Book Jacket

 

rank 622
word count 18908
date submitted 11.05.2012
date updated 17.06.2014
genres: Fiction, Literary Fiction, Thriller...
classification: adult
incomplete

Full Circle

Michael "hawk" Spisak

we are each our own devil and we make this world our hell

~Oscar Wilde

 

Full Circle is the untold story of the forgotten children of the Indigenous First Nations of North America. The story of the half-breed, the mix blood, the unaccepted.

Jackson Themal is one of these lost children. Raised in the foster care system, as a boy becoming a man he loathes what he is devolving into.

Jackson will learn of his heritage, of the traditions, ceremonies and culture of the Ancestors whose ancient knowledge beat a cacophony in his veins. With quiet desperation he seeks to belong, to live up to a gift he had no knowledge of given to him by a mother he never knew.

But what if there isn't anything left to return to? What if all that remains is a perversion of all that was? What effect will learning what he never wanted to know, about his People, about himself, have on this young man?

As historical fact paints a dark and bloody fictional tale Jackson will come to understand. Completing one circle while initiating another, his journey will end at the beginning and begin at the ending until what he becomes is what he has always been.

 
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tags

, american, native, sundance, vision

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33 comments

 

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godyzarc wrote 641 days ago


THE PROMISED LAND

For those of us who live on an Indian Reservation, in my case POW Camp # 322/Pine Ridge SD, the last thing any of us wants to do is read about it. How we are poor and alcoholic and forgotten. How the outside world views us as relics from the past, or how we are spiritual and one with the earth, or we are rich from casinos, or savages who need to be saved by the christians.

No thanks. We have to live it. Survive it every day. Don't need to read about it in anymore books usually written by white men. Or filmed by white men. People who come here twice a year and think they know.

So when Hawk sent me his book, Full Circle, I must admit it sat on my night stand for quite awhile. I really wanted to read it because he is a friend, but every night I would get into bed after a long day of rez life, see the cover, and cringe. "Ugh. I. Just. Can't." I just can't read another damn book full of misrepresentation and sorrow about Indians.

I should have known better. It is Hawk's writing. The introduction alone knocked me out of bed. Wow. Someone who gets it. Someone has finally written the truth.

So I began a journey of words written with such honesty and truth that I could not put it down. This is not just a book about the rez, or indians, or the lies told and lived by residents or visitors. This is a book about revenge. Or redemption, however you choose to look at it.

It is a book about right vs wrong. True history vs the lies and programming white america has been fed for over a century, in an effort to relieve it's collective guilt at what government and christianity has wrought with their greed and genocide. To entire races and cultures of indigenous people.

It is a book that exposes dime store ''medicine men'' who sell ceremony but also explains why, neither condoning nor condemning. It exposes the true hearts of those lost, new age, mostly white, mostly well off soul searchers who come here every summer (never in the winter mind you) feeding off of a culture and spirituality that is long dead to most. They come, they take, they leave. Same old cavalry.

Ah, but the true culture and spirituality is not dead. There are still real medicine men up in the hills. Up that dirt road without a sign. But Betsy and Johnny will never find them. Hawk did. Jackson Themal, the protagonist in the book did. When you find a true Grandma or Grandpa, who has the power and the knowledge of the Ancients, you find a strength and wisdom that lives in your heart and soul forever.

But back to the main theme of the book: Revenge & Redemption. The main character, Jackson, has given his body and mind to the Ancestors, the true meaning of prayer and Lakota Spirituality. Only to be knocked down off that Sundance tree by something else: Greed. The very thing that knocked all Indigenous Peoples from their way of life on this continent.

The author writes about life on and off the rez thru the voice of a half breed in the modern world. Never before has any writer or film maker gotten it so right. So damn right. So honest and true. The struggle of believing, of KNOWING, that this land and this way of life is right, is in your heart, always was and always will be, but the world, indian and non indian, keeps trying to knock it out of you.

He blames religion. He blames the government. He blames a society that is brainwashed by government and religion. He blames plastic medicine men. He blames new age lost soul seekers. He blames himself. Then, he does something about it. He goes on a journey so frightful and dark that the reader cannot help but stay in the car instead of flinging open the passenger side door and jumping out. No, we are all accomplices in this crime. There is no getting out of that car. Not until all the wrongs have been put right. And at the end of the journey, it is the reader, the passenger, that must decide if they have been put right. Revenge or Redemption? You decide.

In true Lakota spirituality, what is above is below. What we do here we do up there. We have another one of us up there sending us what we send them. Prayers, thoughts, actions. Those up there can help us. Jackson's whole life was a prayer. I cannot help but think what he did was right and just. And supported. All is fair in love and war.

This is a dangerous book written by a man who has nothing to lose, who only speaks the truth, and I commend this new voice that dares to speak out.

Lila was'te Hawk. Wopila Tanka.
Hecatuyelo
Jim
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
American POW Camp # 322

godyzarc wrote 689 days ago

Full Circle, September 7, 2012
By Matthew Black Eagle Man
This review is from: Full Circle (Paperback Edition)
ISBN-13: 978-0984708796

"Full Circle is powerfully intriguing. A story from a perspective of a native growing up away from his people and the rejection he receives from his people because of that. This story says a lot in a real and true way about the concept of your family history being born in you and linked to your DNA. Not just in a good way, but in all ways. A topic that could be spoken about forever.

What really pulled at me was I was remembering a time when I went to a powwow and a white mother ** wanted to charge me money to sit and sing and dance with my relatives. My wife and I had to drive away and I was so burning with anger, tears running down my face, I told my wife I wanted to find a white guy and kill him. Any one would do, and when I got done with that, I wanted to find another white guy and kill him and if I wasn't satisfied, I wanted to do it again. Later, I felt bad for these emotions, but now I realize even tho I grew up away from the rez, of which I am very glad, the anger and hatred that's perpetuated on the reservation still burned in me. Your book helped me to be aware of that. I imagine all native people have prob had thoughts that go in the direction that this book went, and I am proud to say that with finding the roots of our spiritual lives and my spiritual self, I don't have to live with that anger and frustration anymore. You did an awesome job. Fantastic. Bringing to light so much that is real without tapping into what is truly real - the spirituality that was given to our people. I started the book not liking you. I finished the book saying I can't wait to meet this guy. Take care."

~Matthew Black Eagle Man

Eliza Moon wrote 165 days ago

Full Circle.
Chapter 1.

Wow. This is a full on full force brief history of the taking of America, from an Indian's point of view. Some of which I knew, and some of which I didn't, but the whole chapter hit me and really made me think. I am likely to descend into merely a list of quotes. Starting with this one, 'The price may be your soul, at a minimum, your mind. Once the wizard is seen he can never be unseen, the truth, never to be unknown.'

The 'Discovery' of America is, as you infer, a curious expression. It was already there, it's 'paradise' already discovered by the indigenous people. 'Well'...'Not really people, but bipedal creatures that attempted to speak.'

'A new vengeful Entity'
'All bowed before this new Emperor or suffered his wrath'
'Hell was concocted'

But hell was not just concocted, it was not just invented as a tool to keep people subservient. Hell became reality, it became a way of life. 'allotted portions of land' 'such a display of generosity' 'The Trail of Tears'

I love the line, 'they crossed a bridge of ice and somehow found their way to this land of milk and honey.'

And this one near the end of the chapter is particularly powerful, 'We are only killing you because we want to help you.'

Watchlisted. Full stars. I would appreciate it if you would like to take a quick look at mine in return. x

CanteNagiTehila wrote 481 days ago

This book is honest, gritty, not for faint of heart but comes from the heart. Finally someone who knows has written the truth of the way it is.

CanteNagiTehila

godyzarc wrote 484 days ago

congratulations to Carl Ginger, winner of the autographed copy of Full Circle, The End of the Beginning.

(http://www.goodreads.com/user/show/4309946-carl)

Thank you, to everyone who entered. 713 people. Wow! You can purchase Full Circle at Amazon as Kindle for $6.99 and Word Branch (http://wordbranch.com/full-circle.html) as paperback for $14.99. If you have a copy or when you acquire a copy and you would like it signed, mail it to me, (with return postage paid please, about $5.00) and I will sign it for you and return it. Again, thank you, everybody. Certainly a successful giveaway!

ShirleyGrace wrote 556 days ago

I enjoyed reading your work. What we are taught in school about the Native American (when it is taught) is a slanted truth. The loss of land, a way of life and a heritage. Read chapter one of "Menagerie." It is on this site.
It tells of the "Trail of Tears." This book is full of grit and guts. Some of it I did not fully understand but enough to realize what the people have gone through or at least some of it. High stars from me.
ShirleyGrace
The Devil's Stepchild

Isabella79 wrote 594 days ago

I've been a fan of Native American culture since i was very young and i believe i have in my collection, every movie that was ever made about the natives of this country. I believe Full Circle would make a colossal addition to my collection, so i hope the right people will take note of it, soon.
Six stars and on my shelf.
Best,
Isabella

LCF Quartet wrote 613 days ago

Hi Hawk,
It was a pleasure reading the first two chapters of Full Circle! Your descriptions are authentic and I liked the way you provided back-story about the plot (which was sufficient for the beginning) and your characters are reflected in a visual sense.

I'd tighten the sentence below a bit, to make it more spicy though;
Jackson, a ruggedly handsome man in his late twenties, has orange-brown eyes, and dark brown, straight hair to his waist.

You've introduced Jackson (MC), Nate, David, and Roddy in a professional style and I loved your remarkable descriptions. Your writing style certainly delivers.

Your dialogue scenes are in a good shape and believable. What I liked most is the historical glimpse you provided on Native American culture, and you did it in such a nice way, at the same time proving your story-telling skills. The Sundance concept behind the book is superb.

I look forward to reading more to see where the story is going and how things will unfold.
6/6 stars from me to you and best wishes.
Lucette- Ten Deep Footprints

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 641 days ago

Rivetting from the first paragraph. This is an important book as it sheds light into dark and deliberately obscured corners. The mixture of fact and fiction is used as a tool to make the reader think and engage with their own knowledge of history and discover the flaws. Coming back to read more and hoping to buy a complete copy soon.

Kenneth Edward Lim wrote 641 days ago

Hawk,
I read from the Sundance ceremony to the antics of Junior Rutledge and must admit this is a world I had barely an inkling of. Certainlly the First Nations from my National Geographic exposure, have always been a fascinating subject, but getting to the underbelly presented a different picture. Your straightforward narrative style is easy on the eye and digestion, your attention to detail amazing. Thank you so much for sharing.

Kenneth Edward Lim
The North Korean

godyzarc wrote 641 days ago


THE PROMISED LAND

For those of us who live on an Indian Reservation, in my case POW Camp # 322/Pine Ridge SD, the last thing any of us wants to do is read about it. How we are poor and alcoholic and forgotten. How the outside world views us as relics from the past, or how we are spiritual and one with the earth, or we are rich from casinos, or savages who need to be saved by the christians.

No thanks. We have to live it. Survive it every day. Don't need to read about it in anymore books usually written by white men. Or filmed by white men. People who come here twice a year and think they know.

So when Hawk sent me his book, Full Circle, I must admit it sat on my night stand for quite awhile. I really wanted to read it because he is a friend, but every night I would get into bed after a long day of rez life, see the cover, and cringe. "Ugh. I. Just. Can't." I just can't read another damn book full of misrepresentation and sorrow about Indians.

I should have known better. It is Hawk's writing. The introduction alone knocked me out of bed. Wow. Someone who gets it. Someone has finally written the truth.

So I began a journey of words written with such honesty and truth that I could not put it down. This is not just a book about the rez, or indians, or the lies told and lived by residents or visitors. This is a book about revenge. Or redemption, however you choose to look at it.

It is a book about right vs wrong. True history vs the lies and programming white america has been fed for over a century, in an effort to relieve it's collective guilt at what government and christianity has wrought with their greed and genocide. To entire races and cultures of indigenous people.

It is a book that exposes dime store ''medicine men'' who sell ceremony but also explains why, neither condoning nor condemning. It exposes the true hearts of those lost, new age, mostly white, mostly well off soul searchers who come here every summer (never in the winter mind you) feeding off of a culture and spirituality that is long dead to most. They come, they take, they leave. Same old cavalry.

Ah, but the true culture and spirituality is not dead. There are still real medicine men up in the hills. Up that dirt road without a sign. But Betsy and Johnny will never find them. Hawk did. Jackson Themal, the protagonist in the book did. When you find a true Grandma or Grandpa, who has the power and the knowledge of the Ancients, you find a strength and wisdom that lives in your heart and soul forever.

But back to the main theme of the book: Revenge & Redemption. The main character, Jackson, has given his body and mind to the Ancestors, the true meaning of prayer and Lakota Spirituality. Only to be knocked down off that Sundance tree by something else: Greed. The very thing that knocked all Indigenous Peoples from their way of life on this continent.

The author writes about life on and off the rez thru the voice of a half breed in the modern world. Never before has any writer or film maker gotten it so right. So damn right. So honest and true. The struggle of believing, of KNOWING, that this land and this way of life is right, is in your heart, always was and always will be, but the world, indian and non indian, keeps trying to knock it out of you.

He blames religion. He blames the government. He blames a society that is brainwashed by government and religion. He blames plastic medicine men. He blames new age lost soul seekers. He blames himself. Then, he does something about it. He goes on a journey so frightful and dark that the reader cannot help but stay in the car instead of flinging open the passenger side door and jumping out. No, we are all accomplices in this crime. There is no getting out of that car. Not until all the wrongs have been put right. And at the end of the journey, it is the reader, the passenger, that must decide if they have been put right. Revenge or Redemption? You decide.

In true Lakota spirituality, what is above is below. What we do here we do up there. We have another one of us up there sending us what we send them. Prayers, thoughts, actions. Those up there can help us. Jackson's whole life was a prayer. I cannot help but think what he did was right and just. And supported. All is fair in love and war.

This is a dangerous book written by a man who has nothing to lose, who only speaks the truth, and I commend this new voice that dares to speak out.

Lila was'te Hawk. Wopila Tanka.
Hecatuyelo
Jim
Pine Ridge Indian Reservation
American POW Camp # 322

EHarkin wrote 644 days ago

Putting this on my watchlist. It is well told and leaves you wanting to read more

godyzarc wrote 677 days ago

Full Circle, September 19, 2012
By Lynny Prince, Scattered Leaves, The Legend of Ghostkiller
This review is from: Full Circle (Paperback Edition)

Full Circle is an excellent book. An intimate look into a culture that the majority of the population would never have the privilege to learn about otherwise. It is raw, an open wound, with the perfect blend of fact and fiction. It does contains graphic violence that is not suitable for everyone. All in all, it is an eye opener for anyone who has a "Dances With Wolves" mentality regarding Native American culture. Two thumbs up. ~LP

Su Dan wrote 689 days ago

fascinating book- relayed with skill to create an excellent book...
backed
read SEASONS...

godyzarc wrote 689 days ago

Full Circle, September 7, 2012
By Matthew Black Eagle Man
This review is from: Full Circle (Paperback Edition)
ISBN-13: 978-0984708796

"Full Circle is powerfully intriguing. A story from a perspective of a native growing up away from his people and the rejection he receives from his people because of that. This story says a lot in a real and true way about the concept of your family history being born in you and linked to your DNA. Not just in a good way, but in all ways. A topic that could be spoken about forever.

What really pulled at me was I was remembering a time when I went to a powwow and a white mother ** wanted to charge me money to sit and sing and dance with my relatives. My wife and I had to drive away and I was so burning with anger, tears running down my face, I told my wife I wanted to find a white guy and kill him. Any one would do, and when I got done with that, I wanted to find another white guy and kill him and if I wasn't satisfied, I wanted to do it again. Later, I felt bad for these emotions, but now I realize even tho I grew up away from the rez, of which I am very glad, the anger and hatred that's perpetuated on the reservation still burned in me. Your book helped me to be aware of that. I imagine all native people have prob had thoughts that go in the direction that this book went, and I am proud to say that with finding the roots of our spiritual lives and my spiritual self, I don't have to live with that anger and frustration anymore. You did an awesome job. Fantastic. Bringing to light so much that is real without tapping into what is truly real - the spirituality that was given to our people. I started the book not liking you. I finished the book saying I can't wait to meet this guy. Take care."

~Matthew Black Eagle Man

Mushiegirl wrote 690 days ago

Ordered the book from Amazon for many reasons including wanting to know how Jackson fares....as well as the others. Am glad I managed to find this one. I seem to stumble a lot on this site on finding some real gems.

Anyway, I do have a question though, curious being that I am. I had some interesting experiences awhile ago and I have been asking not only my own relatives but others as well - what is your belief on spirit walking, or soul traveling?

Mushie

Isabel Hanson wrote 691 days ago

I like your book. I will read some more.

Mushiegirl wrote 700 days ago

What a great introduction to Jackson and this whole story I thank you for that.....will you upload more chapters?

Hint Hint....I know what you're thinking :)

Mushie

Mushiegirl wrote 702 days ago

The history as backdrop to this chapter, words you use accurately portray life and hardship on Pine Ridge, yet still home for those living there - I know with my father he made it home for my brother and I even though times were so hard. I have some fond memories. But I too know what it did to my brother, having old clothes with holes in them, how, as he got older, a gang wanted to recruit him for he was quiet, yet with a keen intelligence...

The Stronghold Table, I was there ages ago, and had the most interesting experience that I won't ever forget and led me down my own path, learning of spirit walking.

Can't wait to read of Mary Bloody Heart and Jackson's mother.

Mushie

Mushiegirl wrote 702 days ago

Chapter 2, oh yes Jackson definitely reminds me of someone I know, love it :)

Well written, attention to detail of characters, places and things. Dialogue gritty but authentic, really makes me think, thank you for that. Fictional, yes, but also very real.

Have you been to Pine Ridge and Rosebud Reservations? How long ago? My brother left it although our father never did, as well as some of my other friends and family.

Mushie


Mushiegirl wrote 702 days ago

I love this first chapter - not only because of the details and descriptions, but Jackson is a character I quite like - I think it is because he reminds me of a couple of my own relatives. Ceremonies are so a part of way of life that I am glad you started off with one. :)

Count me on reading more of this book, it's one that excites me to see here.

Mushie

Tod Schneider wrote 704 days ago

You do a wonderful job of bringing this story to life, mixing fine cultural details with very human interactions and good humor. Your writing flows nicely, and your voice has a nice rhythm to it. Best of luck with this!
Tod
http://authonomy.com/books/40646/the-lost-wink/

scargirl wrote 752 days ago

laid out nicely. you could tighten up the punctuation and the long pitch. and why all the caps in the quotation?
j
what every woman should know

Keith Gilbey wrote 754 days ago

Michael,

Too bad the 'ghost dance' didn't turn out to be the truth. I think there is truth and pain here - part history, part biography, part story - please keep going.

Keith Gilbey
Peppermint

rubicon779 wrote 759 days ago

I took Full Circle to be at it's core an effort to explore the question "has the world already ended and is this hell?" Spisak reveals a world many may know only from "Dances with Wolves" or Indian casinos for the twisted reality that it really is, and paints a grim outlook for how to address such a state of affairs. He writes with passion, candor, and honest perspective.

R. Dango wrote 773 days ago

This is an interesting story, and I feel I should have one copy in my (real) book self.
However, I think some description in chapter 1 is a little bit too technical to place it right up in front. For example, the description of the rope thing in the para starting with 'As laughter erupts' made me read it twice to understand the procedure. I may be thick but surely I am not the only one, and you'd like those rather thick readers to buy the book as well.
On the other hand, the first para of chapter 2 describing Jackson is an easy and attractive read and it might be better to place it in chapter 1?
Read 2 chapters and keeping it in my WL.
R.Dango
The Forest of Vulcanus

Adam Thurstman wrote 774 days ago

This is powerful stuff, I read chapeter 1 and could literally feel my eye's opening at your excellent descriptions of emotional and physical pain, however, and I have to agree with what Dianne says about trying to understand the uniqueness of these ceremonies and all the various actions and impliments. I think it would be well worth explaining these in lay man terms, as one read through, as to what's going on and why, just for the uninitiated, as most of us are. I wish you all the very best with this. I have a feeling it's going to do well hear.

Thanks for you support
Adam De-Thurstman
IS ISRAEL REAL

Wanttobeawriter wrote 783 days ago

FULL CIRCLE
This is an interesting story. I like the way you begin with the explanation of what makes a full circle. Overall, the way you infuse the importance and rules of the dance makes this a very unique story. Made me feel as if I were walking (or dancing) into a world foreign from mine. Aside from the feel you’re sharing “inside” information by writing this, is your writing style; it’s clear and easy to follow. Makes this a good read. Highly starred and added to my shelf. Wanttobeawriter: Who Killed the President?

Cara Gold wrote 788 days ago

{Full Circle} – Michael “hawk” Spisak

You had me intrigued from your pitch, and I eagerly tumbled into the story. In chapter one you establish the character of Jackson well, and provide nice background. I like the reflections in memory, and particularly, I think you handle the ‘present’ voice well, although I’m not a huge fan of this style it was nonetheless engaging.

I liked how in chapter two we were given more historical background, and I can feel your heritage emerging in your story. You tell it raw and powerfully, an honest voice, I like the way you invite us in.

Chapter three, very culturally vivid, with some amazing descriptions. Particularly, the pain… ‘Mind searing lightning bolts of raw pain in his back. Blinding white explosions as every nerve screams in torturous agony.’ You made me feel this pain, and you captured my senses.

Thank you so much for sharing, I look forward to reading on! Have a fabulous day :)
Cara

p.s.
I made some detailed editorial suggestions in thanks for your support of ‘Dawn of Destruction’, if you want to get in touch via email! (goldcara6@gmail.com)

Eileen Kay wrote 789 days ago


This is a topic that grabbed my attention right away, and seriously. This particular character has been driven to then end of his tether, and there is tension and suspense in the pitch, as well as the mention of visitons and ancetral ghosts.

Personally I would not use the word “pissed” in the pitch - I assume you use the American meaning of being angry. In British slang, this means to be drunk and happy, and many non-Americans will misunderstand you. I’d switch that one, just for the jacket blurb.

In general, I admire the seriousness of tone. I like how descriptive and informative it is. It's gripping and dramatic.

It’s a relief and is very refreshing that visions are addressed early in the story, in a totally normal way and not anything to be explained or rationalised. It is excellent to hear about a culture where this is part of life.

The style of narration is also witty and sarcastic at times, and that’s a good thing too, especially with the weighty and painful topics. Some of the physical pain described is chilling.

I only ever read one chapter of each author on this website, usually. Here though, I may come back and read some more. I appreciate that you giving me glimpse into a world I’d never hear about otherwise. It’s a fascinating story.

Best of luck with this, from
Eileen Kardos

rootintootin wrote 795 days ago

I love what I have read so far, cant wait to get the book. It is a story that needs to be heard by many. From the ten chapters I have read, It would make one helluva movie. I couldnt quit reading until I read it all, very interesting just I thought it would be. I must get this book.

Ruthie Mitchell

godyzarc wrote 803 days ago
Dianna Lanser wrote 805 days ago

Hi Hawk,

Thank you for sharing what I assume is your own story in disguise. What you wrote was certainly eye-opening. Although I found the first chapter really interesting, I didn’t totally understand it. I wanted to know the purpose of the dance. I wanted to know if the dance was actually a dance like I’ve seen in movies or if it is a quiet, personal, spiritual reckoning - a coming to terms with your purpose through a test of self-will and strength. I was trying to understand how the pegs are imbedded under the skin. And what keeps them from falling out? I guess there was just a little confusion there.

As I read chapter two I found myself feeling ashamed that I am white. Somehow I feel I owe you an apology for what my ancestors did to your people. Thank you for sharing the history of that horrible, bloody massacre at Wounded Knee. The whole tragic incident really makes me sick. I hope you’ll forgive me for how I refer to it in my book (chapter 17/16). I only mean to bring about unity amongst the races.

You have a nice cliff-hanger at the end of chapter two, but you don’t address it. I really wanted to know what happened between Mary and Jackson’s mom. You do leave another cliff-hanger referencing that night at the end of chapter three but you didn’t upload any more of your book! Butmmer! You have me hooked!

Hawk, I think you are doing a wonderful thing and I commend you for it. I hope you will find a peaceful place in this crazy mixed up world as you try to gain back some of the honor that the First Nations people so richly deserve. Six stars and a backing!

Dianna Lanser
Nothing But The Blood

I only found one easy fix. Good job with the editing.!
Chapter three - “Their (They’re) only Indians, so who cares?“

P.S. If you happen to read the end of my book before I talk with you, the last chapter kind of mirror’s Spc. Brett Lundstrom’s funeral that was held at the Pine Ridge Reservation in 2006. I only mean to bring honor to the Oglala Sioux for the sacrifices they have made in the service of their country.

celticwriter wrote 806 days ago

Cool, Hawk, very cool. Loved your profile. Loved your synopsis. Enjoying your journey. Very visual, make a wonderful movie! :-) Looking forward to reading all. Nice, interesting, fascinating.

Joy and blessings,
Jim
London in Love

KitKat7 wrote 808 days ago

Hello, Hawk:

I have just finished reading the first chapter of your work. For the right audience, this is a story that needs to be told,. Your attention to the small details is exciting because they paint such clear pictures of Jackson. But I think more importantly, these small details allow us to see into the mind of Jackson. That is crucial to understanding his character, and hence your story. I will continue reading to see where you take us on this journey with Jackson. And, for now, I will place it on my watch list.

Ashara (Like Corns on My Toes)

1