Book Jacket

 

rank 3399
word count 20851
date submitted 09.03.2012
date updated 13.03.2012
genres: Non-fiction, History, Popular Cultu...
classification: universal
incomplete

In the Shadow of Inspiration

Julian Ashbourn

A non-fiction work which combines a very strong human interest with aspects of conservation, all underpinned with some stunning imagery and a surprise last chapter

 

In the Shadow of Inspiration re-visits the story of Grey Owl and Anahareo and brings it into a contemprary context in a fascinating blend of old and new. There are additional chapters which cover the indigenous peoples of Canada and the homesteaders, as well as a chapter for children. From the scientific perspective, the book focuses upon natural history and the conservation of our planet and introduces a valuable new concept for collaborative conservation. This book is a rare gem which will make you think, make you laugh, and might make you cry. But you will want to read it again and again. It would also represent a wonderful gift as it is an object of beauty in its own right.

 
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tags

canada, conservation, environment, geology, grey owl, landscapes, natural history, poetry, science, sociology

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19 comments

 

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David Price wrote 679 days ago

Julian, I've read chapter 1, and dipped into the other three. This is beautifully written, heart-felt, and full of wisdom. Not only that, you make me want to visit the places you describe so vividly. Like you, I revere, honour and respect nature, and feel sad that so many people go through life without experiencing its wild glories and stunning beauty. I truly hope your wonderfully realized work will find its way into many people's lives. Six stars from me.
David
MASTER ACT: a memoir

uncas wrote 737 days ago

Thanks Scott,

It is quite different from much of what is posted on Authonomy, but glad you liked it. I wish I had your view of the mountains......

Julian,

As I begin my read of your book I find such truth in your words and emotion for nature in the world! Your book is a great and important read and I have starred it highly. I'll be back soon for more!

Have a fantastic day and thanks for your time with The Ark of Humanity!

- Scott, The Ark of Humanity

Scott Toney wrote 737 days ago

Julian,

As I begin my read of your book I find such truth in your words and emotion for nature in the world! Your book is a great and important read and I have starred it highly. I'll be back soon for more!

Have a fantastic day and thanks for your time with The Ark of Humanity!

- Scott, The Ark of Humanity

uncas wrote 746 days ago

Dear Adeel,
Thank you for your kind and encouraging words. I am now working on a follow up to this work which I hope will also prove interesting.

A lovely, well-written book. You have no doubt rendered an excellent job in drawing a fabulous introduction. Your style of narrating events is vivid and can hook readers in to the story. Highly starred.

Adeel wrote 747 days ago

A lovely, well-written book. You have no doubt rendered an excellent job in drawing a fabulous introduction. Your style of narrating events is vivid and can hook readers in to the story. Highly starred.

uncas wrote 762 days ago

Dear Georgia, Thank you for your kind comments - I am so glad you like the book - it is a little different and, in fact, becomes more diverse as it continues.
Regards,
Julian

I read through chapter one and half of chapter two this evening. Lovely, well written book! I enjoyed the chapter about the early pioneers in Saskatchewan, Canada. I loved the references to Van Gogh and Beethoven. Highly starred! Georgia
The Woman From E.A.R.L.

earthlover wrote 762 days ago

I read through chapter one and half of chapter two this evening. Lovely, well written book! I enjoyed the chapter about the early pioneers in Saskatchewan, Canada. I loved the references to Van Gogh and Beethoven. Highly starred! Georgia
The Woman From E.A.R.L.

uncas wrote 765 days ago

Dear Shelby,
I really like your adventure story - this is the sort of thing that everybody can enjoy. I have left a comment for you accordingly.
Kind regards,
Julian

This introduction is really good. It sets a mood and history is always fun to dive into.
You do a great job at wording things correctly for the readers to understand and not knocking him over the head with too much info.
The title is good.
Shall read more later on.

Shelby Z./Driving Winds

P.S. Please take a look at my pirate adventure Driving Winds, when you have time.

Shelby Z. wrote 765 days ago

This introduction is really good. It sets a mood and history is always fun to dive into.
You do a great job at wording things correctly for the readers to understand and not knocking him over the head with too much info.
The title is good.
Shall read more later on.

Shelby Z./Driving Winds

P.S. Please take a look at my pirate adventure Driving Winds, when you have time.

uncas wrote 766 days ago

Dear Fran,

Thank you very much for your encouraging words - I do try to maintain a varied interest for readers. As you have gathered, the subjects touched upon in the book mean much to me personally and I now have another project which will build upon this. Its a pity you cannot see the imagery from the book - it is very beautiful. See more on http://ashbourn.zzl.org
Take care,
Kind regards,
J

Dear Julian

I have read most of what is posted here: chapters one and two, most of three and four. I would happily read more, as you write in a light and well informed style which manages to be enlightening and entertaining at the same time. I love books I can learn from, and those that I enjoy. Your book manages both.

You write with eloquence about the emergence of the movement for ecological justice and restoration. Your subject matter urgently needs to be heard. Much of what you describe we know already. We know that we must learn to take care of what is precious. We know that we are part of an integral system without which we will perish, though the world, pursuing its own inscrutable agenda, may well survive. We know all this, yet too often we prefer to forget, and no amount of hectoring will help to change our ways.

Your book is therefore welcome, as it avoids the pitfalls of preaching. Unlike me. I better stop now. You have written a marvelous book and I hope you upload some more. Meantime, perhaps you might consider reformatting some of your longer paragraphs for easier reading.

In your chapter "The Homesteaders" at the end of the second paragraph, I think you may want a word where you write "that few NOW might come to understand."

All the best to you. Please keep writing.

Fran Macilvey, "Trapped" :)

FRAN MACILVEY wrote 767 days ago

Dear Julian

I have read most of what is posted here: chapters one and two, most of three and four. I would happily read more, as you write in a light and well informed style which manages to be enlightening and entertaining at the same time. I love books I can learn from, and those that I enjoy. Your book manages both.

You write with eloquence about the emergence of the movement for ecological justice and restoration. Your subject matter urgently needs to be heard. Much of what you describe we know already. We know that we must learn to take care of what is precious. We know that we are part of an integral system without which we will perish, though the world, pursuing its own inscrutable agenda, may well survive. We know all this, yet too often we prefer to forget, and no amount of hectoring will help to change our ways.

Your book is therefore welcome, as it avoids the pitfalls of preaching. Unlike me. I better stop now. You have written a marvelous book and I hope you upload some more. Meantime, perhaps you might consider reformatting some of your longer paragraphs for easier reading.

In your chapter "The Homesteaders" at the end of the second paragraph, I think you may want a word where you write "that few NOW might come to understand."

All the best to you. Please keep writing.

Fran Macilvey, "Trapped" :)

fatema wrote 769 days ago

Hi how iwill put it on my book shelf and back yours and you do same to mine. Ache in my heart

uncas wrote 769 days ago

Dear Faith,

Thank you so much for your kind comments - certainly this book is very special to me and I am glad that you are also enjoying it. I am currently working on something which leads on from this thread quite nicely - we shall have to see whether it manages to surface.
Good luck with all of your own endeavours, I will look forward to seeing more of your work on Authonomy
Kind regards,
Julian

.

Dear Julian,

You write with such passion! I read your first two chapters and truly felt your heart on these pages.

The introduction does a marvelous job setting the stage. I especially enjoyed how you directed our attention to so many poets, composers, and artists, who were all deeply inspired by nature. In a world so full of technology these days, it is good to be reminded of the majesty around us, to breathe, to experience the beauty of nature. I fear we do indeed forget to take notice of the "joyous song of the robin" and the "magficent coloured coats of the butterflies."

Chapter two wonderfully weaves in the historical elements of the Saskatchewan homesteaders. I love it when a book takes me back to those who have gone before and teaches me something new from their perseverance and hard work.

It is obvious tremendous research has gone into this piece. It is very well-written, and your style flows smoothly. Mostly, though, it makes me want to venture outdoors and rejoice once again in the beauty around us! Giving you high stars and wishing you every success with this piece.

All the very best,
Faith Rose
Now To Him

faith rose wrote 769 days ago

Dear Julian,

You write with such passion! I read your first two chapters and truly felt your heart on these pages.

The introduction does a marvelous job setting the stage. I especially enjoyed how you directed our attention to so many poets, composers, and artists, who were all deeply inspired by nature. In a world so full of technology these days, it is good to be reminded of the majesty around us, to breathe, to experience the beauty of nature. I fear we do indeed forget to take notice of the "joyous song of the robin" and the "magficent coloured coats of the butterflies."

Chapter two wonderfully weaves in the historical elements of the Saskatchewan homesteaders. I love it when a book takes me back to those who have gone before and teaches me something new from their perseverance and hard work.

It is obvious tremendous research has gone into this piece. It is very well-written, and your style flows smoothly. Mostly, though, it makes me want to venture outdoors and rejoice once again in the beauty around us! Giving you high stars and wishing you every success with this piece.

All the very best,
Faith Rose
Now To Him

uncas wrote 770 days ago

Dear Shewta

Thank you for your kind comments, I am so glad that you got something from this. You have inspired me to post one more chapter (the one for children) as I believe you might enjoy it.

Kind regards,

J

Hi Julian,

I've just read through your introduction without a break. It instantly drew me in especially your style of narration - direct and original just as the natural world . Some of your sentences would make wonderful quotes for mankind to reflect on. Truly unique & beautiful! : )

Yes, you've put it aptly - humanity and our relationship with the natural world indeed builds our future and most importantly I think you've just aptly described the poor man. I've learnt so much from this one chapter and I intend to learn more by reading the rest.

It is indeed a book with a difference that will make for great reading. It not only makes us understand the nature around us better but also understand ourselves in how we can all be a part of this great journey called conservation.

Thank you for the wonderful read!
Shweta

Shweta wrote 770 days ago

Hi Julian,

I've just read through your introduction without a break. It instantly drew me in especially your style of narration - direct and original just as the natural world . Some of your sentences would make wonderful quotes for mankind to reflect on. Truly unique & beautiful! : )

Yes, you've put it aptly - humanity and our relationship with the natural world indeed builds our future and most importantly I think you've just aptly described the poor man. I've learnt so much from this one chapter and I intend to learn more by reading the rest.

It is indeed a book with a difference that will make for great reading. It not only makes us understand the nature around us better but also understand ourselves in how we can all be a part of this great journey called conservation.

Thank you for the wonderful read!
Shweta

uncas wrote 770 days ago

Hi Kirk,

Yes, looks very interesting indeed. There is quite a wide diversity reflected on Authonomy, I am new and just finding my way around - but am impressed with the talented submissions. By the way, did you have a chance to look at "In the Shadow of Inspiration"? This is quite different from most of the work listed here.
Best regards,
Uncas

Hi and welcome,
I hope you can get a chance to read parts of my college caper crime story that takes place at the Oktoberfest.
Thanks
Kirk
"How to Steal a Lion"

KirkH wrote 772 days ago

Hi and welcome,
I hope you can get a chance to read parts of my college caper crime story that takes place at the Oktoberfest.
Thanks
Kirk
"How to Steal a Lion"

uncas wrote 772 days ago

It will be interesting to see the response to this truly unique and beautiful book

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