Book Jacket

 

rank 751
word count 12533
date submitted 23.05.2011
date updated 04.02.2014
genres: Thriller, Non-fiction, History, Cri...
classification: universal
incomplete

Last Tango for Che

Elina Castro Almeyra

Tati Landau loved a man whose fate was sealed. She joined a group slated for annihilation. When the axe fell, she tried to get out.

 

Thirty-eight years ago in Argentina, the struggle for democracy turned into a roaring tempest that left 10,000 victims at the hands of terrorist group, Montoneros, and 15,000 dead or disappeared at the hands of the State. Drawing from personal experience and from the death of a childhood friend, the Author focuses on an alienated teenager as she falls in love with a terrorist and joins his cell. First non-partisan work in English to present all sides of Argentina´s Dirty War, delves into the reasons why prosperous, educated young people became mass killers. Argues that the Dirty War was inevitable, and proposes Nunca Más Never Again as a way of life.

 
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tags

action, adolescents, adversity, alienation, betrayal, biography, college students, conflict, conspiracy, crime, history, life, love, military, murder,...

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94 comments

 

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JonD wrote 24 days ago

Elina, I have only read the first chapter so far. But you do have a way of making an enjoyable read, which also educates one about this episode in history; I suspect more effectively than most other means of study.
Also, your more descriptive paragraphs read to my mind as 'haflway between a book and a screenplay', which I think, has got to be good, in terms of gaining a larger audience. Which is what Last Tango deserves. Good job.
Jon
St Bartholomew's Man

Darius Stransky wrote 24 days ago

Last Tango for Che BY Elina Castro Almeyra

Elina please accept my apologies. I thought I'd read to the end of your posted chapters. BUT I HAD NOT!!

Chapter Five

Brilliantly executed (the writing not the victims)

The tension was palpable. Each second ticking away as innocents came and went and 'partisans' steeled themselves for the sabotage.

A race for a cross and and a whistling, humming dancing man.

Lovely insights that say as much in a quick word picture as a complete paragraph.

Impressed.

And, as ever, you leave your reader hanging on - He wants them alive yet methinks taht your operatives would not agree to that - I know I wouldn't!

Thanks for that

I may just read over some more again later

Best wishes

Mantente fuerte Elina

Darius
The King's Jew

Jim Darcy wrote 29 days ago

Strong story and remarkable tale. Brings it to life, ironically.

Kaychristina wrote 43 days ago

For mi amiga, Elina, a re-backing of this incredible story - so well-written it hurts. And the latest edits hurt even more! Salut!!

xx from Kay
(The Fortune of Annacara)

Darius Stransky wrote 68 days ago

Chapter 4

Vivid descriptions well told.
The change in Tati as she moves from 'playing' at revolution to understanding the full horrors of revolution is quite touching. That's the thing about conflict - if you don't go in hard and fast with conviction then the chances of coming out unscathed are virtually nil.
I'm wondering now whether Alberto will live so am saving next chapter for later.
Excellent
Viva la revolucion. Volvere
Darius

JonD wrote 24 days ago

Elina, I have only read the first chapter so far. But you do have a way of making an enjoyable read, which also educates one about this episode in history; I suspect more effectively than most other means of study.
Also, your more descriptive paragraphs read to my mind as 'haflway between a book and a screenplay', which I think, has got to be good, in terms of gaining a larger audience. Which is what Last Tango deserves. Good job.
Jon
St Bartholomew's Man

JonD wrote 24 days ago

Elina, I have only read the first chapter so far. But you do have a way of making an enjoyable read, which also educates one about this episode in history; I suspect more effectively than most other means of study.
Also, your more descriptive paragraphs read to my mind as 'haflway between a book and a screenplay', which I think, has got to be good, in terms of gaining a larger audience. Which is what Last Tango deserves. Good job.
Jon
St Bartholomew's Man

Darius Stransky wrote 24 days ago

Last Tango for Che BY Elina Castro Almeyra

Elina please accept my apologies. I thought I'd read to the end of your posted chapters. BUT I HAD NOT!!

Chapter Five

Brilliantly executed (the writing not the victims)

The tension was palpable. Each second ticking away as innocents came and went and 'partisans' steeled themselves for the sabotage.

A race for a cross and and a whistling, humming dancing man.

Lovely insights that say as much in a quick word picture as a complete paragraph.

Impressed.

And, as ever, you leave your reader hanging on - He wants them alive yet methinks taht your operatives would not agree to that - I know I wouldn't!

Thanks for that

I may just read over some more again later

Best wishes

Mantente fuerte Elina

Darius
The King's Jew

Jim Darcy wrote 29 days ago

Strong story and remarkable tale. Brings it to life, ironically.

Kaychristina wrote 43 days ago

For mi amiga, Elina, a re-backing of this incredible story - so well-written it hurts. And the latest edits hurt even more! Salut!!

xx from Kay
(The Fortune of Annacara)

Darius Stransky wrote 68 days ago

Chapter 4

Vivid descriptions well told.
The change in Tati as she moves from 'playing' at revolution to understanding the full horrors of revolution is quite touching. That's the thing about conflict - if you don't go in hard and fast with conviction then the chances of coming out unscathed are virtually nil.
I'm wondering now whether Alberto will live so am saving next chapter for later.
Excellent
Viva la revolucion. Volvere
Darius

Mellish wrote 68 days ago

Chap1

Remarkable life story! Thanks for the backing.

This chapter: it is very much a shorthand style, which I think almost works. One of the things that needs to happen, I suspect, is that the voices of the characters must sound very different to the shorthand narrator style. You will need to fill them with quirks to differentiate each character - from each other, as well as the narrator voice. Some description of the speakers might help this process.

The next thing is that a hell of a lot is happening, and you're not giving the reader many words, so those words are going to have to say a lot. This minimalist, each word will have to particularly poignant to satisfy the reader's need for detail. At the moment, they relate in very brief detail, rather than being poetic or particularly descriptive. So it is difficult for the reader to feel transported to your set.

However, I think there is a fascinating story to be told here!

quibbles:

shot in the neck? why neck - usually head, but as there is a risk in missing with a good head shot, the core of the body is next most favoured - heart.

catholic[, renowned for his] remarkable insight

Darius Stransky wrote 73 days ago

Last Tango for Che
Chapter 3

That was a bit of a shock! Foxtrot's demise!
"Her screams chime with the blare of sirens." Very emotive
Bring me the head of Oscar!

The story and the times move on apace. Beautifully written (if you can call the horrors of the time beautiful)

Have awarded an extra star (well-deserved)

In the UK we were on the side of your characters as they fought the right-wing fascists (hope GCHQ isn't looking at this).
Its good to see you rising up the pile by the way.
And thanks for backing mine. Give me some time and I'll reciprocate
Best wishes
Darius

Darius Stransky wrote 125 days ago

Wow. I remember the situation well but only as a left-wing observer in the UK.
Have read a few chapters and it seems like a rapid fire news report.
Excellent writing
I shall return
High Stars
Best wishes to you and yours
Darius

Colleen MacDougall wrote 127 days ago

Last Tango for Che

I loved this. Thank you for bringing this important saga to our attention. The world needs to know how easily tyranny and terrorism can arise and destabilize a country. You are an excellent writer. The pacing is excellent. Backed, high stars,
Colleen
The Patron Saint of Dogs

Chip Walter wrote 128 days ago

Elina,

Great prologue which I assume sets the stage for the story that follows. It's tight, well written and gets you interested. Personal opinion--I would lose the first paragraph. I feel it's trying too hard to be dramatic before you understand the drama as a reader, therefore forced. What follows does a great job of allowing the reader to come to the same conclusion, on his or her own. Looking forward to reading more soon.

Best,
Chip
The Misadventures of Ernest Fletcher Quick

Ps like the title too.

Sheena Macleod wrote 131 days ago

Elina, I like the potted history at the beginning, bringing the reader up to speed with events. This is full of information and provides a backdrop to the story. It is well placed here.
I like the Title- Last Tango for Che.- appealing and arouses interest to read further. Also, great short pitch.
Operation Traviata, the opening is tense and visual.
I found the details of the Montoneros fascinating.
The hit by Sierra and foxtrot using the baby carriage indicates the planning and skill behind the operation.
Suggested edit – chapter one Oscar- (C)atholic (,) remarkable insight ?
A 300% inflation, this is awful and no work available.
This is a very different presentation form the norm.
Congress is dissolved and a state of emergency is declared, the situation has reached crisis point.
`Foxtrot checking for broken teeth, indicates the extent of the beating she has received. She becomes replaceable.
The meeting with Tati and the police raid s vividly portrayed.
I like - besieged by family yet embraced by none
Oscar’s actions in killing Foxtrot took me by surprise, but the reasons are implicit.
I found this very well written. The style is different, but it suits the content. There are so many details without adding any. Educational as well as a good read. The action is constant.
I can see this book doing very well.

Good luck with publishing.

Sheena
Carnival of Lies

Kaychristina wrote 157 days ago

Hasta la victoria siempre - until your victory, mi amiga Elina.

A RE-backing, all I can give for your incredible story, with love from Kay Christina xx

RonParker wrote 214 days ago

Hi Elina,

I don't usually like prologues, mainly on the grounds that readers often skip them, but I think in this case it is necessary to an understanding of your story. Quite obviously a lot of research has gone into this.

What I don't like is the present tense. I think the story would be more readable and mbe of more intetrest if it was told in more traditional third person, even if you have to do it from multiple viewpoints.

I haven't had time to read more than the first couople of chapters but in the ssection I did read, I found no grammatical errors or typos.

The story isn't for me, but it is well written and, though as I said, I don't like the style, there will be people who do. Good luck with it.

Ron

Heidi Whatcott wrote 219 days ago

This is definitely an intriguing book written in a unique style. I think the mix of fiction and historical fact suits it well, although I would like to see the fiction narrative take a larger role earlier. The moment that Oscar turns his back on Foxtrot and says "A fallen comrade isn't mourned; she is replaced" is chilling. I think if we saw Foxtrot in a more personal way earlier, that moment would be even more stunning. I think you could just leave off the story there without the later scene of Oscar throwing her off the balcony, which is a little problematic since they are at the safe house and he wouldn't do anything to draw attention to that area. I felt that was overkill and robbed the earlier scene of some of its power.

I think the scene where Oscar draws in Hector is very well done. You also have good motivation for him going after Tati. I do need a little more warning before you launch into back stories. That throws me sometimes, but the backstories are always pertinent and flesh out your characters well. You also have some excellent phrasing. I like "besieged by family yet embraced by none." The one difficulty is that there are so many references to people, cultural names, and organizations that it is sometimes difficult to keep track of who, what, and where. I think even if you simplified it, it wouldn't affect your unique style, and it would make it easier for the reader to follow.

You've chosen a difficult genre, but are definitely a talented writer and have a unique presentation. I am giving it high stars and keeping it on my watchlist to keep an eye on it. Good luck with this.

Heidi Whatcott--Crayton House

celticwriter wrote 221 days ago

this would make - i say again and again - one terrific movie

R. Dango wrote 302 days ago

This is a very interesting book. I picked it up because I liked the title. The combination of 'Last Tango' and the charismatic 'Che' evokes passion and adventure, and a slightly tragic image, which is irresistible. I liked the clean cut tone of it and I think it suits well for the dramatic facts described here.
I would want to know what kind of gold medalist Alpha was at the first line. It was intriguing but a bit frustrating to have the half-information there.
I think I'd buy this book if I see it in the shop.

R

maretha wrote 338 days ago

Last Tango for Che by Elina Castro Almeyra
The next section is packed full of action, but the thing that stands out most for me is a little tale told by Oscar, a man who has no loyalties except to the mission. As a child his father took him to Formosa, a thousand kilometres away to experience wild life and the only thing that truly captured his imagination was seeing a wounded, caged puma - the desperation of it under those circumstances, the look in its eyes.

Again, you set a specific scene, March 24 1976 when Isabel Peron is deposed in a bloodless coup after millions died during the past three years. Again, this is not an end, but a beginning, because "many will be crushed..." during the Last Call which was about to begin.

The story continues telling us about "India" and Foxtrot. Angela (Foxtrot) phones Oscar from a bar, but she and her family are already doomed, because Oscar will not do anything to help her once she has outlived her usefulness, it seems. Your description of his "persuasion" of Hector to become a courier is chilling.
Your story is very compelling. This is by no means a smooth read, but then the time period in Argentina's history was not smooth running either. So, if someone is looking for something restful to read, this will not be the story to pick up. For a read that cannot easily be put down I must give you HIGH stars and will make time to read everything you have posted. If I may make a small suggestion, if you could use someone who is more than just a line editor, just to tighten up the story, which sometimes slips from one scene to the next without clear guidelines, it might benefit the story greatly. However, your dialogue is very good and helps to set a scene and provide much information. A case in point would be the conversation between Foxtrot and her mother and then later on her conversation with Oscar. You allow them just to say enough. I'm not sure whether one would like the protagonist in the end, but one certainly would be intrigued by him and after all, that is what a writer tries to achieve. The reader must "see" the characters as being with them in their heads. Thank you for writing this. I'll be back soon. All the best in the mean time. :-)
Maretha
African Adventures of Flame, Family, Furry and Feathered Friends

maretha wrote 338 days ago

Tango for Che by Elina Castro Almeyro
Your Prologue describes Argentina's "decade of doom" with strong verbs - "throbbing with rage, seething with passion... lashing... boiling"
You describe the situation at this time with much detail, short and to the point, right up to the time when Peron takes control, September 23, 1973. This is a very specific scene setting which I feel works for a story such as this one. Just two days later (something clear to the reader) Montonero retaliated with Operacion Traviata.
I am hooked by your introduction and have to continue reading!
Maretha
African Adventures of Flame, Family, Furry and Feathered Friends

djchorus wrote 404 days ago

Elina,
I find your writing style rather unique. It balances between a piece written by a reporter and the writing of a graphic novelist. I'm not saying that's good or bad, just unique. That may or may not cause problems as you try to find an agent and publisher. To resolve that you will just need to find that one consistent voice as you tell your story.
Irregardless of the previous paragrah I did find your book engaging. It moves quickly and you keep your paragraphs short and to the point. Successful books use this same technique.
There is a grittyness to your story that makes one feel as if they are present in the action.
I give you high stars, have already place your book on my Watch List, and will put on my bookshelf this week. Congratulations on your work!
Of course I would appreciate a return read of my book, "Tucker's Way."
- David Johnson

Cathy Hardy wrote 456 days ago

This is fascinating. A very interesting period in history and written so descriptively, I was almost there. High stars!!

Antonius Metalogos wrote 457 days ago

I have read the first three chapters of your book and, being fully captivated by it, decided to back it as it most certainly deserves to be supported for many good reasons. I like the factual, 'in-the-know' tone of the narrative and also the very believable dialogue between the characters of the story. There is a nice balance of historical facts and fictional dialogue here that plays out very well on the page and holds the reader's attention fast and true. I think the pace of the story is appropriate for the subject and the genre and though it speeds along at many points, there is enough time to get a good sense of the main characters and especially, the protagonist, young Oscar Kurak. So with great pleasure, I back this fine book and rate it highly. Well done!

Lenny Banks wrote 459 days ago

Hi Elina, I took a look at chapter 3, thanks for supporting my book. I think very personal stories like this are so valuable, we only know what we saw on tele or read in newspapers, this is a window into real events and provides the most accurate account as it is the real memories of the people who were involved. Its a brave thing to write all of this down and I was hooked at the Pitch. Its well written and very informative. Good Luck with this, if the people of the world can understand each other better I don;t thing there would be so many wars.
Kindest Regards and Best Wishes
Lenny Banks
Tide and Time: At The Rock & Take Care: On The Rock

celticwriter wrote 469 days ago

We really need to make this into a movie. :-D

Seringapatam wrote 474 days ago

A fantastic read and I cant believe I have just put that down on this screen. I would never read something like this normally, but have enjoyed the first three chapters so much. You have a flow that I feel is not often seen so much. So well done with this and I will be watching it with interest.
Sean Connolly. British Army on the Rampage. (B.A.O.R)

David Andrew McGlone wrote 482 days ago

Elina
Well, well, well. I thought at first that you had made a mistake, giving me the plan of a novel. Then as I read I realised that I was literally holding my breath waiting for the next line. You have a unique, poetic style that captures the urgency and danger of the time; a style that is as fractured as the politics. I am am beyond impressed - more please.

David

celticwriter wrote 502 days ago

up where you belong, unafraid, heart like a song, a poet's wish to you, that every wish you have, forevermore comes true

@sehalliday wrote 540 days ago

Elina

Kudos to you for this creation. This work is certainly unique amongst the many books at Authonomy. Several other reviewers have rightly applauded your obvious passion to tell this story.

Unfortunately, and please remember this is just one person's opinion, I believe this work is unlikely to ever be published in its present form.

The issues are not the over-reaching use of the present tense (only moderately successful in conveying the senses of 'now' and 'urgency), or the often sterotypical characterizations, or even the sometimes chaotic veering between 'history lesson' and 'fictional narrative'. The problem is the medium of expression. Put simply, this is not a book. And here (this site), you are offering the work as exactly that.

However, the story is also compelling. I would love to see 'it' published. The question is: what is 'it' ?

At least one other reviewer notes the similarities to a screenplay. Since the screenplay presents itself via scene-descriptive sluglines, action descriptions and dialog, one can see a fit here (example from Chap 11):

--------------------------------------------

EXT. Microcentro Town Square - EVENING

The Town Center, built 200 years ago, sinks under its own weight into the surrounding marsh and riverbed. The air is humid and oppressive. At the corner of the square stands the decaying concrete Federal Police Headquarters.

PEDESTRAINS and TRAFFIC throng the square, and a LINE OF APPLICANTS surges at the Headquarters' main entrance which is fronted with SEVERAL DOZEN SOLDIERS. A NEWSPAPER VENDOR hawks the evening bulletin.

JAVIER SANTORO, 28 and well dressed and his mother PINKIE, 55 and dressed in Chanel, make their way to the head of the line.

JAVIER
Where are all these people going?

--------------------------------------------

Another advantage that the screenplay provides is mechanisms for recounting key historical details that are key to understanding the story, but detached from the actual narrative sequence. Narrator. Flashback. Photo montage, rotoscope sequence, animation, news headlines, song, poetry ... the list is endless.

Another form that might also better suit your docu-drama style might be the illustrated novel, or graphic novel.

Finally, I read recently that one author raised funding for a graphic novel project using crowdsourcing - I believe at INDIEGOGO.

Wish you the very best with this compelling piece.

Simon

Abby Vandiver wrote 540 days ago

This is very well written I think. It is easy to read and flows nicely. YOu get right to the point. Good job. Many stars from me.

Abby

celticwriter wrote 566 days ago

Still one awesome read.

Chris Whitson wrote 614 days ago

Hi Elina,
Your quick hitting writing style is unique to me. I love it and it works really well for your gripping story. You cut straight to the chase with no wasted words. Somehow, you still mangage to give the reader a vivid feel for the setting, characters, and purpose of missison. I do not have much experience reading in this particular catagory, but I'm surprised how much i like it. I think it is because your style is so abrupt, in a well crafted way, that it is super fast paced, yet easy to follow. Almost a NEWS FLASH effect. Outstanding!
Your characters are very strong and your concept and plot are developing rapidly. It appears that you have done plenty of research and are in tune with the subject matter. You have written a creative story about a brutal time in history that readers will enjoy and appreciate. You writing come across as real and will open the readers eyes to a world that so many are unfamiliar with. Great job!!
Highlest stars and recommended.
Best Wishes,
Chris / A SPICY HURRICANE

Kaychristina wrote 617 days ago

Elina, here's a re-backing for your incredible story - with that stunning new title that will surely draw everyone from here to Cuba to Argentina like moths to a flame.

I can only draw new readers who might look at these comments, to my earlier one - which is cherry-picked here! (Gracias, mi amiga!)

I can only add that an actress like Noomi Rapace (Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) might be drawn to this like one of those moths, and play your Tati in what would be a movie to rival that Dragon Tattoo, with the depth of *Kiss of the Spider Woman*.

It's compelling, excellent writing, and it's based on the truth. This really does throb to Che Guevara's tango beat.

Sent with love,

Kay-Christina xx

Kaychristina wrote 745 days ago

Re-backing for Elina, her *Tati*, and all her people in this last tango for Che. It is phenomenal work.

Nunca Mas. xx

Tom Bye wrote 748 days ago

Hello Elina-

book - Clash-

Read all six chapter posted on your well researched and informative book-
Argentina in the early 70- and the turmoil throughout the country-
You give a very good account of the happenings in short easy to read chapters- that kept me glued to the
pages- will be of value to social historians in times to come-
The short and crisp dialogue just sits in nicely as you tell this tale in diary like fashion-
recommended read
tom bye
book from hugs to kisses;
please glance at mine true story about a boy growing up in recessional times in 40s dublin- it's laced with humour-thanks Elina

elmo2 wrote 816 days ago

i liked this, will rate it well, i have never really read or saw enough on this part of history, i wish i knew it better, but what i like about this story is its insistence on seeing this conflict from the ground, giving us the thumbnail of the conflict's history in the prolougue and then revealing the conflict at street level, we get simultaneous political and personal views of the characters, the story unfolds via almost terse bits of narrative, a reporter like telling, but it is not devoid of opinion as one might expect from this sort of writing, rather it is as if the opinions and emotions are in the actions and the characters and the author is sorting through them, examining them to find the "truth" of things.

AndrewStevens wrote 821 days ago

I don’t read a lot of docu-fiction, Elina but I really enjoyed this.Highly starred and thoroughly recommended.

In terms of its blend of high tempo, unapologetically graphic action scenes and more sedate, thoughtful conversational exchanges it reminded me very much of the excellent recent TV mini series ‘Carlos’ (about Carlos the Jackal) and, to a lesser extent, the stylised French gangster biopic ‘Mesrine’ starring Vincent Cassel. It’s so difficult to both inform and entertain but ‘Clash’ [by the way, I'm really not keen on this title; it feels rather bland; is there another title you might use? maybe simply the Spanish translation?] manages this effortlessly. Terrific stuff.

The prose is very smooth with an immediate, almost filmic quality that really helps to bring the scenes alive. Real and purposeful dialogue, particularly in the action scenes. The sense of time and place is clear and involving but never intrudes on the narrative – it’s just there in the background, adding colour and depth. For the most part, the historical detail is clear and subtly evoked (although I’d watch out for occasional info-dumps). In terms of ‘plot’, despite this being a non-fiction piece, it does have the feel very much of a novel and, as such, the mix of action, drama and political intrigue should mean that it will appeal to a broad cross section of readers.

In short, a very stylish, terrifically involving opening. Thanks and best of luck. Andrew


I made some observations on the prologue/chapter 1 as I went along. Please feel free to ignore!!

Prologue:

I like the prologue. It’s concise but not overly brief and, as well as providing a very informative historical backdrop, helps to set the tone for the book. It does, however, feel a bit more like an author’s note rather than a prologue and I was wondering whether you might consider marking it as such and having it outside the main body of the text? Just a thought. Maybe also think about toning down the opening line? Having the words doom, rage, passion, fury, and revenge in the same sentence does feel a bit over the top and, to my mind, rather undermines the emotional impact of the line??


Chapter 1:

I love the punchy, energetic dialogue. Terrifically involving. Mentioning all of their ages does feel like a bit of an info dump, tho??

‘shatters his neck’ – not sure this quite works? ‘shatters’ implies something that is brittle? maybe ‘rips through’ or ‘punctures’??

I really like the pared down, direct prose. It lends the scene a terrifically involving, almost filmic feel.

‘guts of the operation’ – great line

‘courtesy [of] his marvellous youth’

‘…within the party [comma not semi-colon] inflation…’

Interesting that minority groups etc were accepted but rock and roll was still frowned upon. Informative and thought provoking revelation.

Again, I don’t think we need Foxtrot’s precise age. Maybe just hint at his youth? It feels a little like an author trying to demonstrate their research??

Terrific mental image of the pram rolling into the road and tipping over.

‘built incongruously close to the ground’ – not sure what this means??

‘enters the navel’ – ‘navel’ doesn’t feel right? maybe ‘hub’, ‘nucleus, ‘nerve centre’??

‘sets a hefty bundle of bills apart’ – a little confusing? maybe rephrase slightly?

‘need-to-know basis’ – a little too Americanised/clichéd??

I like the scene with Oscar and Marcus walking the dog although some of their exchanges feel rather stiff and unconversational? Maybe rephrase slightly so the essence of what they’re saying is preserved but it’s delivered in a more downbeat, natural manner??

I was slightly thrown by the River Plate/drought/overflow line. I eventually realised you were referring to the football club and their lack of recent trophies but initially I thought you meant a literal drought that affected the actual River Plate. Maybe rephrase?

Michael Jones wrote 823 days ago

This is a very strong, absorbing read. I followed every word with anticipation ... How many of us actually know the full story of these turbulent times .. we have only biased media coverage to rely upon. Books like this are essential to inform and create a sense of justice in the world, which is sadly lacking ...

On my shelf ... soonish.

Mick

Geddy25 wrote 831 days ago

This is a very powerful piece of writing.
I like the way it begins in a kind of documentary style - I could just imagine watching fragmets of news film with the words you have written over it as a narration.
My knowledge of the history of Argentina is very small, but you have brought it to life and educated at the same time.
I wish you every success with this book.
Mike.
(Rudolf Goes Bananas)

celticwriter wrote 846 days ago

Hey Elina, hope you're doing well. Thank you for re backing LONDON. :-)

Still think your work would make a terrific movie.

jim

Rickie Bill wrote 847 days ago

Backed Clash. Read prologue and chapter 1. This book is very timely. Even though it is about Argentina’s struggle it underlines struggle taking place in Middle East with Arab Spring and rebellion against the dictators that rule those countries. I am not an author so can’t give any suggestions on grammar or punctuations. I can tell you things I liked about your writing. Good job of giving the read the background needed to understand the story. Chapter 1 lays out the facts in a no nonsense manner. I will keep your book on my shelf for awhile so I can read further.

Clash was recommended by my friend CC Brown, author of Dark Side. Read, liked, star rated, and backed. Hope you will find a place on your shelf for their book.
RickieBill

C. Lee, MD wrote 855 days ago

This is an unusual story, but I'm backing it.

RonParker wrote 855 days ago

Hi Elina,

I enjoyed the prologue of this, but I'm afraid after that, the present tense puts me off reading. There isn't anything wrong with the story or the writing though, just the tense. I feel sure if you re-weote in past tense, especially as it is, after all, a historical, it would be more appealing.

Ron

roundrobin1 wrote 858 days ago

Elina, I cannot begin to understand the fury, the pain and the sheer devastaion of what was happening in Argentina in the 1970's. I am so fortunate to live in a country where people do not have to give up their lives to find freedom. Your book smacks the reader in the face with the situation and is very powerful. It is a universe away from my children's picture books. I wish you the best of luck. Lots of stars - Carole

roundrobin1 wrote 858 days ago

Elina, I cannot begin to understand the fury, the pain and the sheer devastaion of what was happening in Argentina in the 1970's. I am so fortunate to live in a country where people do not have to give up their lives to find freedom. Your book smacks the in the face with the situation and is very powerful. It is a universe away from my children's picture books. I wish you the best of luck. Lots of stars - Carole

PAB40 wrote 864 days ago

Hi Elina,

What a ride! Fascinating era and place, rendered with great passion and obviously genuine knowledge. I have a few criticisms which are honest thoughts I would have if standing in a bookshop wondering whether to buy it.

- the hyper-short paragraphs are easy to digest but unusual, may be partially due to the way Authonomy formats the files and breaks. After enjoying the fast pace I, like others who have commented, began to want longer more reflective pieces to get my teeth into.
- the past and present tense switches; after reading up to chapt 9 I still wasn't sure what the changes signified.

Some details:

Ch 1 Oscar recaps the mission: To destroy the government and its supporters, whatever it takes... This reads oddly, as his present mission would surely be smaller scale than that, even if overthrowing the government is his ultimate aim.

Ch 1 Alpha´s dark eyes glitter.... The light in Alpha´s eyes dazzles - repetition


Ch 1 But he need not wonder--the elder Kuraks, like thousands of parents with militant children, had chosen to respect whatever secrets their offspring might hold. - this is the kind of comment that makes me really believe in you as a reporter of events, it rings true.

Ch 1 After eighteen years of drought, River Plate was poised to win the Metropolitan tournament, and every neighborhood bar overflowed with raving fans. - I don't understand this sentence; is River Plate a baseball player?


This morning´s bloodless coup spells the end of agony for twenty-four million people battered by three years of unbridled terrorism but, one (k)new Commanding Officer and his cell are about to announce Last Call. - ? needs rewriting

Ch 2 no comments

Ch 3
"His are not the eyes of a dreamer.” - there a few of these romantic reflections and comments, and a couple of times I ended up wondering if the character would really think/ talk like that.

Ch 9
Colonel Ward takes a deep breath.  “I WANT THAT GODDAMNED COOK.  I WANT THE FACTORY, THEIR SUPPLIERS, ACCOMPLICES, FAMILIES, FRIENDS AND NEIGHBORS.  AND A COMPLETE REPORT BEFORE NOON.”  Colonel Ward marches back to his jeep.- bit too much! Emphasis could be imparted by describing Ward's appearance or manner.

So overall I obviously love this work, and the approach to the subject allows the reader to gain both an understanding and a feel for events. Personally I'd like to see the pace vary and slow down now and again, and also for the tendency to romantic and emotional intensity to be toned down in places, but that may be a boy thing!

Phil

Wanttobeawriter wrote 870 days ago

CLASH
I know almost nothing about Argentina politics so reading this was educational as well as interesting. You have a good writing style for this: clear and concise. Makes it an easy read as well. I’m sure you’ll find an audience for this among anyone who has felt a need to change the world. I’m adding this to my shelf. Wannabeawriter. Who Killed the President?

Heather26 wrote 872 days ago

I liked the way you jump straight in to the story. As soon as I started to read about Argentina conflict it brought the story and the reality of war to life. I have read the first two chapters and already I want to finish the story. Overall I could see alot of appeal to the story, its well written and draws you in. I would rate this story highly.

stevelee wrote 872 days ago

Elina - This is a remarkable story, and you tell it with such passion. I gather from your bio that you have a fair amount of first-hand knowledge of what all of this has done to the people of Argentina, and your writing here certainly reflects that intensity well.

Best of luck with this!
Steve

Salwa Samra wrote 876 days ago

Elina, this book has touched me. The western world is so remote from what you've outlined and described in throughout these chapters. I'm horrified, more so, mortified at the lack of care, concern, or respect of life - there is none!! I cannot imagine how people survived and continue to do so in such circumstances. War, crime, drugs, hate, violence, and evil so dark that it is indescribable to not react with anger and despair. Thank you for sharing this. I really do hope many doors open for you in having this published so that the world outside of Argentina may learn of the horrors you've endured.

Kaychristina wrote 877 days ago

Elina, you're transporting readers into a world, these barrios of Argentina, that probably so few knew or know anything about, and you do it with a rarely seen raw knowledge, and such heartfelt grace.

It's a fascinating history you've laid out, yet it's combined almost seamlessly with the lives of the Monteneros, of Oscar, Romeo/Hector, poor Foxtrot/Angela, and Tati, who I think readers will fear for until the very end. Even the brutal but charismatic Oscar, we can empathize with, given this background. A new Che.

Che Guevara's words resonate throughout, so powerful are they that everything these young people did can be understood. And now we have little rich girl, Tati - but what a poor little rich girl.

The way you have written this is powerful, indeed. It also gives a huge insight into what drives young people wherever such dictatorships wield their iron fists.

My only crits... not that they matter - a few tense changes, but you know, for the first time in the history of literature, I reckon, they work. If anyone says they don't work... they have no soul. Actual crit... the title. (And I cannot talk.) But I don't think it does you justice. I think you need something that stands out more - something from Che, perhaps, or *Operacion Traviata*, or *Argentina's Dirty War*, or even something like *A Traviata of Argentina*... I don't know, just something to match the power of this story.

If this were a movie, it could be a *drama-documentary*, but it's so much more than that. We have this deeply human side to it, a real story dominating the historical catastrophes. A kind of *Schindler's List* set to Che Guevara's tango beat.

I have never read anything like this. All I can do is give it 6 stars, and wish I had more. And a place on my shelf, of course.

From Kay-Christina
(*Annacara*)

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