Book Jacket

 

rank 729
word count 68760
date submitted 03.06.2009
date updated 28.03.2014
genres: Literary Fiction, Romance, Science ...
classification: moderate
incomplete

Sharing Short Stories

Cynthia Cordell

These short stories come from the heart...

 

These short stories root for the underdog. They touch on the challenges in life and find themselves to be resolved with a happy ending. My two personal favorites are "Karen Sylvester" and "Maven." The newest titles are "Harrington" and "Cloud Computing." Overall, "Wonder Mom" is about role models. "Sandra the Sleuth" is about internet crime. " Eden" is about the appreciation for beauty. "Andrew and Sherry" is about triumph over depression. "Karen Sylvester" is about materialism. "Into Marissa's Life" is a take on fashion. "Prison Rules" is about renewed lives. "Lola's Wedding" captures a beautiful wedding. "Maven" is a look at young love. "Sense of Familiarity" is about the sense of belonging. "Delving Closer" looks at an engaged couple. "Harrington" and "Could Computing" touch on the subject of computers.

Chapter 1 gives an index of all the short stories.

ENJOY

 
rate the book

to rate this book please Register or Login

 

tags

college, computer, depression, life, sleuthing, wedding

on 10 watchlists

171 comments

 

To leave comments on this or any book please Register or Login

subscribe to comments for this book
Maud Fitch wrote 650 days ago

At last, short stories, I love short stories and, Cynthia, I love YOUR short stories. In this electronic age of tweets and texts, I can't understand why this genre isn't more popular. Perfect length for commuting, lunchtime, waiting rooms and late night reads. As you know, it takes more discipline (and ruthless editing) to write a short story than it does to write a novel. More, more, keep writing more!
Best wishes,
Maud.

AarKay wrote 1224 days ago

Cynthia:

I enjoyed "Delving closer". You've skilfully woven the story of Jana's humanitarian values and her work in the elementary school with the emotional stirrings in her heart when she has misgivings about her relationship with Derek. The climactic scene of Jana and Derek with their friends in the engagement party is impressive and has a pleasant flavor . The title "Delving closer" has a lot of relevance with the ending.

I'll read the other stories too soon. I'm sure they'll be as good or even better. Congratulations for this wonderful compilation.

AarKay

fletcherkovich wrote 1354 days ago

Cynthia-

What I love in this collection of short stories, are the purest extracts of emotions out from your heart. Reading them makes me feel like I am listening to a very tender sweet voice narrating all these stories in front of me while I am shutting my eyes so slowy. Your narrative technique is sympathetic, tender and concise. Characterization makes this collection stand out from the rest of the novels here. I am a short story writer as well and I believe that you have simply shown your magical language happening in your stories. I love the messages that you want to display in your work. I have read 4 stories already but I think I am so attached to read more of this. Good luck to you and your writing career. I have already backed this before.

FLETCH
STORIES FROM A LEAKING MIND

Andrew Burans wrote 1361 days ago

You are an excellent story teller and deliver a different message with each story. I do admire your talent in switching topics and creating new characters so effortlessly. Your work is a pleasure to read. It's just my taste, and you do it well, maybe in some of your stories you could add just a touch more dialogue. Backed.

Andrew Burans
The Reluctant Warrior: The Beginning

Darius Stransky wrote 12 hours ago

Chapter Seven

Sandra the Sleuth

Intriguing.

Colourful (the stripe)

Well plotted (yours and Laurence's activities)

Resolved (and AYS dot Com end up winners)

Well done for a fine tale!

Darius
The King's Jew

Darius Stransky wrote 19 days ago

Chapter Five

Earthly Neighborhood

Hi Cynthia

The way you crafted two diametrically opposed themes together in this story was very clever.

Science and the Universe versus your own backyard and what is really important in life - HEALTH

The vageaire between th 'owners' of the company was also well crafted

I like short stories and it seems you have found your forte in these

I have set myself to read at least one of your story's every week. So it must have worked for me. THANKS

If you cast your eye on my work that'd be good as I need all the help I can get as I hover near the desk

Watchlisted you so backed and high starred

Best wishes to you and yours
Darius
The King's Jew

patio wrote 578 days ago

I read more this fab story and gave it 6 stars

patio wrote 637 days ago

I read 1-10 then double checked your genre as the stories read like real life. That's your amazing talent, to portray fiction as real life. I like that. I stopped at 10 because it hit nerves and bones. Its personal to me, the depression thing. Sherry and Andrew family told us that no matter what status people hold in life they are not immune from problems. As how my story end, the most important things in life are good health and freedom

Kenneth Edward Lim wrote 638 days ago

Cynthia,
"Lola's Wedding" somehow gave me the idea that I was about to glimpse a memorable event in a Filipino grandmother's past. Imagine my surprise when I met Lola the redhead planning a wedding yet to come with her beau just as red-blooded American as she was. Then little interesting details started popping up and I was carried along by the excitement of the wedding being recorded for television, the whole process to take three years till consummation. I must say it was an unusual read for me, following all the meticulous details of wedding preparation. Thank you so much for a story.both educational and entertaining.

Kenneth Edward Lim
The North Korean

Colin Neville wrote 648 days ago

I read the futuristic 'Prison Rules' and 'Maven', and enjoyed both. What was interesting to me was the way that present day habits, personality traits and behaviour is seen, realistically, to persist into the future. The creative imagination of the writer is then to imagine future scenarios to respond to these. In 'Prison Rules', the modern day problems related to illicit drugs and anti-social behaviour are still found, but Cynthia plausibly presents a society that has found new and more effective ways of dealing with them - ironically, through the use of legally approved mind-controlling and body-restricting drugs. The message is now on a balance of punishment and rehabilitation in the fture, rather than, as present, an over-emphasis toward punishment.

In 'Maven', love as we know it today still flourishes optimistically across the galaxies and this manifests itself in much the same way as today - but enhanced by alfora, an amorous potion! I liked the way that information, particularly graphic communication, was still an important feature of societal bonding.

Maud Fitch wrote 650 days ago

At last, short stories, I love short stories and, Cynthia, I love YOUR short stories. In this electronic age of tweets and texts, I can't understand why this genre isn't more popular. Perfect length for commuting, lunchtime, waiting rooms and late night reads. As you know, it takes more discipline (and ruthless editing) to write a short story than it does to write a novel. More, more, keep writing more!
Best wishes,
Maud.

MrKarats wrote 831 days ago

Cynthia,

I came by to have a taste of your short ones :) Full of smells, delicious foods and a bunch of girly stuff :D we men don't entirely get :)

I read Cloud Computing, Daily Diary, and then I turned to the last ones 'cause I thought people rarely turn to the last chapters of an upload. From the end I read Cookie Cutter Wednesdays.

I think your writing is flowing and your themes are certained around concerns of females, which is your target audience of course. In this context I think with some editing it can be well-received. And when I say editing I don't mean grammar corrections -as I didn't find anything- but mostly things like...for example, I would reconsider the use of the technical details in Cloud Computing if I were you... that sort of thing.

Other than that, I think you are doing great :) 5 stars from me.

Yannis

karen 19 wrote 834 days ago

Hello Cynthia,

Into Marissa's Life - I was drawn to this story because I have worked in fashion for many years. I found it quite charming, but nothing like my experiences in the fashion world. I enjoyed it though, your story is well written and it gave a different perspective to what I'm used to. Starred, and I'll get back to read more.

Karen 19
The Way Things Are

JOE ADU-GYAMFI wrote 854 days ago

Cynthia, i found so much joy reading 'DAILY DAIRY'-its such a lovely literary piece. The language is so refined that i feel i may read it again and again-like a child's favourite dress-he would want to wear it many times in a week.Thanks very much for creating such a lovely tale.

Neville wrote 869 days ago

Sharing Short Stories.
By - Cynthia J. Cordell.

I've taken a good look through your 'short stories'.
Each one is on a different theme and they come over well.
I suspect that you are well up on pc software and programing data formulations...good for you, Cynthia.
Didn't find much wrong here as I read along and actually enjoyed your writing.
Will take a look at your other book later.
Best wishes and good luck with your book.
Star Rated!!

Well done!

Kind regards,

Neville. The Secrets of the Forest - The Time Zone.

a.morrison712 wrote 937 days ago

I read chapter 5. I liked the main character's name. ;) I'm partial to that one. Paced well and I thought the writing flowed easily off the page. You know how to tell a tale. I love the line Promoting Physical fitnesses establishes hope.... Also, nice use of italics. I have given you high stars and hope to see this do well! Good luck!

Ashley
"Maddy Hatfield and the Magic Locket'

Nigel Fields wrote 1082 days ago

Cynthia,
I've just never been good at writing short stories--they always beg to be epics. And, I don't know why short stories aren't more popular in this time-strapped day and age. That being said, I think you have a very nice collection here. In 8/Eden, you might consider showing the tension a bit. You say, Tension mounted on the Alecner discussion. Perhaps a quick line on Oliver's manifestation of this, then Arthur's.
It is evident that you enjoy writing these stories--this comes out in their tone and should make any reader feel similarly.
Best,
John B Campbell

J.S.Watts wrote 1135 days ago

Karen Sylvester – A positive story with an upbeat, or at least hopeful, ending. There were some very descriptive passages in there, but you might like to think about balancing these with some immediate plot activity. All the action somehow seemed a little divorced from the reader: described from a distance rather than immersing the reader in it.

Some specific thoughts may be of assistance: In the opening paragraph “in the past” may not be necessary and it has an odd effect on the tense for the reader. You might want to try ‘her other past jobs’. Also “in back of a Honda motor scooter” sounds strange. Maybe from the back or on the back would be better?

The odd clunky sentence marrs the flow of the prose e.g. “to what the photographer preferred”. How about something like “to match the photographer’s preferences”?

I hope these thoughts are of assistance.

J.S.Watts
A Darker Moon

Lucia13 wrote 1141 days ago

Hello Cynthia.

You describe your stories as having happy endings, and they do! They are really uplifting in spirit in many ways and are “feel good” reads. Thematically, I see a strong vein of female empowerment, friendship, and women who are intelligent with careers that they not only enjoy, but ones that do a service to others. Because your language usage is light and airy, and because of the themes, I think you might do better marketing this as women’s fiction, rather than literary fiction. Some of my comments are from a lit fiction point of view, but I feel that some of my suggestions could be ignored if you did market this as a women’s fiction. The market for women’s fiction is great and these inspirational short stories would be great for someone to read for a nice wash of happiness.

I feel that you need to either change or add more to your long pitch. I really liked the idea that you gave short blurbs about what category each story would fall into because I saw a few that piqued my interest in a flash, and attracting readers is a goal with your pitch. I’m not sure if you’d want to expand this portion and place it at the beginning of your book, or maybe you could write a long pitch and place these descriptions after the pitch. For your pitch, I’d expand upon your short pitch, explaining some of the more important themes in your stories. From the ones that I read, there is a great cohesiveness between them, and you could build upon that for your long pitch. Also, “cloud” is spelled wrong at the end.

Chapter 13—Daily Diary
This is a great idea. The bond between these women is strengthened by the connection of the diary, their friendship and how they rely upon one another, but they maintain their individuality as you switch from one keeper of the diary to the next.
Some suggestions:
Paragraph 2, last sentence:
“She was like a kid in a candy store.” This is a cliché, and although I don’t think it works for literary fiction, if you market this as women’s fiction, I think you could keep it.
Paragraph 4, last sentence:
It reads, “Upon reaching…” the sentence is long and a bit awkward, I’d suggest rewording it.
Paragraph 5, 1st sentence:
You could simplify this sentence, or break it into two sentences to make it easier to read. You use the word “legging” twice in the sentence, which makes the sentence heavy.
Paragraph 6, Sentence 3:
The sentence is clunky, replace or delete “suddenly”. Change the “and” to a “so” because it confuses the idea you’re conveying.
Paragraph 7, 1st sentence:
Clarify who the caller is or reword it so it doesn’t sound like the machine is talking.
Paragraph 7, last sentence:
Delete “could be” and change it to “was” to help clarify.
Paragraph 8, 1st sentence:
Change it to: The Daily Diary, right. Mandy…
Delete “that” and “indeed” Reword it: Mandy remembered she was the one chosen to start a circling diary for her group of friends. The word “circling” and “circle” in the same sentence jar the read.

Paragraph 12, last sentence:
Move it so it is the first sentence of paragraph 13

In Cassie’s diary entry, the letter she gets from the high school student—the student uses the word, “nebulous.” I felt like it was a word uncommonly used by high school students, so it jarred my reading.

The ending seemed a bit abrupt for me. I’d expand on it to make the transition to the ending smoother.

Chapter 15—Harrington

I liked this story—it gave an important message in a nice, succinct way. In short story collections, I enjoy some of the stories being different lengths because they give the reader a variety of choices. This story is very flexible. It’s short, but could be expandable by simply adding examples of paradigms.

One suggestion, in paragraph 1, you could erase the first “had.”

Chapter 16—Cloud Computing

This story has a strong focus on Chelsea’s career. I felt like you did a good job of showing us her inner spirit and she was a very likable character. There was a nice balance between her thoughts and her actions, letting the reader get to know her quickly; a perfect character sketch for a short story.
My only nit was that the technical aspect of explaining the computing business was a bit heavy. As a reader with some, but not extensive computer knowledge, I felt a little alienated. However, your ending brought the story back around nicely for another closure that left me smiling.

Chapter 17—Earthly Neighborhood

This story is really in-tune with your over-all theme—people helping others, overcoming obstacles, friendship, and what perseverance can do for a cause. I enjoyed Warren’s character, and the ending was great. I felt that the reading was smooth and it was interesting.

Chapter 18—Labels and Preparation

I like the idea of labels and lists. You convey this well throughout the story. I also like the idea of labels on clothing, and clothing was an important part of this story. It’s a nice connection that is tucked in here. This story also continues with the theme of friendship and perseverance.

Paragraph 3, sentence 3:
“forever on” and “endless” in reference to diets is like saying the same thing twice, I’d pick one.
Paragraph 4:
Eliminate unnecessary speaker tags—“Lois said”
Paragraph 5:
Eliminate “Sylvia suggested to Lois” It’s not needed
Paragraph 13, last sentence:
“…the bond between them was secured with super glue.”
I think this is a weak metaphor and you could replace it with something that was less jarring to the story, maybe something in reference to labels.

Overall, I think this set of stories is a successful collection of insightful and stirring portraits of friendship and will. If I owned this book, it is definitely something I’d pick up to read if I was feeling down! Good luck with this!

Lucia
Vein Fire

Marita A. Hansen wrote 1154 days ago

I had time to read the first two stories. I thought the first one built up Karen's character well, but it was the second one that I thought was the best. I liked how Sandra gradually worked out who the hacker was. As it progressed I started to wonder whether they would offer him a job due to his capabilities, and I liked it that they did. Not a good punishment for a crime, but I have read about this happening in real life, so for some reason I found it the best outcome for your story. Plus, I liked Lawrence's character.

All the best - Marita. P.S. I didn't spot any typos.

curiousturtle wrote 1158 days ago

Cynthia,

I started reading your Opus and thought I would give you my cent and half:

The first and ninth, your personal favorites.

The first thing that jumps here is the style. Is a moment by moment description where every description is a dangling act promising the next to have the same endearing effect ....

..... and that you deliver.

The jewel of the narrative is the psychological map of your central characters. The ebbs and flows of Karen as she goes about reconciling the silliness with the ambition, the titillation with the responsibility, the wishes with the pauses....

......and she does her grace shows.

Some of my favorites:

"She loved to go to the nail salon.....'
this whole paragraph is wonderfully descriptive and what is does is set the atmosphere for the piece.

"his coffee in hand....."

"once a mudslide"

"pearl hearts"
I have never seen this which is why I liked for, If wanted to read about things I have already seen, I would take the subway...lol

"Maven's wedding gown"
Again, wonderfully descriptive

Some Minor/Minorest/Minormost points:

"struggling to make ends meet" "tragically felt" "her sorrows" "Sadly..."
I would cut a bit on the emotional labeling
Why?
Because when the writer labels an emotion, the reader reads ...the label
when he uses body language to describe...the reader feels...and as he does the emotion is evoked in his/her head

I would also cut a bit on the modifiers
"As you would agree by know, Karen was somewhat materialistic"
I would eliminate this phrase altogether, as well as the starting line were you repeat it
why?
Because after that wonderfully detailed description, you don't need the modifiers to act as a label
As Updike said: "the modern reader can fill in the blanks"

Let me know if that helps,

Overall, very endearing

david

Nanty wrote 1168 days ago

Sharing Short Stories.
Karen Sylvester.
I would have liked this story more if you had shown Karen moving through her life and finally focusing on material aspects of it, rather than telling. Although you provided a lot of information about Karen, I could not hear her voice. I got no sense her personality (materialism being one facet of it), her interaction with friends and work colleagues, her frustrations, relationship with family (assuming she has one) or her sense of fun. I know this is a short story but some of the aforementioned could have been injected by showing her actions.
Sandra the Sleuth.
I feel I know more about what sort of person Lawrence Donaldson is than Sarah Howard, who has tracked him down. This is because in his short piece of dialogue he says what he needed money for. This in turn gives an idea of his family's financial situation, his aspirations and that he'll work to get what he wants. When Sarah finally does speak, she comes across as not just a clever girl, but a compassionate one. But, the reader doesn't find this out until the very end of the story.
In my opinion, your characters need to be fleshed out so that a reader can relate or identify with them. You have some interesting ideas and your writing is fluid but your stories are lacking depth at the moment, despite the fact that they seem to be drawn from personal experience or what you have experienced from others you have come into contact with.

Nanty - Chrys!

Old Bob wrote 1170 days ago

Hi Cynthia. Read your first story and have a comment or two. You obviously have a lot to say. I believe you would do yourself a great service if you wrote more in the present and more in active voice. You're very descriptive but I think you lack a lot of punch by not bringing readers into the story.

Hope you don't take this comment in the wrong way. I'm just trying to be helpful. If you like, take a shot at my book, A PLACE IN LIFE. I'd appreciate hearing your first impression.

Good luck with your book.

Old Bob
A PLACE IN LIFE

celticwriter wrote 1172 days ago

Hi Cynthia, nice! Placing yours on my watch list for now...will read more later tonight.

blessings,
jim

GK Stritch wrote 1196 days ago

I did enjoy your short stories straight from the heart, Cynthia, you darling lovely lady. Cheers to you in 2011.

Your friend.

GK Stritch
CBGB Was My High School

blueboy wrote 1207 days ago

sorry it took so long. I was sick for a while and the library had odd hours over the holiday. ok, i can see you are a serious writer. you have a creative mind, and interesting narrative elements, and perspective. In my opinion, however, you really would benifit from a class on creative writing. Your intuition (in my pinion), for story telling is a off a bit, and you may want to engage local writers to proof your manuscrpt and provide specific suggestions. This will help you hone your abilities; which you should do because you do seem to have a story to tell. From what I've read I can tell you are a "prose" writer, so an active voice with lots of action and dialogue will bring out your strengths as a writer. You should avoid massive amounts of narration, your voice is not strong enough yet to carry the day (in my opinion) lol. I keep saying that because i don't want to hurt you feelings, and you are free to disagree. But I really think you should concentrate on more "action and dialogue" to carry the reader along. Long stretches of narration is something that takes a lot of fluid energy to pull off, and your voice is on the dry side. Too much narration is the enemy of a prose style voice, as it can make the read tedious. Engage the reader with action and dialogue, the nuts and bolts of your story, and it will shine. Shoot for less narrated details and less passive story telling. Transport the reader "into" the action, as if they are there watching everything occur, rather than simply telling them what has happened through your narrator. Describe the action in such a way as to make the reader feel they are actually there watching the story unfold and you will have done your job. As it is, the reader gets the sense that someone else is viewing the action through a window and is telling them what is going on outside. this makes it hard for the reader get involved and commit emotionally.

hone your intuition for story telling, and edit for active voice. enjoyed your perspective very much. goodluck with your writing. sorry, i don't feel i can support this at this time, as the books on my shelf are more advanced, but i do wish you the best.


blueboy

A. Zoomer wrote 1213 days ago

SHARING SHORT STORIES.

Dear Cynthia,

I enjoy the domestic details of your stories. I read Karen Sylvester and then Cloud Computer. They have just enough story and perfect pacing.
Well done.
I have sprinkled stars on the book and it is on my WL for a second time on my shelf.
A Zoomer

AarKay wrote 1224 days ago

Cynthia:

I enjoyed "Delving closer". You've skilfully woven the story of Jana's humanitarian values and her work in the elementary school with the emotional stirrings in her heart when she has misgivings about her relationship with Derek. The climactic scene of Jana and Derek with their friends in the engagement party is impressive and has a pleasant flavor . The title "Delving closer" has a lot of relevance with the ending.

I'll read the other stories too soon. I'm sure they'll be as good or even better. Congratulations for this wonderful compilation.

AarKay

AarKay wrote 1224 days ago

Cynthia:

I enjoyed "Delving closer". You've skilfully woven the story of Jana's humanitarian values and her work in the elementary school with the emotional stirrings in her heart when she has misgivings about her relationship with Derek. The climactic scene of Jana and Derek with their friends in the engagement party is impressive and has a pleasant flavor . The title "Delving closer" has a lot of relevance with the ending.

I'll read the other stories too soon. I'm sure they'll be as good or even better. Congratulations for this wonderful compilation.

AarKay

Kaimaparamban wrote 1240 days ago

Hi Cynthia,

You handled the language very well. You confined a large world in some sentences. It is a magical experience for everyone. Your writing seems to be of a seasoned writer.

Joy J. Kaimaparamban
The Wildfire

fh wrote 1248 days ago

SHARING SHORT STORIES
I remember these short stories well, from reading them a month or two back. I thought then that they were very moving, emotional and quite beautiful. You imagination is immense and how on earth can you switch from one topic to another with such ease?
I can class these all differently - upbeat, at ease, seductive, calming. It is easy to become trapped, seduced and caught up in this book. I have given this very high stars.
Well done
Faith
THEASSASSINS VILLAGE

JOE ADU-GYAMFI wrote 1253 days ago

I was glad when i came across ur book.I personally luv short stories bcos its easy n fun to read.I think all the stories are beautiful,the language flows very well and the suspense is high too.With its deftly written style this collection will surely be an instant hit.
JOE-HERBIVORE CITY

Elijah Enyereibe Iwuji wrote 1270 days ago

Dear Cynthy,

Once again I have re-read the first two chapters of your short stories, and found they have drastically improved. The stories trip smoothly and well written. Know great edits have gone into it. Check out paragraph three of the first chapter if what you intend to write is: '...or lighter then her nail colour', or '...or lighter than her nail colour.' Goodluck:-) x x x x

GK Stritch wrote 1290 days ago

Dear Cynthia J. Cordell,

Thanks for rooting for the underdoggie. You cheered me up with your short stories from the heart. How true, Karen Sylvester, how true to life, and Heather and Florence and Hannah and all the other ladies you present with your stylish pen -- make that computer keyboard.

Thanks for Sharing Short Stories.

GK Stritch
CBGB Was My High School

C W Bigelow wrote 1292 days ago

Cynthia, just finished Sandra the Sleuth - enjoyed it! Will read more as I find time. Backed. CW (To Save the Sun)

John Warren-Anderson wrote 1299 days ago

I enjoyed Sandra the Sleuth. It stayed focused on the story and kept interest to the end.
Very good.

PATRICK BARRETT wrote 1319 days ago

I will have to keep skipping back to read different stories but you obviously have the talent to succeed with all types of writing. A pleasure to 'dip into' Cynthia. Paula Barrett (Cuthbert-how mean is my valley)

Craig Ellis wrote 1331 days ago

I read Chapter 5, and it is a wonderful story, upbeat, with a clear message. You have nice light flow to your work.

Only nitpick: I would have added more dialogue, and told some of the story through that.

Still, great read. I have backed this book previously on the strength of the first story.

Thanks

Craig

Wilma1 wrote 1335 days ago

I liked what I read in your pitch and flipped through the chapters settling on 1, 3, 8, I think you have a very open writing style and bring something fresh to each new story. This would be a good book for a long train or coach trip as its easily dip-in-able. I’m not overly ken on the jacket it gives the impression of middle aged fuddy duddy and that’s not the case at all.
Wilma1
Knowing Liam Riley – I hope you can spare a moment to take a look.

Darugh wrote 1349 days ago

First, you are to be congratulated on getting almost 40,000 words down on paper. That is a HUGE accomplishment! Most people spend years saying that they're going to write some day, but they never get around to producing anything. This effort on your part shows your dedication to your work. What's great about having it all on paper is that now you truly have something you can work with - edit, revise, add, subtract, etc. Without clay, a sculptor cannot sculpt. You have the "clay" to work with now and I have no doubt that you have the fortitude to "sculpt" your manuscript into a true work of art.

Second, my problem is that the stories I have read - and I only read four - are TELLING, not SHOWING. There is a difference. Newspapers tell us what happened and when and why and where. Stories SHOW us what happened - they put us into the action, into the scene. They UNFOLD. Sometimes an author uses description, sometimes dialogue, sometimes action - but always we are IN the scene. I followed the story line because you told it to me - just as you would if I were talking to you on the phone - but at no time was I INVOLVED in the story. (This is rather difficult to explain - I can only recommend that you read some short stories and ask yourself how the writer is showing and not telling.

Third, someone once said that a good short story is one in which the main character turns either a
"corner" or a "hair." I've always liked that - and it's a question I always ask when reading short stories. Your characters often turn corners - but I don't always feel that I am "there" with them.

In the meantime, DO pat yourself on the back for all your hard work. You have lots of material to work with here, and I have no doubt that these stories will end up on bookstore shelves someday.

Patricia West Hays
The Witness Tree

CarolinaAl wrote 1353 days ago

This is a vibrant collection of short stories with colorful, well developed characters. Crisp dialogue. Evocative narrative. Spot on storylines. Vivid writing. Backed.

Elizabeth Wolfe wrote 1353 days ago

Dear Cynthia,
You have a dramatic writing style that draws the reader in. I don't know in your pitch that you need to list every story title and description. How about just the first few sentences, the essence and the theme of the collection. That's a small point though - I really enjoy your style!

BACKED
Elizabeth Wolfe (MEMORIES OF GLORY)

Here is your chance to get a double backing. My friend, homewriter, and I have similar taste in writing and trust each other's judgment. Back my book and leave it on your bookshelf. Then do the same for his, "The Harpist of Madrid." Once the backings register, he will give you a return backing guaranteed. Just let him know in an email that you've backed my book as well as his. You might have to be a bit patient as we're 6 time zones apart. But you'll have two backings guaranteed on your excellent book. Of course, comments are always welcome too!

fletcherkovich wrote 1354 days ago

Cynthia-

What I love in this collection of short stories, are the purest extracts of emotions out from your heart. Reading them makes me feel like I am listening to a very tender sweet voice narrating all these stories in front of me while I am shutting my eyes so slowy. Your narrative technique is sympathetic, tender and concise. Characterization makes this collection stand out from the rest of the novels here. I am a short story writer as well and I believe that you have simply shown your magical language happening in your stories. I love the messages that you want to display in your work. I have read 4 stories already but I think I am so attached to read more of this. Good luck to you and your writing career. I have already backed this before.

FLETCH
STORIES FROM A LEAKING MIND

mvw888 wrote 1355 days ago

Charming stories, well written and with a tone that is almost conversational. Enjoyed this.

---Mary
The Qualities of Wood

andrew skaife wrote 1355 days ago

This has a lot of qualities that set it away from the romance genre but also a lot that include it. Sometimes I think that by limiting a great piece of writing to romance you dissuade so many readers. Romance can surely be a part of dramatic literary fiction and your writing would more than hold its own on that stage.

BACKED

livid wrote 1356 days ago

Not my genre but the writing, your use of language and the structure are all excellently handled. I am sorry not to be able to comment on content because I am not qualified to and would be unhelpful at best. The crafting is good though.

backed

Katy Christie wrote 1356 days ago

I only read Chapter 5 - on your recommendation - but if the other stories follow suit, then they should also make good reads. I don't often read short stories, but they have a place in life and I should probably do it more often. Thank you for this re-introduction. Good luck.
Katy Christie
No Man No Cry

Njoy14u wrote 1356 days ago

Hi Cynthia,
Great stories very enjoyable and an easy read, you deal with important subject matters that affect so many people.
Njoyed
*moods and expressions*

Elijah Enyereibe Iwuji wrote 1356 days ago

Hi Cynthy,

I just read chapter 16 according to your direction, and it seems like you are a very good cook. Your description and combination is superb. The chapter seemed interesting. will continue to morrow, goodluck.

Walden Carrington wrote 1356 days ago

Cynthia,
Sharing Short Stories is a refreshing change from novel-length fiction. It's a charming collection. Backed.

lynn clayton wrote 1357 days ago

Each story has its own themes and pre-occupations, subtle but there.
Your characters are clear and differentiated, the settings letting us know exactly where we are. The only thing I missed was hearing how your characters speak. Dialogue is not as important in short stories as full-length novels and you can easily get away with these stories as they are.
But a little dialogue at significant points would, I think, improve them. For example, in 'Wonder Mom', where she remonstrates with Florence for her wall art, it comes immediately to life.
Excellent, though. Backed. Lynn

hikey wrote 1357 days ago

Cynthia its so nice to be able to read your highly imaginative and entertaining stories.
Wishing you every success with your writing.
Jane

Elijah Enyereibe Iwuji wrote 1359 days ago

Hi Cynthy,

I read though chapter eight about Lola's software wedding preparation, Its very captivating and gripping indeed. Goodluck.

Andrew Burans wrote 1361 days ago

You are an excellent story teller and deliver a different message with each story. I do admire your talent in switching topics and creating new characters so effortlessly. Your work is a pleasure to read. It's just my taste, and you do it well, maybe in some of your stories you could add just a touch more dialogue. Backed.

Andrew Burans
The Reluctant Warrior: The Beginning