Book Jacket

 

rank 595
word count 14225
date submitted 13.07.2011
date updated 18.10.2012
genres: Non-fiction, Instructional
classification: universal
incomplete

The Eternal Circle

C M Mackenzie

Learn how to solve problems, find love and discover what makes you really tick by recognising the hidden patterns controlling your behaviour.

 

Life can be a frustrating exercise of going round in circles. A confusing array of options promise health and wealth or beauty and fame if we buy the right products or follow the latest fashionable program; but often we are left feeling empty or disappointed and thinking—“there must be more”. If you want to find a better way that will give you more, this guide has the answers.
Over years of observation, self-examination and looking at different ways people become stuck in a rut and discontent, I have learned much about the nature of human behaviour and the patterns we all follow. In this secular guide I will show you how you can recognise these patterns and find out everything you need to know about yourself and the people you live with. No more asking-- "What am I doing?" and "Where am I going?" because you will know how to make the right choices that bring you the security you need.


 
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tags

identity, love, power, relationships, self help, trust

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30 comments

 

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Lara wrote 344 days ago

WL your book. May not be my genre but I was interested by the description. I like thoughtful. Also like quirky as you'll see if you visit http://fictionalcharacterswriting.blogspot.co.uk/. Tab, Rosalind Minett

Keith Gilbey wrote 669 days ago

Colette

I have only read the introduction and first half of the second chapter. I am hoping for a great deal! Will let oyu know when I have finished.

Keith
Peppermint

rikasworld wrote 694 days ago

This is very professionally written. It didn't come across a single typo or phrase that seemed clumsy. You explore the patterns of our lives very skilfully. Everyone can recognise themselves and others (in my case children I have taught).
A thing that interests me at the moment is how our dreams attempt to deal with loss and stress, coming up with some very odd patterns. Obviously this is not something that is under our control. It may be outside your remit but if it is something that you intend to consider I would be very interested in reading your thoughts.
Six stars from me.

Keith Gilbey wrote 698 days ago

Colette,

It is one of my greatest challenges - to get those Iork and socialise with to see the patterns of behaviour they lock themselves into - often from a very early age. I currently counsel a number of married couples who have brought themselves to the edge by this process. I love what you are trying to say - I am not totally convinced that you have a format that will lift the lid and open peoples eyes - not because what you say is wrong - but because my experience has shown me that changing people has to happen in stages they can introject and assimilate. I have read three chapters and will finish tomorrow before I go out fo the country on business for couple of weeks.
All the best
Keith
Peppermint

SteveSeven wrote 724 days ago

Hi,
I love the format of your book and the way that you travel through history to show the eternal questions and hopes that we all share. This ties well with the title, 'the Eternal Circle'.
This is a book that will meet people where they are in their inner quest and search for love and identity in such an accessible way that it will appeal to a very broad readership.
Well done, Steve
.

MarkAM wrote 778 days ago

I could only read Chapters 1-3 since Chapters 4 & 5 are listed as currently being edited. However, I do want to say that what I have read so far is enlightening and uplifting. Incorporating many principles from "A Course in Miracles," and also from the collected teachings of Ernest Holme's Religious Science, this book illustrates the importance of centering ourselves and realizing that the Spirit of the Supreme Being is present within each and every one of us. When we open to the flow of Divine Love for ourselves and for each and every other person on earth, we realize that we are all one in the Eternal Circle of Life. Thank you for these wonderful thoughts. I look forward to reading the last two chapters. - Mark

Debbie R wrote 778 days ago

The use of Pompeii to highlight how unpreictable our lives are is very effective.

Your book is very engagingly written and offers thought-provoking observations. The more I read the more I wanted to read. I particularly like the bit about patten of behaviour and the fact we like to repeat certain things in a certain way. Working with autistic youngsters certainly brings this to the forefront. These rituals, or patterns, are their security blanket.

A lot of what you write makes perfect sense and you tend not to get too bogged down with detail which makes this a relatively easy read for its subject matter.

Starring highly.

Debbie
Speedy McCready

femmefranglaise wrote 781 days ago

Hi Colette, I've read the first couple of chapters and really enjoy your writing style. I've often found, with similar book, that the writing can be slightly patronising and yours certainly isn't. It's very readable and informative and I like the way you have illustrated it with historical events. Having lived in France for many years, I can really identify with the concept that people are afraid of change and would rather muddle on than do something about their lives. I saw that happening to so many people who found that the dream and the reality were worlds apart. In my own book, my MC has moved to France on a whim and is struggling with the reality of life there and whether or not it is better to give it all up or whether moving back will mean losing face. She could do with reading this!

Very well written and a whole constellation of stars for you.

Melanie
La Vie en Rosé
La Vie en Rosé

jlbwye wrote 789 days ago

The Eternal Circle. Your pitches promise some serious help in identifying patterns in one's life. I'm intrigued - I've only discovered the patterns in mine seventy years on!

Ch.1. A profound opening sentence. One which everybody could do with pondering over and over. And the familiar story of Pompei is a lesson to us all. I like the way you include bits of history to illustrate your points. You take rather a lot of words to come to the point of this Introduction, but I am interested enough to want toread on.

Ch.2. I agree with you that life has a circular pattern, but I guess my security and the love and joy I experience comes from the presence of God in my life. In times of doubt and trouble, I just need to remember what Jesus does for me. Sometimes it is easier said than done - I wonder if you come to that realisation eventually...

Sorry I have taken so long to get to reading this. I am at present on a walking holiday, and have accumulated sooo many return reads to do, in my present situation! I would like to return to your book when the lure of sunshine and exercise in beautiful Devon is not a temptation!
Good luck with this. It is very well written - not a nit in sight, and I'm good at spotting those.

Jane (Breath of Africa).

Karamak wrote 795 days ago

I have written a book about moving to France, and after ten years our dream had not materialized.
Whilst reviewing our situation with the comments I have received on this site I have been questioning myself why didn't we move earlier why were we putting up with our situation? Reading your book has made me realize that we were afraid, afraid of change (yet again) afraid of thinking we had failed it was somehow easier to put up with it than to change it! I have read your book just when I needed answers, everything now seems a lot clearer and I need to write a chapter about this!! Wonderful book that I would recommend to anyone, it has certainly helped me so thankyou, Karen x 6*

Jannypeacock wrote 795 days ago

Couldn’t help but take a peek after reading your short pitch – I wasn’t disappointed.
I admit this is heavy and demands the reader’s full attention but it’s also very readable and the facts are spoon fed gently making for an easy read.
Very true first sentence, it’s this blunt matter-of-fact style that really makes me like this book. No waffle, just logic. Works great.
I like that the book is divided into different sections of behaviour and your definitions are backed up by example. It’s very effective. This really held my interest – liked it a lot.

Janny

Tim Haston wrote 798 days ago
michi2 wrote 834 days ago

I read your first 2 chapters and enjoyed your style of relating your thoughts to historic events to make it more understandable. The idea of the circle is an intriguing approach. It reminds me of the paying it forward concept and makes for a very useful framework of happiness. Quite a complex subject. It's amazing how much information you know and have up your sleeve to make your point. Great job!
michelle
Dummies for Dating

Red2u wrote 867 days ago

I read the first three chapters and really enjoyed the breakdown and how one can better themself. It boiils down to trust. Well done.
Regards, Red
Illusions of Comfort

Mr. Nom de Plume wrote 898 days ago

"prevents us from risking for the hope of something better." Should it be reworded as "prevents us from not risking for the hope of something better"? ....just a thought the latter was the meaning that struck me might have been intended. Risking solid ground should that be changed to 'risking unstable,' etc. ground?" Well written, good balance to paragraphs, and informative. Backed. Chuck

Diwrite wrote 913 days ago

Interesting stuff.
I particularly liked the historical references.
I'm not sure about the first sentence - I can imagine it putting people off and you can't really afford that. It might be worth rethinking your introduction. I think there's something else you can do that will have as much impact but will draw people in.
Just my humble opinion...

Shelved and starred.

Diana
Pascual's Birthday

Wanttobeawriter wrote 916 days ago

THE ETERNAL CIRCLE
This is a book with a lot of good sound advice. I read the introduction and then the chapters on love and power. I like the way you not only explain the principle of love and power, but then described a person with a problem and how that person could reverse or break what they were doing wrong. If I had a suggestion it would be to elucidate on your credentials in the introduction: are you a psychiatrist? If not, describe whatever past experiences happened in your life to make you so much more aware of how to straighten out a life than others. Either way, I think you’ll find a wide audience for this; it’s easy and enjoyable to read. I’m adding it to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?

Kady Colter wrote 935 days ago

Read all chapters posted and it's an Interesting book. I especially enjoyed learning that graffiti means "scratches." And "Cruel Lalagos, why do you not love me!"

Tweak:
In the first chapter, in the 3rd paragraph you need to delete one "the" in the sentence "...the the bawdry humour..."

If you get a chance I'd appreciate it if you could take a look at Shakespeare's Pink Cadillac" and thanks! Good luck with this book! ~Kady Colter, Shakespeare's Pink Cadillac

mselan79 wrote 953 days ago

The book is well thought our without being overly dry or too emotional. It also avoids the trap of having to buy into a certain set of beliefs for the self-help to help.;) The examples are clear and allow the reader to go past reading and into the doing in order to experience what they have read.
Well done and with some editing, I think this is a book that will actually help people to think, understand and work with their boundaries and core beliefs. Reminds me a little of the old Seth books, but more accesible.
Two possible edits I noticed:
1st chapter : Life doesn't have to be a frustrating (frustration) experience
2nd chapter: The neighbor grunts an acknowledgement........then talks about her (herself)

Good luck!

M.E.
Albert: A Gray Matter

FRAN MACILVEY wrote 955 days ago

Dear Coleen

I was interested to take a look at this book, because I write motivational texts these days and am interested in comparing.

I find there is much to amuse and interest the reader, though I feel that a thorough edit would help the text. We all need to edit. I also consider that, from the point of view of motivation, love should come first. From self love, for example, comes all the honesty we need. Some of your terminology, ("ruthlessly honest" comes to mind) suggests that change is about pushing and pushing, whereas I find that most change is about revelation by degrees.

Back to your book. I think you have an interesting framework here, which could quickly be polished into something helpful. We can all do with help such as you offer, to negotiate life's quandaries.

All the best

Fran Macilvey, "Trapped" :-)

Melissa Koehler wrote 1010 days ago

wow... im just thinking of how much effort, time and patience it must have taken for you to write this. this is very polished and not difficult to read either. your pitches were good... makes you think about your own life. i like how you different sections within the chapters- makes it much snappier to read.
i wish you the very best of luck with this,
melissa :)
Gut Instincts

Tom Bye wrote 1042 days ago

Hello Colleen.

Book--The Eternal Circle--

Read all five chapters and conclude--this is one amazing self-help book-
extremely well written and laid out in such a way that it make for easy reading.

I got so engrossed that i read it all in one sitting, well, that in itself means the book is good.
Very informative and a must read read for those of us who have any doubts of sorts, from time to time.

Helen's story in the love section makes these pages very readable indeed, as it will relate to many similar situations.

A very good book to be used for reference purposes to be read, put away and re read again to refresh the mind .

good luck with it , i have no doubt it will do well for you Colleen.

tom bye

from hugs to kisses'

strachan gordon wrote 1053 days ago

Hello Colleen I have just read the first chapter of your book and it really evinces an astounding ambition - and your first name isn't even 'Dalai' . I think it is very well written , clear and incisive and I certainly think it could be helpful to many people .I will withhold major criticism until I read more , but I think there is a limit to how much you can achieve in life on a purely thinking level , there is ,of course, an emotional, physical and spiritual dimension . Nevertheless , a very great deal can be gleaned by thinking for example about recurring mistakes in ones life or recurring anxieties , or temporary fear or anguish . I think you can teach yourself common sense which so often flies out of the window when emotional matters come along . I don't know if you have the time , but I wonder if it would be possible for you to take a look at the first chapter of my novel 'A Buccaneer' , which is an historical , adventure romance set in the 17th century and includes lost love , the Great Plague of London , Sir Henry Morgan , beautiful Spanish Ladies , a five-handed duel and much more , with best wishes from Strachan Gordon . Watchlisted and starred.

Walden Carrington wrote 1055 days ago

Colleen,
The Eternal Circle is a very easy to follow guidebook. It's deeply insightful and presents truths about the needs of humans which have remained constant throughout the generations. This is one I wanted more time to read and would have been unable to pass up in a bookstore. Six stars for a practical guide to living.

Walden Carrington
Titanic: Rose Walsh McLean's Story

fullmoon wrote 1077 days ago

I have been re working the intro and it will be published shortly

Hi Colleen

I found this a strange book to read. It comes across as a self help book, the type you'd see a celeb clutching while being papped, and it's obviously something you've put great thought into. The introduction, for me, felt a bit flat if I'm honest. I wasn't quite sure what was coming in further chapters.

The 'Love' chapter was one I liked. The case study of Helen was nicely written and, as a chicklit reader, something I'm very familliar with. There is a definite market for this, whether its as a self help book, or the kind of thing you see in the states with those conference type things - everyone always seeks the answers to happiness and you have some good ideas in here.

Is it my kind of read - not really, if I'm honest, but then I like escapism. I have to say though, in my current circumstances, your advice is pretty useful. Not sure if that's a good thing or not!

Five stars from me.

Silva
x

silvachilla wrote 1077 days ago

Hi Colleen

I found this a strange book to read. It comes across as a self help book, the type you'd see a celeb clutching while being papped, and it's obviously something you've put great thought into. The introduction, for me, felt a bit flat if I'm honest. I wasn't quite sure what was coming in further chapters.

The 'Love' chapter was one I liked. The case study of Helen was nicely written and, as a chicklit reader, something I'm very familliar with. There is a definite market for this, whether its as a self help book, or the kind of thing you see in the states with those conference type things - everyone always seeks the answers to happiness and you have some good ideas in here.

Is it my kind of read - not really, if I'm honest, but then I like escapism. I have to say though, in my current circumstances, your advice is pretty useful. Not sure if that's a good thing or not!

Five stars from me.

Silva
x

Paul T. Hughes wrote 1095 days ago

Interesting intorduction to your book. Not my usual fix on Authonomy if I'm truthful.

It's a depressing thought that the only thing in life tha tis certain is death. Your discussion of hope interested me though and reminded me of a scripture that I like.
'Wherefore if a man (or woman) have faith he must needs have hope; for without faith there cannot be any hope.
And again, behold I say unto you that he (or she) cannot have faith and hope, save he shall be meek, and lowly of heart.'
If you can find the quote without using Google/ ANOther search engine I'll back your book (if I like the subsequent chapters of course!)
You're on my watchlist.
Paul

Wendy Proteau wrote 1101 days ago

Having read through, I find your ability in finding patterned behavior and thought processes interesting. There are several points that had me question my own views of life and how it plays out. The chapters are long and i would recommend shortening the size. Some sentences need trimming to get to the point, and punctuation would benefit the flow, but that will come with tweaking. I definately like the way the writing makes one question, and the way you divide each thought process. I think this could inspire many to view their life differently. It's a refreshing voice on a topic that many have pondered for ages.

Best of luck
Wendy
'And When'

fullmoon wrote 1102 days ago

Thank you Mr. Nom de Plume for leaving your well thought out comment. There is a reason why I used the first person plural ‘we’. The aim running through the book is to show how much better life could be if the individual ‘I’ dimension is swapped for the more inclusive ‘us’ perspective by reasoning why ‘we’ all repeat common behaviour but fail to read the consequences it has on either 'I' or 'us'; a sort of step by step guide to achieving ‘The Big Society’ (the current mantra of the British Government that no one can pin down with a rational explanation). However, I have taken the point on board and will consider it when I edit the remaining zones.

"Daily Practice--look for patterns" is a wonderful tie-in with the "about me" material. Writing in the first person plural (we) in Latin tenses is dicy and in my opinion needs careful attention or the "we need to do this and we need to do that" for example might be overbearing to some. The thought process presented is on the brilliant side in terms of insight to the "human condition." The writing is refreshing and the message is wonderful. Good luck with it.

Mr. Nom de Plume wrote 1102 days ago

"Daily Practice--look for patterns" is a wonderful tie-in with the "about me" material. Writing in the first person plural (we) in Latin tenses is dicy and in my opinion needs careful attention or the "we need to do this and we need to do that" for example might be overbearing to some. The thought process presented is on the brilliant side in terms of insight to the "human condition." The writing is refreshing and the message is wonderful. Good luck with it.

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