Book Jacket

 

rank 51
word count 17670
date submitted 28.06.2012
date updated 28.11.2012
genres: Non-fiction, Harper True Life, Crim...
classification: moderate
incomplete

The Case of the Drowning Men

Eponymous Rox

Investigating the Smiley Face Serial Murder Theory [as featured on NBC and in CRIME MAGAZINE]

 

The police are calling them accidents. They say young men are simply drinking too much and meeting a tragic end in icy lakes and rivers. But, with sinister graffiti frequently found near where the victims died, the public thinks something else has been going on in America's northland since 1997. They're calling the sudden disappearances of hundreds of college-age men mysterious. They're calling the drownings murder.

THE CASE OF THE DROWNING MEN: a true crime investigation into the 'Smiley Face' serial killings.

"The first thing that jumped out at me was the victimological profile...the standard deviation is only 0.4 on their weight and height." -- Dr. Lee Gilbertson, gang specialist and Criminal Justice professor

"The statistics are so stacked against this number of young men found in bodies of water in that cluster of states within that period of time." -- Dr. Cyril Wecht, forensic pathologist

"The probability is virtually zero that five intoxicated students just happened to walk similar or even different routes and end up on the riverbank." -- Dr. Maurice Godwin, criminal investigative psychologist


*NOTE: This upload now contains previews of additional true crime titles in this series

 
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tags

conspiracy theories, drowning, forensic pathology, murder, nonfiction, serial killers, smiley face murders, true crime

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Eponymous Rox wrote 611 days ago


NOTE: This upload was modified on November 28th to include previews of additional works from this series. All ye true crime buffs, please visit www.KillingKillers.blogspot.com to find complete titles and to read other crime stuff for FREE.

AGAIN: I want to thank everyone here who has backed and continues to back THE CASE OF THE DROWNING MEN as well as those who provide me feedback on it. Authonomy's site is still sooooooo slooooooooow (and wonky) that I do believe sending thank-you notes via snail mail might get to you all faster than individually messaging at this time!

E.R.
https://www.amazon.com/author/eponymous + http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/eponymous-rox

Next up in my case queue: KIDS KILLING KIDS explores youth-on-youth violence and its relationship to the media and features famous child killers Leopold and Loeb, Hulme and Parker, Mary Bell, Wyley Gates, Venables and Thompson, Harris and Klebold, Alyssa Bustamente, and Austin Reed Sigg.

Also in the works: THE 'PREPPIE KILLER' a biography of the black-hearted career criminal Robert Chambers.

(and more--always more--so stay tuned.)


Annette Russell wrote 651 days ago

Highly disturbing, thoroughly researched and extremely well-written, I read all five uploaded chapters with fascination and horror. Chapter 2: Anatomy of a Drowning, so stark and clinical in style, is definitely not for the squeamish. I read it with one eye squeezed tightly shut - and yet I've learned so much.

Backed, even though I'll probably have nightmares for a long time to come.

Best wishes,

Annette

Eponymous Rox wrote 653 days ago

I like what I read so far. What do you think of Gilbertsons theories? I don't buy it at all. especially the east west , stuff etc. Not that I don't think there could be a killer. Or what about Jenkins with his arms crossed just like the indian statue in LaCrosse or Todd geib found standing in the water? I have been following these cases. I would have sent you a lot of info if I knew someone was doing a book. I think these stories need to be told.



Well, Gilbertson specializes in gang psychology and criminology, and the concept of these being organized gang killings is an integral part of the ‘Smiley Face’ serial killer theory, as it stands today. Thus Gilbertson’s apparent slant.

But it’s wholly understandable why a gang of killers is suspected here, and, since you’re already familiar with this matter, then I’ll point to the virtually simultaneous disappearances and deaths in January 2010 of McCurry (Wisconsin), Peterson (Minnesota) and Lacina (Iowa) as the type of *evidence* that serves to bolster this widely-held supposition.

There have, of course, been a number of other cases like those occurring on the exact day within a large swath of territory, much too large for just one killer to accomplish in only a few short hours, obviously. For instance, Todd Geib and Josh Snell, who each placed a distress call to their friends minutes before they went missing, vanished the same night in different locations under identically suspicious circumstances. (I do in fact provide an overview of Geib’s case in chapter eight, “Gradual But Not Swift Moving”. Note that former NY State District Attorney Trish DeAngelis is still pursuing a resolution of that Michigan drowning, on behalf of the victim’s family, striving to get his 'accidental' demise upgraded to a homicide and once more actively investigated.)

Now, whether all of these fatalities are mishaps or they’re murders—you’ll have to read on to see my own conclusions—I’ll say only that any non-recreational drowning is a statistical improbability and therefore highly suspicious. Accordingly, all missing-person events that present this possible scenario from the outset should be treated as such by law enforcement immediately,. Water rapidly destroys a wide array of evidence, even small wounds or punctures, so waiting days before launching a search for a possible victim of foul play is just bad police work.

Last, you reference the Jenkins drowning which was upgraded fairly recently to homicide: Yes, I cover that case too in chapter five titled “Cowboys and Indians”. To be frank, however, it was difficult to find a strong “Native American Connection” in these deaths as a grouping, let alone that indications of ritual murder were absent on most, if not all, of the victims’ bodies. It’s also important to acknowledge that this particular region is saturated with Native American artifacts and influences, both ancient and modern day, so here the role of chance or coincidence had to be considered when assessing or rejecting the likelihood of any sacrificial aspect to the ‘Smiley Face’ drownings.

I’m pleased you enjoyed what you’ve read so far. I’m planning a follow up to this current report that’ll include an analysis of the newest cases from 2012. Just a few of these that you may have heard about and which I’m currently tracking, and/or waiting on autopsy and toxicology reports for, are: Tom Hecht, Franco Garcia, Eric Duffey, Nathan Bihlmaier, and, still missing but presumed *drowned*, pre-med student Colin Gillis.

E.R.
http://KillingKillers.blogspot.com


Richard Allen wrote 657 days ago

Well-written and a fascinating read, but not for the faint of heart. Some of the illustrations are available from Amazon through their inside-the-book option if you are not quite ready to buy the book.

trevca wrote 653 days ago

This is a fantastic piece, bleak as the subject may actually be. There has always been a quite morbid and macaber fascination with murder and conspiracy that will doubtless lend rather a large readership to this beautifully written and well documented work. True crime always finds a niche that fiction can never sate and needless to say, (I have to admit) I too will today, as a result of this reading, be forced to search the web for the smiley face murders. It is just too blatantly luscious and mouthwatering an abominable issue to simply let go without delving some more into it. This is highly addictive, and the artist takes time to paint in the skies and surrounds before showing the ugliness that is perpetrated by man in what appears to be amongst the few shangri la's on earth.

I'm hooked, you can slack the line now, I'm coming in of my own accord, net not required.

What a ride!

Trev

BarbShaya wrote 72 days ago

Wow - very compelling - well written - I wanted more and was bummed when you moved onto excerpts from other works.
Couple suggestions: Your opening sentence runs on and on - way too long. You will have more impact if you shorten in.
Final sentence in first chapter - 'plagueing' perhaps change to 'nagging' or some other word - plague doesn't seem fitting.
Chapter two was sooo much more detail than I ever thought I wanted about drowing and I could not stop reading it. Really fantastic.
Hope to see this make it further -

Regards,
Barb (Not Really Gone)

Lighter wrote 255 days ago

Drowning Men
I read all 6 chapters of this that are posted. And found it extremely interesting reading. I've never read drowning described in such detail as you describe in chapter 2. The stories that followed that are both heart breaking and frightening. And were enough to convince me alcohol is not the problem here. You're doing a real service by promoting this. Hope you catch some law enforcement attention soon.

Rasputin Rastov wrote 355 days ago

Hi
This is a great read, well researched and intelligently written, I have read the first ch, will return later to read more.
Ras

MC Storm wrote 402 days ago

I've read all chapters uploaded here. It is well written without going into gruesome details. I'm more interested in what makes the mind tick and you have displayed this very well. It's fascinating.
Mc
Exposed

Sheena Macleod wrote 412 days ago

Eponymous, I have read through your excellent introduction and will read the rest of "The Case of the Drowning Men" on e-book. This is an extremely insightful, well researched and wriitten account. The dissapearances and subsequent bodies is intriguing. I want to know more.

Well done for giving these victims a voice.

Sheena

The Popish Plot

wordworker wrote 417 days ago

I came to this book expecting a book-length treatment of a specific crime and instead I find a group of chapters, each with it's own murder or scholarly treatise on the previously recounted crime. I enjoy "short-story"-type true crime, but it needs to be better clarified that that is what THIS is.
I will keep you on my shelf because you do excellent work and you deserve to be read but you really need to clarify in your Long Pitch (and probably in your title as well) that this is a compilation of crimes.

wordworker wrote 417 days ago

I have to admit ... I'm lost. What happened to the river drownings? Why are we suddenly thrust into the middle of a completely different crime? I'm going to look at chapter four but if it's a confusing as chapter three, I'm not going any further with this.

wordworker wrote 417 days ago

Wow! Very thorough picture of a drowning! I can't say I enjoyed this chapter but it was VERY well written and impressive in the amount of research.
I would suggest that whenever you use the phrase "drown victim" you change drown to drownING ... that's the traditional usage.

wordworker wrote 424 days ago

Excellent beginning! Echoes of Ann Rule. You've hooked me.

Andrea Taylor wrote 437 days ago

This may be non-fiction but it is beautifully written. It could so easily get bogged down in facts and statistics, but it doesn't. You create a fascinating and intriguing scenario, making it effortlessly easy to keep reading, even though they are harrowing tales. Brilliantly crafted.
Andrea
The de Amerley Affair

Cathy Hardy wrote 468 days ago

I keep coming back to your book. It is beautifully crafted and cetainly gives me the willies, which is good!! :) Best of luck with it!!

Cathy

Manston wrote 500 days ago

I was absorbed reading these awful stories about what happened to these young men. I think this needs to be published so it can be a warning to people around the world. Sometimes I think we are all too trusting. Good Luck with this book I am sure it is destined for the top.
Excellent !
Manston

Kirrily Whatman wrote 531 days ago

Cannot wait to read more. Already backed and will rate highly. Gripping stuff.

tarasimone wrote 542 days ago

Am almost ready to read this book. Just wondering if you're interested in nit picking editing type comments, or just a general overview?

SleuthSayers wrote 556 days ago

Nicely done!

Tonya A. wrote 560 days ago

One word: Scaaarry. :) On my shelf for a spin. ;) Wouldn't let my sixth graders read... but hey, this my shelf right? :)

Mo1969 wrote 561 days ago

Capably organized, well thought out, and effectively written. I love reading a story that needs to be told, and this is definitely one that needs to be told. Thank you for undertaking the challenge. I especially like the juxtaposition of the quotes from the investigation and the newspaper accounts with the narrative.

Wellbro-writer wrote 562 days ago

I love this kind of story, read some, backed, will be back.
Highly Recommended

FRAN MACILVEY wrote 570 days ago

Dear ER

Though not a "true crime" buff, I took a look at your book, because it is doing very well. I'm not sure what I expected to find, but overall, I was quite impressed. You marshall your facts and the dead straight delivery adds a certain credibility.

There is also the conversational tone, which makes the reading easier, though the facts are grim. You have a way of offering a gentle parody, making it clear that, for example, several drownings in one spot in the same circumstances can hardly be written off as coincidence......

All the best with this. Somehow, I know it will do well.

Fran XX :)

Nawnie wrote 576 days ago

Hi I am new to authonomy (I have not even sorted my profile yet) yours is the first book (chapters up loaded) I have read. I enjoyed the few chapters available. Thanks for a great if somewhat macabre read.

Kathie Bondar wrote 580 days ago

Books like yours light the fire of truth and justice in me. I am backing you and placed it on my book shelf.
My work is with telepathy, and as I became aware of a string of deaths, all declared suicides, I tuned in telepathicaly to see the truth for myself. and what I found was ugly. The same suicide investigator's report in all cases. Truly, telepathy can be an amezing investigative tool. You should learn it, you would use it well.
Kathie Bondar

Elaine Chaika wrote 591 days ago

I'm so into this, and bam! It's over. Oh, I'll go to the suggested websites, but I'm confused about Authonomy. Do they usually present only fragments of a book? Or, the entire book? What's the point of uploading your work to it, if only a small portion is available?

Jane Mauret wrote 591 days ago

Hello, ER
Just to say how much I enjoyed the chapters that are loaded here.
It certainly is a fascinating mystery, what with so many young men disappearing.
It very well-written for even though it is crime non-fiction, the writing still has to entice.
Also very interesting to hear the narrator’s personal knowledge of the area, etc.
One wonders though how so many people going missing has not sent up some "red flags" earlier.
I think I have watched too many "Criminal Minds" episodes where they start tracking the UnSub after only 2 or 3 similar cases!
I have backed the book.
Jane Mauret
UGLY IN PARADISE

Elaine Chaika wrote 591 days ago

Honestly admitting that this case has not yielded the murderers is a plus. Many murders go unsolved. That's reality. Still, the details of the corpse's condition and the thinking of the police make a good read and allow the reader to try to crack the case on his or her own

Elaine Chaika

Elaine Chaika wrote 591 days ago

I know this terrain well, and it is as beautiful as he claims. The contrast of beauty and terrifying murder works wonderfully
Elaine Chaika

Elaine Chaika wrote 591 days ago

The intensely detailed description of drowning victims is superb, as is the author's care in telling us what evidence means what. At first, I thought this would tell me more than I would ever want to know about the details of drowning, but it grabbed my attention and fixed it on this case. The change of tone from clinical to narrative in Chapter 2, lured me in further. Although I rarely read about murders and police matters, I can't wait for the investigation to begin. Bravo

Elaine Chaika

books in taita wrote 592 days ago

Hi Eponymous, I think your book is a great read and exposition of an interesting theory. Terrific research, especially the details of drowning. I'm happy to back your book and I'll look forward to reading it in full. Thanks.

Lynne Heffner Ferrante wrote 592 days ago

I have finally managed to read your book and I am beyond impressed. Your research, compilation of facts, analysis and writing are superlative. As a former paralegal working in all levels of law here in New York I am extremely familiar with the presentation of facts as well as the preparation of these facts to fit ans support a thesis. In all of this you have exceeded any possible expectations, and I am duly impressed. All that said, the actual story is fascinating and compelling and you have done it full service. Your writing style is crisp and clear and your presentation of the facts is precise and compelling. I am backing you and giving you six stars, none of which you will need because this is an all time winner and best seller. Thank you for an exciting and informative read.
Lynne Heffner Ferrante
An Untenable Fragrance of Violets

hockgtjoa wrote 599 days ago

This is very absorbing even though I think there are some spots of difficulties in the writing. But the story itself is compelling. Some TV series have been built around studies of the victims; I had never before encountered a true crime treatment in writing that deals with this. I think I may back this next month.

Jesselowe wrote 599 days ago

Dear E.R.:
I bumped my own offering off to make room for "The Case of the Drowning Men," What more can I say? The pitch tweaked my interest, and the first paragrah grabbed me. I've only read the first chapter, but I'm hooked. I'm sure you've read the book "Torso," which is about the Torso murders that occurred in Cincinnati in the 1930's. The officials of that time refused to believe in a serial killer, and consequently one was never found. This book strongly reminds me of that same attitude of denial. Anyway, I'll continue to read and lose sleep. Jesselowe

Jesselowe wrote 599 days ago

Dear E.R.:
I bumped my own offering off to make room for "The Case of the Drowning Men," What more can I say? The pitch tweaked my interest, and the first paragrah grabbed me. I've only read the first chapter, but I'm hooked. I'm sure you've read the book "Torso," which is about the Torso murders that occurred in Cincinnati in the 1930's. The officials of that time refused to believe in a serial killer, and consequently one was never found. This book strongly reminds me of that same attitude of denial. Anyway, I'll continue to read and lose sleep. Jesselowe

jimcoso wrote 599 days ago

Hi,

Well researched and very interesting.Captivating.

Jim Coso, Passing Clouds

Andrew Esposito wrote 602 days ago

The Case of the Drowning Men is a compelling read. I was hooked right from the Disclaimer - it really added credibility to the subsequent casework and also prepared me for a disturbing journey. I did initially check the short pitch and the genre listing thinking it might be a War of the Worlds type spoof. Assuming it is all legit research, I think the narrator has presented the facts thoroughly and underpinned theories well with stats and quotes. I like the narration style - not too dry, as well as being introspective when it assists the explanation. I thought the background on the impact of drowning to a person's body was a little long winded, but concede that readers attracted to this sort of material will probably find the details useful.

There may be a few minor tweeks required early in Chapter One eg;

'on its face' might be better phrased as 'on the face of it'
remove at least one comma from ',and,'

Eponymous, I enjoyed your journalistic approach. The content is alarming and draws the reader into wanting to learn more. As the serial killer gang theory is still evolving, it adds to the eeriness of the casework and should keep a loyal reader following waiting for further updates. Rated highly. Best regards, Andrew Esposito / Killing Paradise

Eponymous Rox wrote 611 days ago


NOTE: This upload was modified on November 28th to include previews of additional works from this series. All ye true crime buffs, please visit www.KillingKillers.blogspot.com to find complete titles and to read other crime stuff for FREE.

AGAIN: I want to thank everyone here who has backed and continues to back THE CASE OF THE DROWNING MEN as well as those who provide me feedback on it. Authonomy's site is still sooooooo slooooooooow (and wonky) that I do believe sending thank-you notes via snail mail might get to you all faster than individually messaging at this time!

E.R.
https://www.amazon.com/author/eponymous + http://www.barnesandnoble.com/c/eponymous-rox

Next up in my case queue: KIDS KILLING KIDS explores youth-on-youth violence and its relationship to the media and features famous child killers Leopold and Loeb, Hulme and Parker, Mary Bell, Wyley Gates, Venables and Thompson, Harris and Klebold, Alyssa Bustamente, and Austin Reed Sigg.

Also in the works: THE 'PREPPIE KILLER' a biography of the black-hearted career criminal Robert Chambers.

(and more--always more--so stay tuned.)


wordworker wrote 612 days ago

Ch. 1 para starting, "Seems a reasonable enough ..." you write, "...if only one or two fatalities occurring ..." not clear ... try "if only one or two fatalities HAD OCCURRED" or "if there were only one or two fatalities occurring ..."
Para starting, "In 2004 the April ..." change "stoical" to "stoic" (the "al" is unnecessary and distracting)
Side note re: "They could have been murdered but the person was just so good..." I really don't agree with this assessment, because anyone who pays attention to criminal investigative procedures knows that you always leave something of yourself behind and carry away something of the victim. However, since the deaths were never investigated as possible homicides but were approached from the beginning as accidents, there would not have been a thorough CI search performed ... therefore, clues could have been missed and, indeed, in some cases, might still be extant at the scenes!
Para starting: "Fences, river patrols, safe buses ..." you write, "...knew that, to govern properly, people couldn't be,,," the people aren't governing, so you need to change the wording. The first pronoun or noun after the phrase, "to govern properly" must refer to those who wish to govern. Try something like: "...knew that, people couldn't be governed properly as long as they were living ..." or: "...knew that, to govern properly, the authorities needed to ensure that their citizens weren't living in ..." at the end of this para you use "rampart" where I think you mean "rampant".
As a reader and afficionado of well-done true crime books (Rule and Olsen are two of my favorites) this ranks right up there with several fine writers.
The problems I've discovered (I've been a professional proofreader and copy editor) are minor and seem to stem from the "write like you talk" school. While that's usually pretty good advice, it's also true that grammatical errors are more common and more easily "glossed over" when you have facial expressions and intonations to express your true meaning.
I'm hoping to read this complete book but new time constraints may force me to put it on hold for a while.
Whether I finish the book or not, believe me when I say your work is very good, your premise is not only believable but undeniably possible and I hope you get this published quickly!

Ron Mitchell wrote 613 days ago

This is a very well thought out plot that unfolds as the reader invests in the plot presented. It is disturbing, but definitely a page turner. Best of luck with this book. I appreciate your continued support of December Gold.

Odette67 wrote 616 days ago

Hi, have read the first 2 chapters, its an interesting read, very well researched and very graphic descriptions. Its rather hard hitting and very stark. its not the normal thing i would read but i am facinating, i look forward to the next part of the story.

will back when i have my shuffle..

Kate

off the rails and back to you

Abby Vandiver wrote 617 days ago

This is very good. I think I would rather read the printed version so I can see the pictures (is it just published as an ebook?). I find this intriguing and could certainly see how the explanations given did not relieve doubt. I even raised my eyebrow at the University's list of why it wasn't a serial killer. I want to read more. Very good.

Mindy Haig wrote 618 days ago

Wow! This is really good! I was not expecting it to be so engrossing! It is very well researced and factual, and yet told in a manner that make a compelling read. It's hard to put down.
Great work!
Mindy
The Wishing Place

Julie_Undead wrote 619 days ago

Extremely thorough research paired with good storytelling make this a satisfying read. I am very interested to read more of this awful mystery that I knew nothing about. This is something that needs to be made more public, and this is the best writing style to do so. Highly starred.
--Julie, author of Running Home

Julie_Undead wrote 619 days ago

Extremely thorough research paired with good storytelling make this a satisfying read. I am very interested to read more of this awful mystery that I knew nothing about. This is something that needs to be made more public, and this is the best writing style to do so. Highly starred.
--Julie, author of Running Home

LianneLB wrote 619 days ago

As a law and criminology graduate and a former court reporter, I am fascinated with crimes and investigations like this. I have read many books, from MAry Bell, to the Suffolk serial killer (mostly British crimes) and your book is incredibly well researched - especially as you only stumbled across these drownings at the beginning of this year. Your attention to detail is superb, and I am definitely intrigued to read more.

Lianne La Borde
Big Girl Lost

Louis W wrote 622 days ago

I hadn't heard of this crime wave before, but I'm intrigued. The book appears to be a carefully researched and constructed work. Beyond the facts, the author's carefully controlled style aids the believability, a style that refuses to rely on emotions to make its point. The staccato-like delivery helps too.

The manuscript needs a light edit for it's faintly marred by occasional sentence fragments such as "The segment untimely earning her an Emmy but apparently costing her a job." That's not a big problem because the writer's handling of language is competent with little in the way of unnecessary verbiage and modifiers. The only sign of questionable professionalism was following the link to the author's website where I found the continued use of Eponymous Rox surprising. Having trust in the facts and connecting with an author are crucial to reader acceptance.

But ultimately it's the underlying story that makes or breaks, and this story needs to be told. Having a background in journalism, I'm surprised to hear of reporters mocking and dismissing fellow newsmen, which sounds as if some jealousy or vested interest is in play. Somehow I don't think that will discourage this writer.

I congratulate the author for collecting and collating the "data" as he calls it and I back it.

Louis W wrote 623 days ago

I hadn't heard of this crime wave before, but I'm intrigued. The book appears to be a carefully researched and constructed work. Beyond the facts, the author's carefully controlled style aids the believability, a style that refuses to rely on emotions to make its point. The staccato-like delivery helps too.

The manuscript needs a light edit for it's faintly marred by occasional sentence fragments such as "The segment untimely earning her an Emmy but apparently costing her a job." That's not a big problem because the writer's handling of language is competent with little in the way of unnecessary verbiage and modifiers. The only sign of questionable professionalism was following the link to the author's website where I found the continued use of Eponymous Rox surprising. Having trust in the facts and connecting with an author are crucial to reader acceptance.

But ultimately it's the underlying story that makes or breaks, and this story needs to be told. Having a background in journalism, I'm surprised to hear of reporters mocking and dismissing fellow newsmen, which sounds as if some jealousy or vested interest is in play. Somehow I don't think that will discourage this writer.

I congratulate the author for collecting and collating the "data" as he calls it and I back it.

August74 wrote 624 days ago

This is compelling and disturbing in equal measure. And different too. It reminded me of Capote's In Cold Blood in that you have managed to write a true account but imbue it with the drama of fiction. All the best with it.

Kim Padgett-Clarke wrote 626 days ago

Wow this is fantastic. I have never known so much about drowning! It is so compelling that even though I was a little queasy to learn the hard facts about what happens post drowning I just had to read on. You must have put in a hell of a lot of research which I admire you for. I particulary like the way you went into such explicit details on the effects on the body when it drowns as a lot of writers might be tempted to skim over this kind of thing. You gave just enough facts without it becoming boring and then it sets the scene nicely for the rest of the book. The next crime drama I watch I will be looking for the signs that the body is face down and if not I will be sending an email to the producer ha.

Kim (Pain)

Lenny Banks wrote 630 days ago

Hi Eponymous Rox, I read chapter 4. Wow, I was stunned when I was reading this, I opened another search tab and typed in Patricks name as I had never heard of it, and everything was confirmed in news items and articles. It raises the point that there is a market for books of this type as I had never heard of the investigation or the sad death that had occurred. It is also interesting to me as you highlighted members of the community and even the local Police highlighting bad 'rumours and gossip' in order to de-sensitise the horroric events. Some of the researched young people who became 'students' in my book were institutionalized into thinking bad and looking bad, it makes me wonder where things started to go wrong. I was engrossed and work facinating. Good luck with this book and I think we are likely to see more of the same.

Kindest Regards and Best Wishes
Lenny Banks - Tide and Time: At The Rock
I would appreciate a return read, if you are able to find time.

Elayne wrote 631 days ago

A devastingly well written and clearly well researched work. Granted that the subject matter may not be to everyone's taste, for aficionados of true crime this must surely be on the wanted file. I liked the clarity and concise structure, this deserves to do really well.

Elayne

Jeanenne L. Cox wrote 632 days ago

Extremely well written, though not exactly my cup of tea. And not for someone with a very weak stomach. Though I am pretty sure that this is one that my father would love.

Good luck with this!

MarkAM wrote 635 days ago

Although these five chapters are a "Preview" of the already completed work, I found them to comprise a highly intelligent and intense compilation of criminal investigation which indicates a finely researched and compelling mystery. Hypothesis or factual conspiracy? This is the key note which captures the reader's analytical mind and holds one's attention to every possible nuance of the investigator's findings. A superb work! The writing is tightly structured and although at times graphic, it brings attention to the fact that forensics, patterns, theories, evidence and carefullly employed scrutiny all play a vital part in a criminal investigator's experiences. Quite an education indeed for readers, especially for those of us who love mysteries! A six-star work, my friend, and up it goes on my bookshelf. My very best wishes to you for the success of your book. It also belongs on the big screen at some point.

- Mark
"I'll Look to the Sky"

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