Book Jacket

 

rank 2045
word count 13513
date submitted 08.02.2012
date updated 17.12.2012
genres: Non-fiction, Popular Science, Trave...
classification: universal
incomplete

The Easternmost House: A Year of Life on the Edge of England

Juliet Blaxland

Utopian cliff-top dispatches from a windblown coastal cottage, conjuring a magical landscape of light and sky and water, and the wild creatures that share it.

 

Being the first to see the sun each day invests this place with a primitive spirit of optimism

This little book may bore you to tears or send you into a hypnotic trance with its unavoidable soundtrack of crashing waves. The 'characters' may be wild animals or birds and the 'plot' may be a sandstorm or a shipwreck, but all of it is true and real.

Life here is brightened and disrupted by nature and the outdoors, but it is not the neatly visited outdoors of rucksacks and rambling and the nature-spotter's notebook. This is the lived-in outdoors of the everyday, of the firewood forager, the improviser, the poet-adventurer.

This is essentially a book of solace and escape: from modernity, from urban life, from the tyranny of office walls and hours, and even from the mass of humanity itself. I wish you could come and stay in this bright landscape of land and sea and sky, but you can always visit the Easternmost House vicariously instead, cleverly avoiding the untidy inconveniences and creature discomforts inherent in a life lived so closely connected to the natural world. There is no better place than this.

 
rate the book

to rate this book please Register or Login

 

tags

animals, beach, beachcombing, cliffs, dunes, greyhounds, gulls, migrations, nature, otters, robinson crusoe, sea, seals, shipwreck, sky, solstice, sta...

on 5 watchlists

10 comments

 

To leave comments on this or any book please Register or Login

subscribe to comments for this book
Sharda D wrote 748 days ago

Hi Juliet,
I absolutely loved this. Your writing is so calm and beautiful and I could picture it all so clearly. Lovely use of sensory vocabulary - all the sounds and smells as well as the sights. Funny too, you manage to liberally intersperse the descriptions with philosophy and humour, a perfect balance. There is alot to be said for living more at the mercy of nature and there is something infinitely more life enhancing about the wild parts of the world than the pretty ones.
It sounds a wonderful place.
Have given you 6 stars and will think about backing, but might need to do some rejigging.
Sounds just the sort of thing they have on R4's excellent "book of the week". Maybe I'll hear it on there one day!
All the best,
Sharda.

Amy Pope wrote 762 days ago

Loved my visit to the Eastermost House - hope it doesn't fall in the sea for a while yet. No wonder you champion living in the moment!. The writing makes this part of Suffolk and the lifestyle so vivid it is as you say a vicarious experience of coastal living, in the company of an author who is bright and funny, who absorbs and shares and charms. The learned and poetic digressions really gleam (Stendhal's Anonymous - brilliant), and the Bedouins getting lost as the winds transform the desert. These and the natural observations really shine and enrich the seductive descriptive passages. It made me want to read your other books, so I am.... I can easily visualise these being serialised on radio. This should be much higher in the charts.

Amy Pope wrote 791 days ago

I love what you're doing here - I'm a fan of Roger Deakin (and I can't tell you how obsessed I was about ring of Bright Water as a teenager). Just left the city to live rural myself, so look forward to absorbing your thoughts and experiences. I love your comment below in response to 'corrent procedures'... made me laugh. I am reading you, but you're on my WL until I find room on the old shelf.

CatherineM wrote 658 days ago

Juliet, I am so intrigued by this book! I look forward to reading more. I was wondering, have you read much Annie Dillard? She is so, so brilliant. I dedicated a thread to her on the forums page (Ann, Anne, and Annie); bop over and check out her quotes if you are interested. She seems to have a kindred spirit to you.

Catherine Morgan
Nickel Ridge

fayha wrote 739 days ago

I loved the pace of this it flows beautifully. I have read only two chapters and can't wait to read more. I loved in chapter two the words you used to describe the sounds of the waves on the beach, brilliant. On my watchlist highly starred.

Tod Schneider wrote 744 days ago

Very nicely, thoughtfully written! This is very peaceful writing, hypnotic, which is just right for what it's about, I think. You've brought the rhythm of the sea into the writing. Your feel for the language and the voice of your writing or all of one piece. Best of luck with this!
-- Tod Schneider
The Lost Wink

Sharda D wrote 748 days ago

Hi Juliet,
I absolutely loved this. Your writing is so calm and beautiful and I could picture it all so clearly. Lovely use of sensory vocabulary - all the sounds and smells as well as the sights. Funny too, you manage to liberally intersperse the descriptions with philosophy and humour, a perfect balance. There is alot to be said for living more at the mercy of nature and there is something infinitely more life enhancing about the wild parts of the world than the pretty ones.
It sounds a wonderful place.
Have given you 6 stars and will think about backing, but might need to do some rejigging.
Sounds just the sort of thing they have on R4's excellent "book of the week". Maybe I'll hear it on there one day!
All the best,
Sharda.

Amy Pope wrote 762 days ago

Loved my visit to the Eastermost House - hope it doesn't fall in the sea for a while yet. No wonder you champion living in the moment!. The writing makes this part of Suffolk and the lifestyle so vivid it is as you say a vicarious experience of coastal living, in the company of an author who is bright and funny, who absorbs and shares and charms. The learned and poetic digressions really gleam (Stendhal's Anonymous - brilliant), and the Bedouins getting lost as the winds transform the desert. These and the natural observations really shine and enrich the seductive descriptive passages. It made me want to read your other books, so I am.... I can easily visualise these being serialised on radio. This should be much higher in the charts.

Linda Lou wrote 783 days ago

THE EASTERNMOST HOUSE
JULIET BLAXLAND
hullo Juliet. I live in the States so I has a bit of a quandry following some of your text but.it sounds like a fascinating place and situation. I live on the water too but alas it is only a lake and not the ocean. I can only imagine that. I enjoy non-fiction and that is now I located your book which is very good. Please consider my non-fiction although it is quite different than this and thanks for that.Will back when the space presents itself but the stars will abound. LLL

Amy Pope wrote 791 days ago

I love what you're doing here - I'm a fan of Roger Deakin (and I can't tell you how obsessed I was about ring of Bright Water as a teenager). Just left the city to live rural myself, so look forward to absorbing your thoughts and experiences. I love your comment below in response to 'corrent procedures'... made me laugh. I am reading you, but you're on my WL until I find room on the old shelf.

scargirl wrote 798 days ago

this is a warm book, making me want to step inside, as i am on the outside looking in...enjoy your journey...
j
what every woman should know

Juliet Blaxland wrote 799 days ago

Dear Carolyn,
Thanks so much for your very valid crit. You may laugh to learn that I 'haven't followed the usual procedures in uploading', bejumbled as our comms were swept away by a snowstorm, which is the perfect real-life illustration of exactly what I am trying to convey; the total separateness that 'nature' can bestow on us all now if we take even a small step away from the cosy orange glow of the urban huddle towards remoteness. This is written in pencil on ruled A4 file paper, folded to make a little aeroplane... whoof...

Juliet,
I think your book deserves to be read, but you haven't followed the usual procedures in uploading a manuscript. First, you need a proper pitch; the pitch you've used is really the first couple of paragraphs of your book.

Second, I didn't reach what looks like the real first chapter until chapter 3. When I first downloaded the book to give it a read, at the point where generally I'm getting the actual first chapter of a book, there's a table of contents. Then I went to chapter 2, and there's something that looks like a foreword. Not until chapter 3 does it seem like I've reached the actual beginning of the book.

I see that you are new on Authonomy. (I'm pretty new, too). The game here is people try to read a LOT of books; it's a bit like editors going through the slush pile. I suspect most people don't read much more than the first chapter, and sometimes only the first paragraph. And they take the pitch very seriously. So I'd make these changes in order to be read.

I hope this helps! Good luck,
Carolyn Brown Heinz
Mage at Midnight

Carolyn Brown Heinz wrote 799 days ago

Juliet,
I think your book deserves to be read, but you haven't followed the usual procedures in uploading a manuscript. First, you need a proper pitch; the pitch you've used is really the first couple of paragraphs of your book.

Second, I didn't reach what looks like the real first chapter until chapter 3. When I first downloaded the book to give it a read, at the point where generally I'm getting the actual first chapter of a book, there's a table of contents. Then I went to chapter 2, and there's something that looks like a foreword. Not until chapter 3 does it seem like I've reached the actual beginning of the book.

I see that you are new on Authonomy. (I'm pretty new, too). The game here is people try to read a LOT of books; it's a bit like editors going through the slush pile. I suspect most people don't read much more than the first chapter, and sometimes only the first paragraph. And they take the pitch very seriously. So I'd make these changes in order to be read.

I hope this helps! Good luck,
Carolyn Brown Heinz
Mage at Midnight

1