Book Jacket

 

rank 502
word count 114248
date submitted 16.07.2011
date updated 05.07.2012
genres: Non-fiction, Biography, Harper True...
classification: moderate
complete

Invisible Child

Mary hayward

Child begger, graduates as Counsellor to help others, like herself.

 

When Mary is eight the burden of begging for food begins. When her mother suffers TB, her father falls into drunkenness and she is left to starve with her little four year old sister.
As a teenager she is raped and betrayed by her best friend. She marries and then life falls apart when her best friend shoots herself.. She is betrayed with her child, alone and cast out onto the streets once more. Yet when she needs help she is turned away. She gets a check list, and finally she finds a love, so powerful that it took her breath away. Climbing out of poverty becomes her mission so that she can help children like herself.

 
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tags

adaption, adoption, alcoholic, beaten, begging, betrayal, child abuse, child neglect, children, divorce, domestic violence, drink, family relatioinshi...

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30 comments

 

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Neville wrote 638 days ago

Invisible Child.
By Mary Hayward.


This is such a harrowing account of your early years in Edmonton, North London.
The constant rows between your mum and dad, not forgetting the lack of a decent meal, or proper warmth of a fire.
You certainly did go through it, so to speak.
Things got worse when Les is forced out of the home, you were just a drudge—shame on your parents!
To have to go begging to shop keepers for food on tick with no intention of paying them back must have been heart breaking for you.
If it’s any consolation to you, I would say that you’ve been fortunate to have come through it all with dignity and the ability to write—you are a good writer, there’s no doubt in my mind.
To have put pen to paper like you have done here has brought out your inner resources…you have a lot going for you.
You have good description and dialogue running through what I see as a very excellent read, it takes a lot of courage to write a true story of a miserable upbringing…you’ve done it well.
I would recommend your book to anyone to read…and learn from as well.
Childhood is never forgotten, nor time diminish the severity of your upbringing to a point where forgiveness is acceptable.
Many stars and I will shelve your book as soon as I can!

Best wishes to you,

Neville. The Secrets of the Forest – The Time Zone.

jessicajones wrote 639 days ago

Hi Mary,
This is a very sad story to read (so far), you write in a very expressive and informative way, making it easy to empathise. Very easy to get sucked in and just keep reading.
After the first couple of chapters, I felt I knew the characters and their 'story's' well.

I will keep you on my WL and read more later. High stars.

Best wishes
Jessica

The world through my eyes

GCleare wrote 646 days ago

Invisible Child

This is very evocative and contains some great mood-setting phrases:…”panda eyes”…”as long as I held my cup firmly when the train went by”…”suck the black damp from the air”. You are an interesting writer, with an inspiring story to tell.

But I found the beginning confusing, with a lot of characters and data presented very quickly. It was hard to sink into the story. Do you really need four dates in a row in the first three paragraphs? The story really starts when she was nine, so you might think about starting the book in 1957 with the line “I was just nine years old…” and folding the backstory about her parents and half brother into her thoughts afterwards. You can deal with Joyce when you get to her, that first sentence leads us nowhere in this chapter. Better to plunge into the drama soon as possible, I think.

Your story is intense and moving, and your use of language is very strong.

~Gail SECRETS WE KEEP

patio wrote 657 days ago

This a moving story

Tod Schneider wrote 658 days ago

This is certainly an interesting, heart-felt story. It is so brave to write memoir! In my opinion, your strongest suit is when you bring us into the action, showing instead of telling. This really starts, for me, with the dialog well into chapter 2, and if I was to do anything radically different here, that's where I'd suggest starting. There are many parts up until then that could be enlivened by showing us through dialog rather than catching us up on dad's history, etc.
But overall your writing is both moving and professional. I wish you well with this!

Tod
http://authonomy.com/books/40646/the-lost-wink/

MaryHayward wrote 660 days ago

Is this 'your' story, Mary? I hope not. I hope this is fiction.


Ellise, Yes, Invisible Child is the true story of my life. I have researched the details to confirm timescales, visited locations, established facts reported in the newspapers of the time so as I could be sure that things happened as I described. I have spoken to ex husband Terry and he has filled in some gaps, and also contacted some family and friends of the time. I have set up a website, www.maryhayward.co.uk and there you will find the pictures of me and places mentioned in the book.

Mary Hayward

Weaver Reads wrote 660 days ago

Is this 'your' story, Mary? I hope not. I hope this is fiction.

TDonna wrote 733 days ago

Gripping first chapter for me. Great start. It flowed so well and your writing so smooth, the scenes were powerful and visual. You definitely intrigued. I like the chapter ending as well, for it made me want to read on, which I will do very soon.
T.Donna
(No Kiss Good-bye)

Adeel wrote 739 days ago

Writing Biography is not an easy thing but you have done it so fantastically that makes me to read more of it. A hooking story which deserves to be termed as excellent. Highly starred.

Six Foot Bonsai wrote 739 days ago

Hello Mary. I've skipped around reading several chapters. It's not the way most folks read books, but honestly I have so many I want to check out and a job that takes too many of my personal hours.

First of all, the struggles of being poor and trying to raise childre- find love are relatable topics to many. That's good. Your cador also is a strong feature of your writing.

My suggestions (and I'm not a professional) would be to shorten the word count. When I first sat down to write my story of becoming a Japanse wife, I included practically everything I could remember. A grad student did me a favor and read my 2nd major draft and told me to take out scenes that didn't make the main premise move forward- then fluff up the remainder with better descrptions. Generally your descriptions are strong, but I would think about what is not adding value. I hope this make sense.

So many people on this site give only praise. Personally I prefer the good and bad. I hope you are cool with my short commentary. Keep crafting your story! It is totally worth it.

Sincerely. Stacy Gleiss

Davidmauriceware wrote 791 days ago

Excellent written story. very intriguing and that makes me want to read more and more. You have a story that will do very ,very well here on authonomy.Highly starred and placed on my w/l list.I will be keeping an eye on this 1. Great job.

MaryHayward wrote 876 days ago

Thank you for reading Invisible Child, and for your observations on the first chapter. I guess that the first chapter has so much to say about the impact of the death of Joyce, that perhaps I get lost in my words. The other chapters are dealing with me as a child and perhaps I know myself with more understanding.

I really appreciate your candour. Thank you so much.

Mary

FRAN MACILVEY wrote 877 days ago

I have read the first three chapters of your story. The first chapter I struggled with because parts of the text could do with a good edit, a tidy up, to it easier to read and in parts, less repetitive.

Then I read chapters two and three and something changed. In the dialogue passages your writing is natural, unforced, it flows well and pulls the reader along effortlessly - much better! You have a good ear for convincing dialogue, between you and your mother for example. The words speak for themselves. You hardly need to point out your hardships to us, you see, because in the story you tell, they are obvious to us. This is the style of writing that would suit you best, I feel.

You are a good writer, and with a sympathetic editor there is no reason why this book cannot be a gripping read. Parts of it already are.

All the best,

Fran Macilvey, "Trapped"

Melissa Koehler wrote 930 days ago

wow this is... hard, yet amazing to read. its different from other books and i think thats whats going to keep people reading this. your pitches are both really good- made me want to read more, and i love your cover too. i dont really have anything bad to say about this... how can you critique something that is YOUR life? i dont think you can, its written the way your story happened. i wish you the very best of luck with this.
melissa :)
Gut Instincts

Beth Tasker wrote 933 days ago

Mary

It took courage and strength to write this. I admire you and your work.

I have only read the first few chapers but want to read on even though it is very difficult to live what you went through.

Beth

missmaria wrote 954 days ago

Dear Mary,
Your story is heartbreaking and before i knew it, i was well into chapter five. So many children around the world suffer in silence, and as you grow into adulthood, you pretend it never happened, you try to forget the pain and the tears and carry on as best as you can, but the sadness never goes away, does it? No, you'll never get your childhood back, but reading your words i feel your strength, you're a survivor.
I pray for God's guidance all the time, and i pray He keep you well, Mary.
Six stars and on my shelf.
Maria
"Angelina"

strachan gordon wrote 958 days ago

A very dramatic start , that's the way to do it - hook the reader straight away , you don't have much time to get them in the book store and you also are writing out of personal experience , which gives your writing force and veracity . I look forward to reading thed rest of it . I don't know if you have the time , but I wonder if you would be able to look at the first chapter of my novel 'A Buccaneer' ,which is an historical adventure romance set inj the 17th century and includes Pirates , lost love , the Great Plague of London , Sir Henry Morgan , beautiful Spanish ladies and much more . watchlisted and starred. With best wishes from Strachan Gordon

MaryHayward wrote 959 days ago

Hi Leni

Just posted a few more chapters. I don't know if you get notified? Mary

This book is so hard to put down. It keeps nagging to know what's next. Oh, to be held in suspense.

MaryHayward wrote 963 days ago

hi Leni,

This book is so hard to put down. It keeps nagging to know what's next. Oh, to be held in suspense.


It is so lovely to hear that you are reading my work yet at the same time I am ashamed that this all happened to me. The remaining chapters have not yet been uploaded. If you think that childhood was difficult, and my early life painful, then you have yet to read the rest. My life takes some dramatic twists and turns, and some frightful downs, and yet there is an unexpected period of truly inspiring fighting back. Finally finding a love that comes but once in a lifetime, so powerful that it took my breath away.
I will try and upload some more chapters in the next few days. Thank you so much, regards, Mary

leni roman wrote 963 days ago

This book is so hard to put down. It keeps nagging to know what's next. Oh, to be held in suspense.

MaryHayward wrote 970 days ago

Hi Tom

Thank you so much for reading my book. I am touched by your insight. You understand the feelings so well that I am compelled to look at your book, and will do so tomorrow.

Thank you. I will post some more chapters if I get a chance in the next few days. My journey has much to travel, and although childhood is nearing a close, my adult life becomes even more surprising, with many twists and turns.

Thank you once again, Mary


Hello Mary-
book -Invisible Child'

Read all 23 chapters of this book in one sitting last night and made notes.
Wow! what a read it is, hear-breaking or should say heart-wrenching, it's a story that need to be read over and over to get the true depth of the life you have suffered, Mary. I \understand ever page of it, as i can relate to your story., read my book for similarities.
the story related to the convalescent home is so convincing and not to mention the horror of the rape scend in chapter 22.
you are indeed a very brave woman to have told this story, it is obvious that it comes straight from the heart.
How can one forget, those like yourself who had to go to the shop with a note, looking for food on tick.
I found this book as i read it , so hard to put down and glad i did not. it certainly conjures up the smells and sounds of living in those conditions. and all of the people so real as you describe the situations.

i wish you good luck with this book and its gets my six stars as one of the better in it's genre

Tom Bye Dublin Ireland
please read mine for comparisons and hopefully you might back or comment, thanks

Tom Bye wrote 971 days ago

Hello Mary-
book -Invisible Child'

Read all 23 chapters of this book in one sitting last night and made notes.
Wow! what a read it is, hear-breaking or should say heart-wrenching, it's a story that need to be read over and over to get the true depth of the life you have suffered, Mary. I \understand ever page of it, as i can relate to your story., read my book for similarities.
the story related to the convalescent home is so convincing and not to mention the horror of the rape scend in chapter 22.
you are indeed a very brave woman to have told this story, it is obvious that it comes straight from the heart.
How can one forget, those like yourself who had to go to the shop with a note, looking for food on tick.
I found this book as i read it , so hard to put down and glad i did not. it certainly conjures up the smells and sounds of living in those conditions. and all of the people so real as you describe the situations.

i wish you good luck with this book and its gets my six stars as one of the better in it's genre

Tom Bye Dublin Ireland
please read mine for comparisons and hopefully you might back or comment, thanks

MaryHayward wrote 974 days ago

Dean, Thank you for your kind words.

Mary

I really admire your courage alongside you skill as a writer to address and highlight some very painfull topics. My childhood because of whatt I had to go through, would not be percieved as a "normal" childhood and prehaps that qualifies me somewhat to comment on your story.

I'll be giving you 5 stars - only because it deserves it and I love your pacey, fast moving writng

well done

Dean

judoman wrote 974 days ago

Mary

I really admire your courage alongside you skill as a writer to address and highlight some very painfull topics. My childhood because of whatt I had to go through, would not be percieved as a "normal" childhood and prehaps that qualifies me somewhat to comment on your story.

I'll be giving you 5 stars - only because it deserves it and I love your pacey, fast moving writng

well done

Dean

Michael Croucher wrote 982 days ago

A gripping start and lots of pull to this story. These are difficult topics to write about and you've done a really good job of bringing the reader into tragic reality and keeping their interest. Nicely done.
Michael Croucher (Bravo's Veil)

David Price wrote 995 days ago

Mary,

Chapter 3 is heart-breaking, and it confirms your gift for story-telling. I was right there with you on those grocery door-steps, feeling your pain, hunger and the injustice of your circumstances.

People who are lucky enough to have 'normal' childhoods can never truly appreciate the damage done to innocent minds by such appalling neglect and abuse, a situation you address well in the final paragraph of this chapter. How on earth do survivors like you and me tell our stories without alienating our readers? In this respect, you are doing a marvellous job.

I'm not the fastest reader, and your work demands my full attention, so I will finish it as and when I can. But it is definitely a book worthy of support.

David

David Price wrote 996 days ago

Have read the first two chapters Mary. You write with clarity and purpose, and I think your story is well-constructed and compelling. I look forward to reading more.

And thanks again for backing 'Master Act'.

David

s stocker wrote 1000 days ago

Really a provocative story to read. I gave you a five star rating and will continue to read the chapters.

Susan Stocker
Kissing Your Elbow

strachan gordon wrote 1001 days ago

Hello Mary , welcome to authonomy , I hope you will find it as I have, a fascinating experience. I think you have a fascinating story to tell, in what is becoming an increasingly popular genre. you write extremely well and very vividly and i think you are right to begin with the death of your friend. Starred and watchlisted, I wonder if you would have the time to look at my novel 'A Buccaneer' which is an historical , adventure romance which includes lost love, the Great Plague of London , Sir Henry Morgan, the attack on Panama 1671 , Spanish ladies and much more , with best wishes, Strachan Gordon

mrsdfwt wrote 1012 days ago

Dear Mary,
A very intense and emotional story. Poverty and children ring a sad note in my heart, and Invisible Child is no exception. The characters are so painfully real, and the circumstances heartbreaking. It angers me when parents starve their children and use the little money they have for alcohol and fags. It seems the fifties and sixties were agonizing times for many children in this world, but i am so proud that we prevailed, and lived to tell the stories.
Five stars and some shelf space for sure, when possible.
God bless you Mary.
Maria
Dark of the Moon

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