Book Jacket

 

rank 5919
word count 32529
date submitted 27.04.2013
date updated 15.02.2014
genres: Science Fiction, Popular Science
classification: universal
incomplete

The Contraception Virus

Michael Gray

The problem that nobody wants to address can no longer be ignored.

 

The inevitable conflict over natural resources, especially fresh water, is coming to a head with the uncontrolled rise in human global population. Something must be done!

Anno's team is a new concept and the result of many government's cooperation but it quickly exceeds its original brief and instigates global change in thinking and approach to the problem. What is initially interpreted as a nuclear threat turns out to be a way of reducing global numbers but it would be unacceptable if made public. Anno soon discovers that his objective is not shared by everyone and some are prepared to use the ultimate sanction to protect their interests.

 
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tags

diminishing natural resources., global population

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2 comments

 

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tecmic wrote 448 days ago

Hello Michael,
This is a first comment after a brief look through chapter 1.
I have not read any of your work before.

The scope of what you are trying to do here is incredible.
From what I have read so far it seems that your protagonist is tackling head-on at a topmost international level a variety of issues relating to water scarcity, over-population, over-use of non-renewable resources and the like.
Clearly, he is deeply committed to this, continuing despite the obstacles put in his way by industry and governments.

The beauty of your work is that your story is set against a backdrop of real science.

Personally, however, there are two things that didn't work too well for me:
Firstly, you cover so much ground so quickly. For example, the plot of chapter one alone would have been enough for a whole novel in itself in the hands of another writer. This made it quite a difficult read.

Secondly, the human element of the story, the development of character, was missing. What I mean is, you mention what he feels for his wife and his worry about her when she is kidnapped, but that is about it. This hugely traumatic kidnap experience basically occurs and is over and done with in a few paragraphs.

I understand that this is your natural writing style, but thought it may be useful to you to know how it came across to this reader.

Best wishes,
Fiona Haven
Falling Upwards



Thank you Fiona, I do appreciate feedback and accept what you say. A lack of character development has been an issue for some in my other work, I'll go back and look at that. As for the scope of the plot...it's a big subject with many facets, possibly the biggest issue that humanity has to deal with. Some high profile individuals in the real world are faced with multiple crisis situations in a short time span and even simultaneously. They either cope with it or change their occupation/preoccupation. The essence of this novel, I hope, is that it looks at the problem that we don't want to acknowledge and explores how we might change our behaviour when faced with
life threatening shortages. That presents endless storyline possibilities and at this moment in time I can't say how mine will develop, which is what I find exciting about this novel in particular.
Mike.

Fiona Haven wrote 448 days ago

Hello Michael,
This is a first comment after a brief look through chapter 1.
I have not read any of your work before.

The scope of what you are trying to do here is incredible.
From what I have read so far it seems that your protagonist is tackling head-on at a topmost international level a variety of issues relating to water scarcity, over-population, over-use of non-renewable resources and the like.
Clearly, he is deeply committed to this, continuing despite the obstacles put in his way by industry and governments.

The beauty of your work is that your story is set against a backdrop of real science.

Personally, however, there are two things that didn't work too well for me:
Firstly, you cover so much ground so quickly. For example, the plot of chapter one alone would have been enough for a whole novel in itself in the hands of another writer. This made it quite a difficult read.

Secondly, the human element of the story, the development of character, was missing. What I mean is, you mention what he feels for his wife and his worry about her when she is kidnapped, but that is about it. This hugely traumatic kidnap experience basically occurs and is over and done with in a few paragraphs.

I understand that this is your natural writing style, but thought it may be useful to you to know how it came across to this reader.

Best wishes,
Fiona Haven
Falling Upwards

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