Book Jacket

 

rank 979
word count 109286
date submitted 17.05.2011
date updated 27.06.2013
genres: Thriller, Popular Culture
classification: universal
complete

The Sounds of Silence

Clive Radford

With the scientist’s sperm, can the human race survive in a post-holocaust grave new world on Maggie’s Farm?

 

Set in 1985. Jon and Carolyn Redford enjoy a carefree, fun-filled lifestyle in Kent County, with friends Gavin and Melanie Maynard.

While on holiday in Cornwall, the Redfords encounter a soothsayer who predicts a bleak future for mankind. The foursome then note some unexplained changes in the behaviour of wild animals and migrating birds, which seems to give credence to the prediction.

Then a terrorist outrage in South Africa leads to similar major atrocities in Israel and India. As détente fails, a global nuclear war becomes sparked off by an unforeseen source, leading to the superpowers exchanging H bomb punches like drunken boxers.

Two of the friends perish in the inferno of Holocaust night. Two are left to face the aftermath of a barren, sterile world. Soon it is down to one.


Chapters

1 Overture and Beginners
2 Prelude
3 Concurrence and Denial
4 Recognition
5 Conflict
6 Escalation
7 Subconscious Retreat
8 Holocaust
9 Aftermath
10 Grave New World
11 Familiar Face
12 Maggie’s Farm
13 Reclamation
14 South America Calling
15 The Scientist’s Sperm
16 Remembrance
17 Underture and Exit
18 Epilogue
19 Appendix 1: Nuclear Holocaust Causes




 
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tags

contemporary, intrigue, prophetic

on 13 watchlists

47 comments

 

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Frank Talaber wrote 102 days ago

Thanks for backing Seeds of Ascension, I'll be adding more soon. And I've put your book Sounds of Silence on my watchlist and will give it a read as well.
Frank

DMRogers wrote 240 days ago

Hi Clive,

I pushed myself through the first section desperately wanting to get to the dialogue I could see. I got a vague sense of what it is. Signals from aliens? I wondered if it was a poem and did a search but found no reference.

Once with the main characters it starts to flow well and I get intrigued as to where it is leading. I realise that I hadn't read your pitch. Went and read the pitch and now I know too much. Your pitch should entice the reader in rather than be a synopsis.

Overall, for me, other than the first part (which maybe more an indication of my lack of vocab), the writing style is good. It reads well and flows.

Regards
Dave

hair apparent wrote 436 days ago

I wasn't certain what the multimedia stuff was about (and I'm still not certain) and I admit I was hesitant to get involved with an experimental novel. However, I found it engaging and accessible and a very pleasant surprise. I like.

cbewellauthor wrote 445 days ago

Not bad, although it's a little long-winded for me. I do like the style although the dialogue is a bit strange. Then again I'm in my twenties so I don't know a lot about Cold war or Reagan era stuff. Keep it up.

TDonna wrote 650 days ago

This is a read that needs to be digested. The writing flows, the subject is meaty. I've only read through chapter 1, but the concept and your approach is intriguing. There is so much in here, and so much that is close to my heart as a former communist refugee, I need to take my time with your work. I'm applauding you writing this and I'll be back with more later.
Donna
No Kiss Good-bye

TDonna wrote 650 days ago

This is a read that needs to be digested. The writing flows, the subject is meaty. I've only read through chapter 1, but the concept and your approach is intriguing. There is so much in here, and so much that is close to my heart as a former communist refugee, I need to take my time with your work. I'm applauding you writing this and I'll be back with more later.
Donna
No Kiss Good-bye

Software wrote 695 days ago

Clive, i respect the ambition of your novel. I instantly had a problem with the opening of chapter 1, it all just felt a little too ethereal for me, a classic case of saying a lot, without really saying anything. It proved, if proof were needed, that you do know how to write however (i know this anyway having read and enjoyed another of your books) so i was glad to get into some dialogue. I was a bit disappointed by this too though, the dialogue felt a bit stilted and really didn't feel like an actual conversation between a real couple. And the bit were she talks about the proliferation of nuclear arms and gives what is clearly meant to be an insightful view of the situation, well that bit really fell flat for me, the intended insight really didnt materialise for me.
I didn't have a problem with the inserts, thelittle poetic bits, in fact i liked the idea, i just wondered about the different fonts and font sizes, it made it look a bit jumbled to me.
From this point on the chapter settled down into a solid rhythm, the only thing i would say now is that, for me, the chapter is far too long.
Sorry if i seem negative, but you can clearly take confort in that i'm very much in the minority and this seems to be a very popular book, it just wasn;t for me. For me, One Night in Tunisia was much stronger.




Hello Nathan,

Thanks for taking a look at The Sounds of Silence.

Regards,

Clive

Nathan O'Hagan wrote 696 days ago

Clive, i respect the ambition of your novel. I instantly had a problem with the opening of chapter 1, it all just felt a little too ethereal for me, a classic case of saying a lot, without really saying anything. It proved, if proof were needed, that you do know how to write however (i know this anyway having read and enjoyed another of your books) so i was glad to get into some dialogue. I was a bit disappointed by this too though, the dialogue felt a bit stilted and really didn't feel like an actual conversation between a real couple. And the bit were she talks about the proliferation of nuclear arms and gives what is clearly meant to be an insightful view of the situation, well that bit really fell flat for me, the intended insight really didnt materialise for me.
I didn't have a problem with the inserts, thelittle poetic bits, in fact i liked the idea, i just wondered about the different fonts and font sizes, it made it look a bit jumbled to me.
From this point on the chapter settled down into a solid rhythm, the only thing i would say now is that, for me, the chapter is far too long.
Sorry if i seem negative, but you can clearly take confort in that i'm very much in the minority and this seems to be a very popular book, it just wasn;t for me. For me, One Night in Tunisia was much stronger.

fatema wrote 725 days ago

Hi variety i call it, all inclusive, read one book and get all genre, poems, story telling, history,myth, politics, love and dialogues, interesting fomts too.

Software wrote 726 days ago

This is heady stuff, even as far as Literary-Fiction is concerned. The mixture of prose and poetry serves to strip away the veneer of myths planted by the demagogues of the 1980's, and in doing so, lay bare the false ideologies that have taken root from that fertile pile of bs left by our leaders.

Haven grown up in Ronald Reagan's America, and then watching as, Reagan, the man was transformed by the American right into this infallible demi-God, completely divorced from the actual man or his policies, I found this tale to be a refreshing window into a history that hadn't yet been shaped by the myth-makers and spinmasters. Much of this reads as if it is a death bed confession from one of these myth-makers, intent on stripping away the false ideologies that have sprung up in the wake of this age.

In the amidst of this, there is a very human story developing. My only concern I have for this novel is whether or not this story will be overwhelmed by the shear weight of the other material presented here. I found myself wanting to re-read much of the poetry and prose that weren't directly related to the central characters. For me, one read through was not sufficient to allow this material to sink in. The same cannot be said about the basic human storyline, which is presented in a much simpler manner.



Great analysis Jack,

Lot of insight in your comment, much appreciated.

Best regards,

Clive

Jack Cerro wrote 726 days ago

This is heady stuff, even as far as Literary-Fiction is concerned. The mixture of prose and poetry serves to strip away the veneer of myths planted by the demagogues of the 1980's, and in doing so, lay bare the false ideologies that have taken root from that fertile pile of bs left by our leaders.

Haven grown up in Ronald Reagan's America, and then watching as, Reagan, the man was transformed by the American right into this infallible demi-God, completely divorced from the actual man or his policies, I found this tale to be a refreshing window into a history that hadn't yet been shaped by the myth-makers and spinmasters. Much of this reads as if it is a death bed confession from one of these myth-makers, intent on stripping away the false ideologies that have sprung up in the wake of this age.

In the amidst of this, there is a very human story developing. My only concern I have for this novel is whether or not this story will be overwhelmed by the shear weight of the other material presented here. I found myself wanting to re-read much of the poetry and prose that weren't directly related to the central characters. For me, one read through was not sufficient to allow this material to sink in. The same cannot be said about the basic human storyline, which is presented in a much simpler manner.

Software wrote 762 days ago

SOUNDS OF SILENCE
This is an interesting story, both because of the characters you’ve created and the time period in which you’ve set this. There’s a lot of talk today about Reagan’s presidency and how Republicans wish he were back in office so you’ve chosen a god time period to write about. Carolyn is a wonderful character; spontaneous and fun. Putting in the interludes such as the one about Nietzsche is a clever way not only to introduce themes into your story but offer more food for thought. Highly starred and added to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?

Hello Jo,

Many thanks for your positive assessment, starring and backing of The Sounds of Silence. What I find most gratifying is that you have clearly engaged in the heart of the story, understood its theme and found the characters appealing. To be a good writer, you also need to be an intuitive reader. It very much looks like you have both, Jo.

All the best,

Clive

Wanttobeawriter wrote 763 days ago

SOUNDS OF SILENCE
This is an interesting story, both because of the characters you’ve created and the time period in which you’ve set this. There’s a lot of talk today about Reagan’s presidency and how Republicans wish he were back in office so you’ve chosen a god time period to write about. Carolyn is a wonderful character; spontaneous and fun. Putting in the interludes such as the one about Nietzsche is a clever way not only to introduce themes into your story but offer more food for thought. Highly starred and added to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?

Software wrote 776 days ago

I'm all for breaking new ground (no, I know I haven't myself) and for the concept of using different media to convey an overall picture. It would be a challenge to a film-maker to take this on but it could be a stunner. I am not a poet but enjoyed the poetic sections. I am not a scientist but very much liked the scientific ideas running through the plot. The dialogue is ok, good in parts. At the beginning of 3 it could do with breaking up with a bit of physical description.
Novelty factor = 10.
Backed
Lara
A RELATIVE LOSS



Dear Lara,

Many thanks for your positive assessment and for backing the novel. I really like the way you 'got it', that is the significance of the the different media and the poetry sections.

Very best wishes,

Clive

Lara wrote 776 days ago

I'm all for breaking new ground (no, I know I haven't myself) and for the concept of using different media to convey an overall picture. It would be a challenge to a film-maker to take this on but it could be a stunner. I am not a poet but enjoyed the poetic sections. I am not a scientist but very much liked the scientific ideas running through the plot. The dialogue is ok, good in parts. At the beginning of 3 it could do with breaking up with a bit of physical description.
Novelty factor = 10.
Backed
Lara
A RELATIVE LOSS

Software wrote 856 days ago

Unfortunately I don't have the time I believe this deserves.
But, I like it because it's challenging and different and that should be celebrated.
I'm putting this on my shelf in the hope that others will be as intrigued and interested as I was.

Good luck.
Diana
Pascual's Birthday



Hello Diana,

Thank you so much for your positive support. Hope you enjoy reading The Sounds of Silence.

All the best,

Clive

Diwrite wrote 860 days ago

Unfortunately I don't have the time I believe this deserves.
But, I like it because it's challenging and different and that should be celebrated.
I'm putting this on my shelf in the hope that others will be as intrigued and interested as I was.

Good luck.
Diana
Pascual's Birthday

Software wrote 865 days ago

I am completely fascinated by this work and I didn't expect to be. Your short pitch and long pitch are very well written. The combination of poetry and prose, narrative and dialogue, aliens and politics, sex and intrigue - AND you say music and images as well?? I don't think I've ever read a work quite like this and I think that your multimedia experiment is definitely the wave of the future. I wish I could think that way in my book...but I tend to write in silence in a cold dark room...heh...

Thank you for urging me to take a look at this,

- Rena (Bunderful) author of Master of the Miracles



Dear Rena,

Thank you for your positive review. It is most encouraging. Glad you found the work stimulating.

Very best wishes,

Clive

bunderful wrote 865 days ago

I am completely fascinated by this work and I didn't expect to be. Your short pitch and long pitch are very well written. The combination of poetry and prose, narrative and dialogue, aliens and politics, sex and intrigue - AND you say music and images as well?? I don't think I've ever read a work quite like this and I think that your multimedia experiment is definitely the wave of the future. I wish I could think that way in my book...but I tend to write in silence in a cold dark room...heh...

Thank you for urging me to take a look at this,

- Rena (Bunderful) author of Master of the Miracles

a.morrison712 wrote 893 days ago

I always feel a little out of sorts when reading Literary Fiction, as it is far from my usual genre of book. I'm afraid I may not be the best to offer a constructive crit on this work. All I can say is that this is nicely written(from what I saw in the first chapter), but I think you may attract more reads by cutting down the first chapter. I found that this brought more readers to my own work when I did this...just a thought. Good luck and five stars from me!

Best,

Ashley

Software wrote 894 days ago

Clive,

I just completed my read of the Prelude. What a powerful, well written, politically intense piece! I love the dialogue and when I read I can tell the intelligence that has gone into the work.
This is a book that stretches beyond anything I've read of the genre so far and I look forward to returning for more.


FYI: I loved the ending (Like my garden filter, it became deliberately invisible in the media noise which flooded the sensory receptors.) and I see that you have a soundtrack to accompany the book. What an intriguing idea!

Few writers would have the skill to approach this properly. You pull it off fantastically! I've rated the book 6 stars and have added it to my watchlist until room opens up on my shelf. Thanks for the enjoyable read! Have a wonderful day!

- Scott, The Ark of Humanity





Hi Scott,

Many thanks for your highly complementary appraisal. Glad you found the work stimulating. My writing bandwidth extends from the satirical to the somber with several poles in-between. Though TSOS is in main a somber message, a warning if you will, there are lighter moments of regular life, love and humour throughout the work, particularly between the characters which emerge in Part 1: Prelude.

Hope you get as much satisfaction from your next visit to see how the story enfolds and progressives.

Thank you for taking the time to read and assess my work.

All the best,

Clive

Scott Toney wrote 894 days ago

Clive,

I just completed my read of the Prelude. What a powerful, well written, politically intense piece! I love the dialogue and when I read I can tell the intelligence that has gone into the work.
This is a book that stretches beyond anything I've read of the genre so far and I look forward to returning for more.

FYI: I loved the ending (Like my garden filter, it became deliberately invisible in the media noise which flooded the sensory receptors.) and I see that you have a soundtrack to accompany the book. What an intriguing idea!

Few writers would have the skill to approach this properly. You pull it off fantastically! I've rated the book 6 stars and have added it to my watchlist until room opens up on my shelf. Thanks for the enjoyable read! Have a wonderful day!

- Scott, The Ark of Humanity

Software wrote 989 days ago

Clive,
The Sounds of Silence is a magnificent read. The Prelude is brilliantly written, and a feeling of impending doom enfolded me as i read it.
In spite of the political overtones, chapter one has an endearing quality, as we "watch" the interaction between Carolyn and her husband Clive.
"She responded with a rueful yet encouraging smile, ever the huntress; the provocative predator."
Excitingly effective narrative and dialogue, that promps the reader to turn the page. I've got to come back and read some more :)
Six well deserved stars and a place in line for the shelf.
Maria
Dark of the Moon





Hello Maria,

Many thanks for your encouraging words. I look forward to reading your next set of comments when you have read some more.

Best regards,

Clive

mrsdfwt wrote 989 days ago

Clive,
The Sounds of Silence is a magnificent read. The Prelude is brilliantly written, and a feeling of impending doom enfolded me as i read it.
In spite of the political overtones, chapter one has an endearing quality, as we "watch" the interaction between Carolyn and her husband Clive.
"She responded with a rueful yet encouraging smile, ever the huntress; the provocative predator."
Excitingly effective narrative and dialogue, that promps the reader to turn the page. I've got to come back and read some more :)
Six well deserved stars and a place in line for the shelf.
Maria
Dark of the Moon


Dwayne Kavanagh wrote 999 days ago

I read the first chapter and I was thrown a hundred yards! What cool concept and I can see this as a good ebook on an eReader with internet capability...the reader could pop back and forth. You've got an awesome imagination and thank God you know how to write...this out there...in a good way!

Cheers,
Dwayne

Dwayne Kavanagh wrote 999 days ago

I read the first chapter and I was thrown a hundred yards! What cool concept and I can see this as a good ebook on an eReader with internet capability...the reader could pop back and forth. You've got an awesome imagination and thank God you know how to write...this out there...in a good way!

Cheers,
Dwayne

CarolinaAl wrote 1017 days ago

I read your first chapter.

General comments: An interesting, informative start. A captivating main character. Thought-provoking narrative. Good descriptions. Not much tension in this chapter. Good pacing.

Specific comments on the first chapter:
1) 'His only emotion: fear' is telling. Consider showing his 'fear' so vividly the reader will experience it along with him. When you do this, the reader will be drawn deeper into your poetry,
2) 'The torturers rack.' Torturers (plural) should be torturer's (possessive. There are many more cases of using the plural form when the possessive for is appropriate.
3) ' ... and confident to Sinatra's rat pack but hardly fitted ... ' 'Confident' should be 'confidant.'
4) ' ... though thought off as reasonably minded people ... ' 'off' should be 'of.'
5) Hyphenate 'well known.'
6) I collasped the Observer and threw a caustic look at her, "give me a moment ... " Period after 'her' and capitalize 'give.' The only time a sentence preceding dialogue should be punctuated with a comma is if that sentence is a dialogue tag (tells who said something). This sentence is clearly not a dialogue tag and should be punctuated with a period. Consequently, the first word of dialogue should be capitalized. There are many more cases of this type of problem.
7) "I'm waiting darling." Comma after 'waiting.' When you address someone in dialogue, offset their name or title with a comma. There are many more cases where someone is addressed in dialogue and their name or title isn't offset with commas.
8) 'Portrait of a Young man as Vincent Van Gogh' Capitalize 'man.'
9) ' .. and Ohio basked in over 90 deg F, the water felt icy ... ' Spell out numbers 1-99. Also, spell out abbreviations.
10) Hyphenate 'twenty year old.'
11) "Randy old .. " Use an ellipsis ( ... ) for hesitant speech. Use an em-dash for interrupted speech. Since Clive cut interrupts Carolyn's dialogue, there should be an em-dash after 'old.'
12) "He give it his all but collapsed ... and died." 'Give' should be 'gave' to keep the sentence in past tense.
13) ' ... regularly demanding that the U. N brought severe economic sanctions into play ... ' Period after 'N.' There are more cases of this problem.
14) 'President P. W. Botha had multiple talks in Washington and London but always told be must start to dismantle Apartheid ... ' There seems to be words missing from this sentence.
15) Hyphenate 'self assessment.'
16) 'Class mates' is one word.
17) "My god that was enlightening." Capitalize 'god.'
18) 'Were humans beginning to see the tell tale signs of worse to come in South Africa.' Replace the period with a question mark.
19) ' ... it sounded so sinister, that is sent shivers up the spine; ... ' 'Is' should be 'it.'

I hope this critique will help you polish your all important first chapter. These are just my opinions. Use what works for you and discard the rest.

Thank you for supporting "Savannah Fire."

Have a fine day,

Al

monicque wrote 1020 days ago

I've already looked through this a few times, Clive, and I've come back again, because you asked for my comments... I found the concept interesting, the writing great and the story attractive, however, I don't like the idea of having to look at things on youtube while I'm reading. Actually, I don't like looking at things on youtube ever to tell you the truth!! But thanks for sharing, and I've rated you highly.
Monicque. x

Andi Brown wrote 1030 days ago

Hi Clive,

You asked me to take a look at your work in exchange for your looking at mine, and I have. I do have some comments; I hope you don't mind.

First, your pitch. It's not very clear what this book is about. You want to use the opportunity with the pitch to entice would-be readers, to sell your work. I think just giving a few broad strokes about the plot and the ideas in the book might make it more attractive than the level of detail you get into.

I found some of the dialogue a bit stilted, more like speechifying than actual conversation, especially talk one would expect between a couple. I think you can weave in the history and the politics more sublty. It reads more like a treatise than a novel. Maybe you could use some events or anecdotes to illustrate your points rather than sounding like a history lesson.

I also noticed some odd phrases, e.g. "her words punctuated with feminine guile." Do you know the writer's maxim "show, don't tell?" Instead of "telling" us about her feminine guile, why not show it? Somehting like "she tossed her hair and smiled." "High heeled legs?" "Eyes rolling around her?" Dito some unusual word choices - "confident" to Sinatra's rat pack. "Built a robust persona around me."

I think sometimes writers try to use unusual words to enliven the book. I usually think that a simpler word is better than one used incorrectly.

I think you have a lot you want to say with this book. And you want to say it with poetry, with facts, and with dialogue. I think you've set yourself a very ambitious goal. Weaving together a number of different writing styles within one work is tricky. If you're thoughtful and do some tweaking, you might just be able to pull it off. I do wish you a lot of luck with this special book., and I've starred it for you.

And now, your turn. I give you....Animal Cracker.

Best,
Andi

johnburns wrote 1037 days ago

A curious beast altogether. It takes an awfully long time to get going and before then the reader has acres of polemics and history to wade through. There really isn't any need for all the basic history lessons, which are often less than accurate. So Russians and Americans have not been topping each other for 50 years? The CIA certainly worked alongside the Taliban against the Soviets. The Russians think nothing of assassainating a defector in Britain. Where your yarn works best is in the simple scenes, such as the Ohio river test, or again when Old Bessie utters her doom-laden prophecy. These episodes - and there are too few - sparkle in the narrative. You have a rather cavalier attitude towards English. In place of confident, use confidant. You use verses when you mean versus, faint instead of feint. Elsewhere you are strangely imprecise for a poet. Caro has a 'magnificent' face. What does it look like? The world is 'slouching irreproachably' towards Armageddon. Well, that means we're all blameless. In the Observer piece you use 'will' five times in a brief para. A bit sloppy, even for the Observer. You use 'emphazize the point' twice in consecutive sentences. Overall, I found the tale too prolix to hold my attention and the poems didn't do anything for me. It is certainly original, but perhaps it would benefit from a more traditional approach to story-telling.

Software wrote 1042 days ago

With the work The Sounds of Silence, Clive Radford has become a pioneer of multimedia literature. In this dynamic text, video with audio links are interposed alongside poetry and prose. Dialogue is interspersed with didactic prose and an intriguing plot emerges. Internationally relevant allusions are made and this multidimensional text reflects multidimensional themes. Archetypical characters (such as Bessie the seer) also help to move the story along at a good pace. Simple and consistent repetition of format (media link, poetry, didatic prose, dialogue...) and actions (IE people looking skyward) emphasize the themes of religion and politics and grounds the work in a neo-minimalist style.



Hello Amy,

Many thanks for your erudite appraisal. Gratifying to know that you got it. Hope you read some more. It gest even better as the story unfolds.

Very best regards,

Clive

Amy Craig Beasley wrote 1042 days ago

With the work The Sounds of Silence, Clive Radford has become a pioneer of multimedia literature. In this dynamic text, video with audio links are interposed alongside poetry and prose. Dialogue is interspersed with didactic prose and an intriguing plot emerges. Internationally relevant allusions are made and this multidimensional text reflects multidimensional themes. Archetypical characters (such as Bessie the seer) also help to move the story along at a good pace. Simple and consistent repetition of format (media link, poetry, didatic prose, dialogue...) and actions (IE people looking skyward) emphasize the themes of religion and politics and grounds the work in a neo-minimalist style.

Gideon McLane wrote 1045 days ago

"The Sounds of Silence" - Clive Radford. I read the 1st chapter and scanned several comments. A unique concept - the multimedia novel. Stars for unique approach. Some thoughts: not sure multimedia is for most readers - whom or what is your target audience - cinema?; this site sometimes does strange things to formatted text - suggest to avoid distracting the reader and to really show you're technically on top of your media you might want to clean up the format problem with the opening poetry. Hope this helps.

Gideon ("Thrill Writer's Remorse")

Software wrote 1052 days ago

This is a very timely novel, something that I think would do well in these times. Deeply layered this feels like the kind of book you really have to settle in with and savor. Very original plot which goes a long way with me as a reader. I like something that doesn't feel like its been done before. Very interesting!

missy



Hello Missy,

Hope you are well and that the writing progresses.

Many thanks for your kind and encouraging comments.

All the best,

Clive

missyfleming_22 wrote 1052 days ago

This is a very timely novel, something that I think would do well in these times. Deeply layered this feels like the kind of book you really have to settle in with and savor. Very original plot which goes a long way with me as a reader. I like something that doesn't feel like its been done before. Very interesting!

missy

B A Morton wrote 1058 days ago

Clive what a brilliant concept, the truly multimedia novel. Perfect for the ebook market linking to music, newsreel, pictures...well...anything really. What a super way for the reader to really visualise and understand what you are trying to portray. I'm a total technophobe so haven't a clue about the complexities of this, but it's great new thinking. I do hope the people in the know spot this.
Best of luck
Babs

B A Morton wrote 1058 days ago

Clive what a brilliant concept, the truly multimedia novel. Perfect for the ebook market linking to music, newsreel, pictures...well...anything really. What a super way for the reader to really visualise and understand what you are trying to portray. I'm a total technophobe so haven't a clue about the complexities of this, but it's great new thinking. I do hope the people in the know spot this.
Best of luck
Babs

Tom Kendall wrote 1063 days ago

This is certainly original thinking. It is cleverly done. A good plot. My only downer is I wonder if it will work commercially. I mean how would it be marketed. It's probably way too advanced. One last point. Do you have permission to use all of the media material.

Amy Craig Beasley wrote 1063 days ago

The Sounds of Silence is on my watchlist - Clive, thanks again for your thoughts on The Women Who Fly Kites ~ a

Software wrote 1064 days ago

The idea of an interactive multimedia novel is well, novel! Great idea. Some of the formatting seems to be a bit off though? or that just my computer?? - I like stories with lots of different perspectives and ways of giving information to the reader and this does that in a really interesting way. 1st chapter is very long, but then thats good to hook you in! Enjoyed the read and will back!



Dear Stuart and Victor,

Many thanks for your encouraging review and for committing to back the book.

If you would like to see the first chapter replete with images and soundtrack and the text aligned as originally written, please advise and I will email to you.

Best regards,

Clive

Stuart & Victor wrote 1064 days ago

The idea of an interactive multimedia novel is well, novel! Great idea. Some of the formatting seems to be a bit off though? or that just my computer?? - I like stories with lots of different perspectives and ways of giving information to the reader and this does that in a really interesting way. 1st chapter is very long, but then thats good to hook you in! Enjoyed the read and will back!

Software wrote 1065 days ago

I like it! Very promising beginning and thesis. I will read more as soon as I can. I've been in and out of authonomy lately but hope I'll be back regularly now. Please take a look at The President's Wife is on Prozac. I'll leave your book on my shelf for awhile. All the best - Jayne



Hello Jayne,

Many thanks for your positive review. Much appreciated. I have commented and stared The President's Wife and Prozac.

Best regards,

Clive

Jayne Lind wrote 1065 days ago

I like it! Very promising beginning and thesis. I will read more as soon as I can. I've been in and out of authonomy lately but hope I'll be back regularly now. Please take a look at The President's Wife is on Prozac. I'll leave your book on my shelf for awhile. All the best - Jayne

Software wrote 1065 days ago

This is an ambitious undertaking, though it could be the sort of thing we'll be accustomed to in a decade or so. With pictures, bits of film, a soundtrack as well as the words, (most of that unavailable here, of course) it will be a multimedia experience. I commend you on your imagination and creativity.
The writing is good, your story involved. Nuclear annihilation stories were popular in the 70s, when it all seemed far too possible.
I wonder about copyright problems with the pictures, soundtrack and the pieces of film you have incorporated. It would be a nightmare getting all of those approved for use.

Dear Marj,

Many thanks for your encouragement and your backing.

All the best,

Clive
This must have been so much work. Well done and backed. Marj.

M. A. McRae. wrote 1065 days ago

This is an ambitious undertaking, though it could be the sort of thing we'll be accustomed to in a decade or so. With pictures, bits of film, a soundtrack as well as the words, (most of that unavailable here, of course) it will be a multimedia experience. I commend you on your imagination and creativity.
The writing is good, your story involved. Nuclear annihilation stories were popular in the 70s, when it all seemed far too possible.
I wonder about copyright problems with the pictures, soundtrack and the pieces of film you have incorporated. It would be a nightmare getting all of those approved for use.
This must have been so much work. Well done and backed. Marj.

Software wrote 1065 days ago

Clive,
The structure of this is impressive. And it was nice to be back in the '80s again. I enjoyed the interactions between Clive and Carolyn (although, it seemed quite a while before I caught his name, unless I just missed it earlier). When the uncle died with his boots on, you have what appears as a typo, "he give it his all." He gave it his all?
Though I find the structure brilliant, I'm wondering if it would not be more 'reader friendly', were you to break up this lengthy chapter into two or three. I've been advised to do that, as well, but I kept my long first chapter as it is, nonetheless. So there you have it.
An altogether great start to this book. 5 stars for now.
Cheers!
John B Campbell



Dear John,

Many thanks for your positive comments and your 5* rating. Much appreciated.

Very best regards,

Clive

Nigel Fields wrote 1065 days ago

Clive,
The structure of this is impressive. And it was nice to be back in the '80s again. I enjoyed the interactions between Clive and Carolyn (although, it seemed quite a while before I caught his name, unless I just missed it earlier). When the uncle died with his boots on, you have what appears as a typo, "he give it his all." He gave it his all?
Though I find the structure brilliant, I'm wondering if it would not be more 'reader friendly', were you to break up this lengthy chapter into two or three. I've been advised to do that, as well, but I kept my long first chapter as it is, nonetheless. So there you have it.
An altogether great start to this book. 5 stars for now.
Cheers!
John B Campbell

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