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What is the British equivalent?

Weaver Reads

first registered 23.02.11

last online 13 days ago

I can only find slang in my research. Does anyone know what a 19th century british household servant would say, instead of what I have?--

1) Land sakes

and

2) No worries


Posted: 14/01/2012 18:21:34

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Writer in Red

first registered 18.11.11

last online 378 days ago

http://www.peevish.co.uk/slang/

Maybe helpful


Posted: 14/01/2012 18:25:26

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Jim Darcy

first registered 27.10.08

last online 4 days ago

Depends where in the UK they were from and which level of servant.

Posted: 14/01/2012 18:25:50

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Lady Midnight

first registered 06.03.10

last online 5 hours ago

Depends which part of Britain they're from, but "blimey" might be appropriate. I believe it's slang for "blind me."

Posted: 14/01/2012 18:26:18

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Weaver Reads

first registered 23.02.11

last online 13 days ago

She's a lady's maid and wonderful, yet opinionated. Smile

Posted: 14/01/2012 18:30:38

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Jue Shaw

first registered 09.02.11

last online 15 hours ago

Hope this helps, a Victorian slang glossary for the lower classes.

http://www.tlucretius.net/Sophie/Castle/victorian_slang.html









Posted: 14/01/2012 18:32:13

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Jue Shaw

first registered 09.02.11

last online 15 hours ago

oops, just realised that you didn't want slang Sad

Posted: 14/01/2012 18:33:31

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JohnDoe

first registered 05.04.10

last online 6 days ago

Cross cultural expressions are quite in use here. 'No worries' wouldn't seem out of place here I think. It would depend more on the kind of person saying it. You could use 'No problem'.

Land sakes is definitely not something you'd here though. I guess you're looking for a non-expletive version... 'For heaven's sake'. But again, really depends on what kind of character is saying it.


Posted: 14/01/2012 18:33:51

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John Bayliss

first registered 27.09.11

last online 18 mins ago

It also depends on who they are talking to. Talking to another servant in an "off-duty" moment, she'd likely use more colourful language that when talking to her employer or a member of her family.

Posted: 14/01/2012 18:35:28

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Weaver Reads

first registered 23.02.11

last online 13 days ago

Most of these slang sites have only objects. I need expressions or sayings. I found this one (For Pete's sake!), but I thought it was American too. Very confusing to determine.




Posted: 14/01/2012 18:36:59

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