The novel is also far too long. The entire madcap adventure lacks a heart, a single transformative moment or climactic event. It would be brilliant to have more plot - I know a lot of things happen, but to me plot is also a single cohesive process, an arc which is neatly followed. The story ends rather abruptly, and without resolution, I would like to see it made neater.

Strengths
This could be a very funny, rather sweet story. It needs comprehensive editing, with large cuts. The concept is good for a short novel, or as one of a series of short stories within one ‘universe’ but at this current point it isn’t a whole novel.

Graham needs a rethink – his flaws need to be sympathetic, he needs space for redemption.

The concept is wonderful - very original - but it needs to be tightened and made streamlined. Decide what the focus is - Graham finally growing up? Finding true love? Leaving his life for a better one? You need thematic cohesion to make this a powerful novel.

Allow yourself to keep one joke in every three. Write according to the conventions of a good novel - they exist for a reason - and invest more in making the characters funnier, and the narrative voice less obvious. Readers tire of a smart-alec narrator long before they tire of funny characters.

Decision
Currently, this is not for us. However, the core concept is great. I think you may have something with a bit of editing, so don’t give up.

ExpatMaddie wrote 426 days ago

Re: Harper Collins Wrote:

Together with many other readers, I am at a loss in trying to understand why the above review is totally at odds with Authonomy's very favorable assessment of Schrodinger's Caterpillar, when it was recently selected as Wednesday's One to Watch. The disappointing review above is patronizing, riddled with obvious factual errors about the characters and plot, and padded out with irrelevant boilerplate advice, which appears to have been added because the reviewer hadn't read or understood the text well enough to justify the untrue and sweeping generalizations made. I suspect that the reviewer was motivated to damn this work with faint praise. Isn't it about time authonomy decided to pick up something good it genuinely discovered on this site? This reviewer should first have become sufficiently educated about the Many Worlds Interpretation of quantum physics to know why the suggestions made in the review (about "the overarching narrative of the novel") are far too simplistic to be considered credible by the targeted readership. There is a reason why Zane Stumpo tagged his work as being "for brainy people."

I refute the reviewer's claims that the main character "does not alter throughout the novel" and the other characters "are unsympathetic." This is untrue. Certainly, when we first meet him, Graham Paint is robotically going through the motions of living his boring, unfulfilling life. This steadily improves, however, after his seemingly unimportant decision to put the strange caterpillar in a matchbox becomes the catalyst for a quantum leap in his level of awareness - and an incomplete separation of the multiverse. Following this quantum event, Graham quickly realizes that he is unhappy and disatisfied because he is not being his authentic self or living up to his full potential: A major theme, dealing with fear of being a failure, which resonates with many readers. After his early encounters with Doppelgraham, 'our' Graham seeks out some of the other versions of himself (now residing in our historical Universe, which is only one alternative reality within the eternal, timeless entity termed the multiverse), with a view to finding out how to be more successful. Newly aware, Graham starts to live his life with intention. It makes no sense when the reviewer declares there is "no single transformative moment," because several are necessary and apparent as Graham develops a much needed emotional IQ on the way to a better life. There is also a very clear sense of direction and Graham does not "remain ..a bumbling idiot throughout." In the hilarious Chapter 14 ( my favorite) we are treated to Graham's glorious epiphany that his marriage to Kerri is as dead as both his career in EditSolutions ( a composite of mendacious consulting businesses today, and a clever vehicle for satire) ) and the shrivelled houseplants he ejects from his kitchen after reading the inadvertently honest letter from his wife's divorce lawyer. One questions how diligently this reviewer read all the text based upon divorce before so confidently, yet wrongly, stating that Kerri is Graham's girlfriend. Accuracy in a review is a mark of basic respect for writers. It matters greatly to those who have been rewarded with a review for the years of hard work and effort required to reach the ED.

How can this reviewer seriously contend that "the whole madcap adventure lacks a heart, a single transformative moment or climactic event," when we readers all know that the plot requires emotionally stunted Graham to change enough to become blissfully reunited with his forsaken first love? And she doesn't "seduce" main character "Graham" (from her own viewpoint) because she knows of only the version of him who became Hammy. In Emma's experience, and in his own, Graham has seamlessly become Hammy and, as such, goes forward to enjoy a happy, fulfilling marriage and family life. That is, until the clever dual climax, which presents us with both a happy ending and a distraught family with a problem to be solved in a sequel. Resolution and "redemption" are covered!

Clearly, this reviewer lacked motivation to bother understanding "the character development, emotional engagement, pacing and plot." We readers experienced no such limitations. A reviewer is entitled to a personal and professional opinion; but not at the expense of truth, accuracy, and the fairness to read and understand the book before writing a review for a worldwide forum where potential publishers and readers can use it to decide whether to purchase a writer's work - or not!

There is an obvious explanation for why "the story ends abruptly'. It's the same reason that there is an Alternative Epilogue. It's because at least two different endings are essential - as befits a sophisticated plot predicated on a quantum event causing an overlapping of universes in the multiverse. Unlike the reviewer, we readers have no doubt at all that this is science fiction! The reviewer, disingenuously claiming to applaud the "originality" of Schrodinger's Caterpillar, fails to appreciate the importance of the part played by the humor and experimental nature of the narration. Frankly, I don't see why this book being laugh-out-loud funny is considered to be a problem. It's intended to be a farce and a comedy! And, I enjoyed making literary comparisons between the author's work and that of Lewis Carroll, Laurence Sterne, Gogol and, most obviously, the late, great Douglas Adams. The reviewer is annoyingly dismissive of the author's innovation and tells him to "retain the pertinent aspects of tradition." I suggest that the reviewer looks up the meaning of the word "innovate." Following the pedestrian suggestions given would require the author to dumb-down the exploration of aspects of Graham's personality ( as evidenced in the behavior of his clones) by making him "funnier ", and less complex (interesting); removing most of the jokes and narration, and making everything "neater." Neither the plot nor Graham is intended to be "sweet." What a patronizing word that is! The suggested butchery would gut the book of its entire purpose which is, of course, to explore Graham's chance to learn from some of the other paths his version of himself could have gone down had he made better choices. I would hate to see this wonderful doppelganger- literature, coming as they say from "beneath Gogol's Overcoat," pointlessly eviscerated in the dull ways suggested. The reviewer is mistaken in labeling this original, brilliant, hilarious, erudite and thought-provoking novel as "adult light humor." It is far, far more.

Literate readers enjoy originality and coloring outside the lines. We enjoyed the clever narration, the erudition (and in particular the punning) and the intellectual challenge of working out the identity of the narrator/s. In fact, we enjoyed the entire book. I own a handsome paperback copy of Schrodinger's Caterpillar. I can only express great relief that the author of this marvellous product didn't wait until this review was delivered before deciding to publish it his way. It most definately isn't "too long" and all of the ten readers I supplied with paperback copies last Christmas are eagerly awaiting the sequel.

I buy lots of books ( several hundred this year) so I feel obliged to give my point of view as both a reader and a customer. Frankly, readers "tire" more of lazy, patronizing reviewers - who clearly only skimmed through a book to churn out a skimpy, unsatifactory review in order as Pope puts it so well - "to damn with faint praise." We also detest increasingly being infantilized with dumbed-down pap in place of thought-provoking literature. There is a reason this book is outselling the books published by Authonomy.










Maevesleibhin wrote 818 days ago

ComLit review

S's caterpillar' 1-11
Zane,
I have been wanting to read this book since I saw its cover on someone else's bookshelf, and I am really happy to have finally done so. This is really fantastic comic writing; witty and entertaining, yet light and interesting. A good, compelling plot and endearing characters (even though they are endearing for being dolts!) It made me laugh out loud on several occasions, and the chuckle while remembering it. What is more, and perhaps the highest commendation I can give to a comedy book, I thought about it to forget about my worries as I was dozing off to sleep.  I am highly enjoying this. I give it six stars, put it on my shelf and give it six happy faces.
:) :) :) :) :) :)
Maeve
Mrs Maginnes is Dead

Nick Goulding wrote 1086 days ago

A great book. A wickedly humorous dismantling of the insanity of our times. I like your distinctive sense of fun - elements of the surreal worlds of Douglas Adams and David Nobbs and just as amusing. Plenty of ‘I know what you mean!’ moments; the subtle and personal observations that mark out comedic writers that get under your skin. You keep the reader engaged and challenged. Well written but minor typo – ch7 line 6, ‘and she and falls in a faint’. Some of the detail may not cross the pond too well but that is a risk we all face. Both ways.

You handle the profound issues lightly but well and make the obscure accessible, without lecturing. I like the ‘meta’ levels where you step out of the book and address the reader – risky but somehow it works.

Overall, a very entertaining book which I feel deserves to reach the Editor’s Desk and, if this is one of the fairer universes, onwards and upwards.

Nick G (‘Where She Lies’)

Clive Eaton wrote 1100 days ago

This just has to be the funniest book I've read in a long time . . . and I've read some seriously funny books. Every chapter is just overflowing with great humour. I backed it a few days ago after reading the pitch, but I've now also given it 6 stars. Simply brilliant.

Clive
The Pyramid Legacy

amadeusbach wrote 1107 days ago

This is excellent. 'Both Chapter 5s'. I hereby declare that all books should have two chapter 5s! Consider yourself backed. If this doesn't get published, the rest of us have no hope...

ExpatMaddie wrote 426 days ago

Re: Harper Collins Wrote:

Together with many other readers, I am at a loss in trying to understand why the above review is totally at odds with Authonomy's very favorable assessment of Schrodinger's Caterpillar, when it was recently selected as Wednesday's One to Watch. The disappointing review above is patronizing, riddled with obvious factual errors about the characters and plot, and padded out with irrelevant boilerplate advice, which appears to have been added because the reviewer hadn't read or understood the text well enough to justify the untrue and sweeping generalizations made. I suspect that the reviewer was motivated to damn this work with faint praise. Isn't it about time authonomy decided to pick up something good it genuinely discovered on this site? This reviewer should first have become sufficiently educated about the Many Worlds Interpretation of quantum physics to know why the suggestions made in the review (about "the overarching narrative of the novel") are far too simplistic to be considered credible by the targeted readership. There is a reason why Zane Stumpo tagged his work as being "for brainy people."

I refute the reviewer's claims that the main character "does not alter throughout the novel" and the other characters "are unsympathetic." This is untrue. Certainly, when we first meet him, Graham Paint is robotically going through the motions of living his boring, unfulfilling life. This steadily improves, however, after his seemingly unimportant decision to put the strange caterpillar in a matchbox becomes the catalyst for a quantum leap in his level of awareness - and an incomplete separation of the multiverse. Following this quantum event, Graham quickly realizes that he is unhappy and disatisfied because he is not being his authentic self or living up to his full potential: A major theme, dealing with fear of being a failure, which resonates with many readers. After his early encounters with Doppelgraham, 'our' Graham seeks out some of the other versions of himself (now residing in our historical Universe, which is only one alternative reality within the eternal, timeless entity termed the multiverse), with a view to finding out how to be more successful. Newly aware, Graham starts to live his life with intention. It makes no sense when the reviewer declares there is "no single transformative moment," because several are necessary and apparent as Graham develops a much needed emotional IQ on the way to a better life. There is also a very clear sense of direction and Graham does not "remain ..a bumbling idiot throughout." In the hilarious Chapter 14 ( my favorite) we are treated to Graham's glorious epiphany that his marriage to Kerri is as dead as both his career in EditSolutions ( a composite of mendacious consulting businesses today, and a clever vehicle for satire) ) and the shrivelled houseplants he ejects from his kitchen after reading the inadvertently honest letter from his wife's divorce lawyer. One questions how diligently this reviewer read all the text based upon divorce before so confidently, yet wrongly, stating that Kerri is Graham's girlfriend. Accuracy in a review is a mark of basic respect for writers. It matters greatly to those who have been rewarded with a review for the years of hard work and effort required to reach the ED.

How can this reviewer seriously contend that "the whole madcap adventure lacks a heart, a single transformative moment or climactic event," when we readers all know that the plot requires emotionally stunted Graham to change enough to become blissfully reunited with his forsaken first love? And she doesn't "seduce" main character "Graham" (from her own viewpoint) because she knows of only the version of him who became Hammy. In Emma's experience, and in his own, Graham has seamlessly become Hammy and, as such, goes forward to enjoy a happy, fulfilling marriage and family life. That is, until the clever dual climax, which presents us with both a happy ending and a distraught family with a problem to be solved in a sequel. Resolution and "redemption" are covered!

Clearly, this reviewer lacked motivation to bother understanding "the character development, emotional engagement, pacing and plot." We readers experienced no such limitations. A reviewer is entitled to a personal and professional opinion; but not at the expense of truth, accuracy, and the fairness to read and understand the book before writing a review for a worldwide forum where potential publishers and readers can use it to decide whether to purchase a writer's work - or not!

There is an obvious explanation for why "the story ends abruptly'. It's the same reason that there is an Alternative Epilogue. It's because at least two different endings are essential - as befits a sophisticated plot predicated on a quantum event causing an overlapping of universes in the multiverse. Unlike the reviewer, we readers have no doubt at all that this is science fiction! The reviewer, disingenuously claiming to applaud the "originality" of Schrodinger's Caterpillar, fails to appreciate the importance of the part played by the humor and experimental nature of the narration. Frankly, I don't see why this book being laugh-out-loud funny is considered to be a problem. It's intended to be a farce and a comedy! And, I enjoyed making literary comparisons between the author's work and that of Lewis Carroll, Laurence Sterne, Gogol and, most obviously, the late, great Douglas Adams. The reviewer is annoyingly dismissive of the author's innovation and tells him to "retain the pertinent aspects of tradition." I suggest that the reviewer looks up the meaning of the word "innovate." Following the pedestrian suggestions given would require the author to dumb-down the exploration of aspects of Graham's personality ( as evidenced in the behavior of his clones) by making him "funnier ", and less complex (interesting); removing most of the jokes and narration, and making everything "neater." Neither the plot nor Graham is intended to be "sweet." What a patronizing word that is! The suggested butchery would gut the book of its entire purpose which is, of course, to explore Graham's chance to learn from some of the other paths his version of himself could have gone down had he made better choices. I would hate to see this wonderful doppelganger- literature, coming as they say from "beneath Gogol's Overcoat," pointlessly eviscerated in the dull ways suggested. The reviewer is mistaken in labeling this original, brilliant, hilarious, erudite and thought-provoking novel as "adult light humor." It is far, far more.

Literate readers enjoy originality and coloring outside the lines. We enjoyed the clever narration, the erudition (and in particular the punning) and the intellectual challenge of working out the identity of the narrator/s. In fact, we enjoyed the entire book. I own a handsome paperback copy of Schrodinger's Caterpillar. I can only express great relief that the author of this marvellous product didn't wait until this review was delivered before deciding to publish it his way. It most definately isn't "too long" and all of the ten readers I supplied with paperback copies last Christmas are eagerly awaiting the sequel.

I buy lots of books ( several hundred this year) so I feel obliged to give my point of view as both a reader and a customer. Frankly, readers "tire" more of lazy, patronizing reviewers - who clearly only skimmed through a book to churn out a skimpy, unsatifactory review in order as Pope puts it so well - "to damn with faint praise." We also detest increasingly being infantilized with dumbed-down pap in place of thought-provoking literature. There is a reason this book is outselling the books published by Authonomy.










fictionguy8 wrote 459 days ago

God knows we need moere humor in our lives and thankfully, thisbook provides just that. I liked the whole premise and the tongue in cheek style of writing. High stars,

fictionguy8 wrote 459 days ago

God knows we need moere humor in our lives and thankfully, thisbook provides just that. I liked the whole premise and the tongue in cheek style of writing. High stars,

Seringapatam wrote 480 days ago

Very witty and a popular prose. I will always love this type of humour. Superb book and would love to see this published. Well done.
Sean Connolly British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R)

Rosesprite wrote 508 days ago

This is simply brilliant. I want to see it published so I can buy it and re-read it whenever I want side-splitting humour. I love it.

PEL wrote 510 days ago

I think this is a sharp witty novel. It is quite visual in style and the funny quirks make for an entertaining read. Your in the top five and I can easily see why. Congratulations.

Kathryn Ferrier wrote 510 days ago

Such an intimate view into a lackluster morning turned vibrantly brilliant. I loved it! And yes, drawing out a cuss word is so liberating. I'm backing the book, not on the merit of bad words, but on a brilliant work by a mastermind, or would that be a madman? Nonetheless, your creativity is over-the-top wonderful.
Kathi - Taylor Made and The Enigma

dbprdctns wrote 513 days ago

Hilarious, well worth the read! Love your word play and the abstract nature of both the story and the characters. Very Douglas Adams!

C. G. Spaulding

Beta wrote 514 days ago

Zane, I read chapter 1 of your book and it is tongue in cheek stuff. What I read was enjoyable and there was no need to adopt an editorial approach. I read for enjoyment and glossed over any typos or mistakes.s. If there were any I'm sure an in-house editor of a publishing company will sort them out. I'm curious. And that is exactly as it should be in chapter 1.All page turning words and that's good. I'm new to this site and this is my first read. I wish you plenty of luck with your story. Well done.

Hoppo wrote 520 days ago

Absolutely loved this book,

It is really witty, comedic and entertaining. I really like Graham and his quirkiness.

This really does deserve being on the editor's desk.

candleman10 wrote 521 days ago

very funny clever book, laugh is not the word

Bobby Boy Ewing wrote 523 days ago

Very enjoyable, funny, you get a thumbs up from me.

Blue Bolt wrote 524 days ago

This is a clever and very funny book. It's fluently written, anarchic and off-beat, with oodles of wit and a fair amount of slapstick (always hard to pull off on the page, but done well here). A deliriously silly exploration of ideas. I can see why it is so highly rated.

NikkiNM wrote 525 days ago

Wow. I wish I understood more about Schrodinger as that might help me understand the brilliantly-written, puzzling chapter I have just read. No, this is not a bad puzzling. It's the kind of puzzling that makes you want to continue reading in the hopes that the story will give you answers your brain is so eagerly searching for. Of course, it's likely understanding Schrodinger won't do a damn thing to help me understand your book.

I really enjoyed the first chapter, and I look forward to reading more. You've earned a place on my bookshelf. :)

eleanorcocolarbi wrote 526 days ago

this will be a nice refreshing change for the peeps at the editorz desk, dey should share the reading between a fiction and a science editor so we can trust the authority of the review, ok, my humble tip to the capi!

bizarre, bonkaz, one-of-a-kind, unlike anything i've ever read before, difficult to write a comment on the caterpillar because it's from another dimension and goes by its own rulez and stikz two fingaz up at convention. well it takes convention, eats it and explodes it out across this and parallel universes in a thousand particles which come together as one great crazed organism which chomps through the quantum wasteland like a caterpillar chomping up a leaf, breaking it down with stomak acid then regurgitating it and making it easier for all of us to digest.
brilliant, funny, unique, GO ZUMPO!

Frankool wrote 527 days ago

Hello, Zane,
Perhaps a Y on the end of your name instead of an E would be appropriate. I like your sense of humour and the way you internalise your character. The story is mad, fun and very witty. I've only managed the first chapter so far, but will grab a few more later in the week.
Great stuff!

Frank Riley
(Frankool)

Phoenix*Rising wrote 528 days ago

Very very very very funny. Unusual language that took some getting used to but once I did - very funny!

Laurence Howard wrote 528 days ago

I backed your book many moons ago. It has deservedly reached the dizzy heights of the eds desk and will go on to be published. Talent such as yours will always rise to the surface as sure as cream on milk.
Good luck.
Laurence Howard
The Cross of Goa

Tornbridge wrote 530 days ago

I have read and commented on this before but realised I missed rating it - sorry Zane.
5 nice big stars from me and I still love the fact that Graham is a downsizing constant.
****Go watch the video everyone**** great stuff.
Tornbridge
The Washington Adventure

Di Manzara wrote 530 days ago

Wow!

Congratulations for making it to the top 5 this month! :)

D

Zenwriter wrote 531 days ago

I'm three chapters in and all I can say is wow! Very reminiscent of Douglas Adams. I'm enjoying this immensely and will try to read more this evening. Excellent job!

David Andrew McGlone wrote 532 days ago

Zane

I like your style, your humour and your book. Excellent.

Zane Stumpo wrote 533 days ago

Very nicely written. I had minor issues with the flow of the narration in some parts, however, it is very fun and quirky... an entertaining read overall. The fact that you have incorporated interesting plots and twists with a comic touch works very well. As a reader, I can see your personality through the writing. So there is a piece of you in the book. Great job!!



I'll have to thank you here cos I can't send messages to you. So thanks! Z

SadieJBlue wrote 533 days ago

Outrageously hilarious! This was like reading a comedy movie before my eyes – better then Friday night entertainment on the telly. I’m probably at the younger scale of authors on authonomy, and probably at the younger scale of your target audience; but even I cracked a smile and a giggle throughout the first few chapters. The plot line is completely barmy and yet written to make absolute sense. I don’t know how you do it but let’s hope that this gets onto bookshelves in bookshops because this is the perfect birthday present for my dad!

Sadie, x

Serafina Violet wrote 533 days ago

Very nicely written. I had minor issues with the flow of the narration in some parts, however, it is very fun and quirky... an entertaining read overall. The fact that you have incorporated interesting plots and twists with a comic touch works very well. As a reader, I can see your personality through the writing. So there is a piece of you in the book. Great job!!

Helen Laycock wrote 533 days ago

P.S. High stars, even though I've read just a smidge.

Helen Laycock wrote 533 days ago

Zane, I have just dipped into the first chapter and just wanted to say how well-written and amusing Schrodinger's Caterpillar is.

I love your wit and turn of phrase. The 'sweary' bits are so funny - used to great humorous advantage here, and not in the least bit offensive as they can be in some fiction. I love the mathematical calculations too. I don't care how the story will unfold. I would read this purely because I love how you write. It is on my watchlist until I have room on my very small shelf.

And, by the way - now I know exactly what to call that eruption of coffee from the spout of the cafetiere - a 'sploot'. Marvellous!!

Helen

PauloB wrote 533 days ago

Very imaginative ! An up-to-our-days Wilt is on the loose in consultland ! :-) Best of luck

Peter J. Ford wrote 537 days ago

Wow Zane, this piece of work is fantastically clever. Not only is it smart, but it's been written tastefully enough not to be audacious or smarmy. I'm so impressed, and it made it a really enjoyable exercise to read. All the key points are there, plot, characterisation, tone, and a really compelling narrative voice. A truly enjoyable read, no surprise it's in the top five. No surprise whatsoever.
-Pete
Gum

Shelby Z. wrote 538 days ago

I like the new cover.
:)

Deborah Aldrich Farhi wrote 538 days ago

Okay, love, love love it!!! Do I have to critique? I'm really so awfully bad at it. I just like to read and enjoy! Going on shelf! I'll give more feedback too once I have read further!

Andrea Taylor wrote 538 days ago

Okay, job done. Had you not drawn my attention to it I would have missed it altogether and, of course, its brilliant. You are now seriously starred and on the bookshelf. I am nothing if not obedient (having been born before women's lib). You must be an Aquarian; no-one else has such a zany sense of humour. Your description of a caterpillar with a face on its bum was delightful.
I like the fact you are keeping an eye on my bookshelf because then I'm free to do other things.
Love the Viking helmet.
Andrea x

Cody Media Productions wrote 539 days ago

Loving the way you use language, it's definitely unique and while it takes a minute to get used to it, once you do it reads smooth as heck. I gotta be honest, I think I liked the old cover more. Maybe it just takes some getting used to.

Kirrily Whatman wrote 543 days ago

And finally, some room to shimmy across the other books on my shelf and give SC a spot. Good luck and congratulations on reaching well into the Top 10 so far, Zane.

Kirrily
(Having & Holding Ellanor)

K E Shaw wrote 544 days ago

I can't get past the first paragraph of chp 6 - tears of laughter are a bit of a bugger when you're trying to read. When I find a tissue, I will carry on (and try to make some half-way decent sort of comment). This so silly and so very clever, great fun.

Lady Chatterly wrote 545 days ago

Not my usual type of read, but very interesting nonetheless. You obviously have a natural writing talent and it's no surprise to see you so high up in the ranks. I can't really find anything "wrong" with this book or the writing, just not my cup of tea. I'll support it anyway though until you end up on the editor's desk!

Laura A. D. wrote 546 days ago

LOVE this! YOU ARE HILARIOUS! This month, buddy! I know it! :)

Liza85 wrote 546 days ago

Very, very funny book, and back on my shelf after a brief time off.

dichten wrote 547 days ago

This has me absolutely, deliriously, giddy with delight - and I've only just finished with chapter one! The writing is superb, the characters delightful and the plot is magnificent. This book grabbed me from the title alone, and I could not be more pleased with the work itself.

Thank you! Thank you, thank you!

C. E. Frizzell
Looking Forward to Joining You, Finally

c.carrig wrote 548 days ago

Having read the first two chapters I would suggest that this is not only entertaining but is a story that allows great visuals for the reader.

It's got the alternate reality, ' what if' part down and the somewhat carefree attitude of the narrator is entertaining. There are places where I feel word choice could be looked at as there are passages that are funny and could be punchier if the words used were changed or trimmed.

Very entertaining. I could see this being on screen.

Tornbridge wrote 549 days ago

Despite being an autonomy member and having seen the cover I actually got drawn to this by the youtube video animation which I stumbled on - talk about parallel universe coincidence!
For god sake just do the full animation it’s bloody brilliant! It’s on the watchlist until I have space for it on the shelf.
Kind Regards

Wes Harvin wrote 551 days ago

Excellent! Greatly enjoyable.

Wes
Shambell & Feaster, Zombie Attorneys

Tigershark wrote 551 days ago

Hey Zane, your so close, No 10. You need another push. 'The Lost Wink' seems to have done it. Come on rally the troops and get your novel up in the top five. Regards Lawrence.

Haraburda wrote 551 days ago

An excellent book. I believe you had way TOO much fun writing this book. Either that or you have multiple personalities. I enjoyed reading the subtle and non-subtle intellectual (or brainy) additions. And the deja vu of reading things over and over again had me wondering what was going on. Also, I had to endure the managerial decision-making and selection of options. I ended up reading all of them, and was starting to think of additional ones. Maybe, I was having way TOO much fun reading this book.

Good luck. Look forward to seeing this in print, and even hearing it in audio someday soon. A definite for the Editor's Desk.

Scott
Christian Controversies: Seeking the Truth

Haraburda wrote 551 days ago

An excellent book. I believe you had way TOO much fun writing this book. Either that or you have multiple personalities. I enjoyed reading the subtle and non-subtle intellectual (or brainy) additions. And the deja vu of reading things over and over again had me wondering what was going on. Also, I had to endure the managerial decision-making and selection of options. I ended up reading all of them, and was starting to think of additional ones. Maybe, I was having way TOO much fun reading this book.

Good luck. Look forward to seeing this in print, and even hearing it in audio someday soon. A definite for the Editor's Desk.

Scott
Christian Controversies: Seeking the Truth

Frank Upjohn wrote 552 days ago

With a space on my shelf what better book to back than a stupid book for brainy people. A brilliant concept.

Shnoowie wrote 555 days ago

SCHRÖDINGER'S CATERPILLAR by ZANE STUMP

The title of your book appealed to me and I did wonder if it would involve caterpillars and boxes! The synopsis made me think 'Eep, am I up to this?' but I jumped in anyway...

I found myself smiling as I read this and trying not to laugh, especially with the phrase "If natural selection can create creationists, then it can manage a caterpillar with a face on its arse."
The first chapter is fantastic, the comedy offsets Graham's constant analysis perfectly and some how makes it seem more 'acceptable'. I seem to have become quite attached to the little face-arse caterpillar too.

I will continue to read at my leisure; in the mean time I think you deserve top stars and a shelving!

Thom wrote 556 days ago

"Unless it’s a girl file, in which case it is placed in a dormitory and told that it’s not really very attractive and will probably never find another file to share a folder with."

I laughed out loud.

OTOH, I'd lose, "Hence my jocular nomenclature of Doppelgraham, as in Doppelganger - which is German for double goer. " If your reader isn't literate enough to be familiar with the term Doppelganger, he/she has no business reading Schroedinger's Caterpillar. Hell, The Cat in the Hat might be too advanced for him. Or her.

Having to explain a joke takes the funny out of it, n'est-ce pas?

Anyway, I just finished Chapter 4 - both of them - and I had to stop to comment: So far, so great.

Yeah, there're things I'd consider tightening up, but the basic stuff is all there, and the deadpan humor (yes, I'm a Yank) is as Great British as tea, crumpets, and soccer hooliganism.

More, please.

Regards,

Thom Stark

Thom wrote 556 days ago

"Unless it’s a girl file, in which case it is placed in a dormitory and told that it’s not really very attractive and will probably never find another file to share a folder with."

I laughed out loud.

OTOH, I'd lose, "Hence my jocular nomenclature of Doppelgraham, as in Doppelganger - which is German for double goer. " If your reader isn't literate enough to be familiar with the term Doppelganger, he/she has no business reading Schroedinger's Caterpillar. Hell, The Cat in the Hat might be too advanced for him. Or her.

Having to explain a joke takes the funny out of it, n'est-ce pas?

Anyway, I just finished Chapter 4 - both of them - and I had to stop to comment: So far, so great.

Yeah, there're things I'd consider tightening up, but the basic stuff is all there, and the deadpan humor (yes, I'm a Yank) is as Great British as tea, crumpets, and soccer hooliganism.

More, please.

Regards,

Thom Stark

Breanna Ardill wrote 557 days ago

I must be brainy! Fabulous book & great video too. On my shelf to the bitter end, :)